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- ^_ 
WEST VIRGINIA AfcmiSgE. 



( 



MOBGANTOWH : 

MORGAN & HOFFMAN, PRIN'J BBfi 
- 1867. 









°\ 



REGULATIO N S 



FOK THE GOVERNMENT OF 

^t est \ ivqinia JUrittttem^^8#e 



^ 



CHAPTER I. 



OBJECT OF TILE COLLEGE. 

1. P>\ tire Ad of Congress, approved July 2, 1862, the 
object of this Institution is declared to be, "to promote the, 
Uberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the sev- 
eral pursuits "n<l profi ssions in Ufe." 



CHAPTEK EL 



OF THE FACULTY. 

1. The Faculty of theilSa^snaft^sisit of a President, 
Vice President, and such Professors and Teachers as the 

Board of JKxRJM jra\\\ , from time to time, appoint. 

•1. Extraordinary Professors and Visitors, temporarily 
appointed or licensed, shall not be considered as members 
of the Faculty. 

The Faculty have authority to make all orders and 
regulations necessary to the performance of their duties. 
They have the general co^utwd and direction of the studies 
pursued in the uSU^K^'j^ey have cognizance of all offen- 

►mmitted by undergraduates, ami it is their special 
duty individually and collectively, to enforce the observance 
of all the laws and regulations for maintaining discipline 
and promoting order, virtue, piety, and good learning in the 
[institution. 

4. They are authorized to license Teachers of the polite 
accomplishments, and of exercises conducive lo health, and 



LAWS OF WEST VA. AG. COLLEGE. 



the students are not permitted to attend Teachers not thus 
licensed. 

5. They shall meet from time to time, on their own ad- 
journment. Any three, of whom the President must he 
one, shall constitute a quorum. They shall appoint a Sec- 
retary, who shall keep a record of their proceedings. Each 
member shall have a free and equal voice in all deliberations 
and conclusions; but, in case the votes are equally divided, 
the President shall have the casting vote in addition to his 
vote as a member of the Faculty. 

6. If any member of the Faculty wishes to dissolve' his 
connection with the Board, he shall give sixty days notice: 
and he shall be entitled to a like notice from the Board. 

7. An exemplary diligence in study and in the communi- 
cation of knowledge and performance of every moral and 
religious duty, is required of the Faculty and Teachers. 

r They shall, unless excused, attend all public exercises of the 
/2-c*-<-^£'v^^7 1 §§i&§?£ during the week and on the Sabbath. 



8. They shall recommend to the Board of Yi siUnk ,. at the 
annual meeting, such membersof the Senior Class, in the 
several Departments of the Stfiege^l^'l^all have satisfac- 
torily completed the course of study in said Departments, 
and as they shall deem worthy to receive the Degree of 
Bachelor of Arts, or Bachelor of Science, in regular course: 
and upon the day of Annual Commencement, in each and 
every year, they shall publicly, through the President, grant 
and confirm, by the authority in them vested, the Degree 
aforesaid, to so many of^he classes aforesaid respectively, 
as the Board of $£«u4&i#4hall approve. 

// y— 9. They may, in like manner, nominate to the Board of 

! } <A*4 r fHw VTmte&j such persons having been graduated A. B., or S. B.. 
/J for three or more years, and having paid the prescribed fee. 

as they may deem deserving of the second or Master's De- 
gree in the Arts or in Science, which Degree they shall 
confer as in ths former case upon the approval of the Board 
< )f Visitor . X^-Jg^ ^£5~; 

10. The Faculty may recommend other persons as worthy 
to receive the first, second, or higher degrees in the Liberal 
Arts and in Science* and on receiving the approval of the 
Board of Xj^SSj^snall confer said degrees. 

n - ( 11. No member of the Faculty or regular Teacher in the 

[(^Ky^iy^iU^At^^^Xe^e^ shall engage in any occupation or pursuit which 
"will interfere with the stated" and punctual discharge of the 
duties of his office, unless permitted to do so by the Board 
of States*. K^Pp^JCT, 



LAWS OF WEST VA. 



12. Xo member of the Faculty shall connect himself or 
continue connected with any secret college fraternity; 
whether now in existence, or which may be formed hen 
ter; and all the members of the Faculty are required to 
exert -their influence for the suppression of all such secret 
associations. 

13. The Faculty shall enact a system oi' grading, govern- 
ment and administration, which shall be uniform in all the 
departments so far as is practicable. They have adequate 
power for all ordinary cases of order and discipline. The 

rank of the President shall be first; Vice President, second, 

and that of the Professors shall be severally as their senior- 

tv in office. 

» 

14. It shall be thd-duty of the President, as the Head of 
the <i^*&^tcY^ipe intend all its interests, in every depart- 
ment, as he may deem expedient; to preside a U^Ji^^^ : w^r 
of the Faculty and public assemblages of the ^rnlef^ flmli / 
to see that the* ordinances are observed by Professors and 
Teachers, as well as by Students. In his absence the Vice 
President, and in the absence of both President and Vice 
President, the senior Professor present shall take his place 
and be clothed with his authority, pro tempore. 



•&**-< 



CHAPTER III. 



OF ADMISSION AND MATRICULATION. 

, 1. Every candidate for admission into any Department of 

*A Qr 11 ' i > n> / shall produce satisfactory evidence of a good moral 
'charactov, and Jt/kj shall have been connected with any 
other fcolteg^f i est^i 1 1 produce a certificate from the author- 
ities of that SJ^to^^fin^r cffli 1 a r and honorable dismission 
and standing. 

2. The qualifications for admission shall, from time to 
time, be determined by the Faculty, subject to the appro- 
bation of the Board of ViM^rx AlJL^ +>«-<~7 

3. Xo student shall be admitted to an advance standing, 
unless he be found, on examination, to be ecpial to the class 
for which he is a candidate. 

4. Xo person -hall be admitted ittto the Senior class after 
the beginning of the C£8te*e yeaSw 



'& 



5. If any candidate for any class give evidence that he in- 
capable of pursuing the studies of that class — although de- 



6 LAWS OF WEST VA. AG. COLLEGE. 

ticient in certain branches — he maybe admitted on condition 
of making up such deficiency; and all such cases, with 
the proper limitation of time tor each within which such 
deficiency is to be made up, are referred to the discretion 
of the Faculty. w- a . " tr, — . 

6. Xo person shall be admitted into -feft^s but by vote 
of the Faculty, taken after his testimonials have been sub- 
mitted and his examination passed. 

7. Every student shall be matriculated in the presence of 
the Faculty, by recording the name and the address of his 
father or guardian, his own age and residence, and signing 
his name to the following agreement, in a book kept for the 
purpose: /f * r — 

"Being admitted as a member of the Cdillrjr x I promise 
and bind myself to obey the laws, rules and regulations of 
the same; to conduct myself with propriety; to be diligent 
in study; to be respectful to the Faculty, and 'to deport my- 
self as a gentleman in morality and courtesy among my 
fellow students, and in the community generally. 

"Witness my hand." 



CHAPTER IV 



OF THE COURSE OF STUDY. 

1. Instruction shall be given in the usual Academic, Col- 
legiate and Scientific branches, including Agriculture and 
Military Tactics, as set forth in the Curriculum of Study. 

2. The Faculty shall cause to be published, once a year, 
a circular, in which shall be set forth the distribution 
of those studies throughout the several departments and 
classes. 

3. At the beginning of each session, and as much oftenei* 
as to the President may seem expedient, there shall be a 
meeting of the officers of instruction in which shall be as- 
signed to each his part; Provided nothing more shall be 
assigned to the President over and above his proper chair 
than he shall voluntarily accept; and that the other Profes- 
sors severally shall have the branches they profess included 
in their parts of the distribution. The frequency with which 
each class shall recite shall be determined at these meetings. 



LAWS OF WEBT VA. Mi. COLLEGE. 



CHAPTER V. 

OF Tin: (m llj*jwv yi:Yi:. 

1. The public Commencement shall be held on the third 
Thursday in Jjnne of each year. 

2. The tJSfege ^snaltiaciude three sessions or terms of 

SUB iollow-s*-4o AV.vt: •-"■ 

The first term shall begin the first Monday of Septembei 
and continue thirteen weeks. 

The second term shall begin within a week or so after the 
.-lose o\' the first term, and, not including the week between 
Christmas and New Year's, continue thirteen weeks. 

The third term shall begin within a week after the close 
of second term and continue until Commencement. 



CHAPTER VI. 



EXAMINA TIONS. 

1. The several classes shall be examined at the close of 
each session, upon the studies of the session, and at the 
dose of the year upon the studies of the year. 

'2. These examinations shall be oral, or written, or both, 
as may best test the proficiency of the student; they shall 
be conducted by or in the presence of at least two members 
of the Faculty beside the Professor in charge. With these 
may be associated such gentlemen as may be invited for the 
purpose. 

■\. The examination of the Senior Class may be held five 
weeks before Commencement. 



■«BC « 



CIIAPTKK VII. 



( i Ii A 1) ES A X I) J I () \ ORS. 

1. Students shall receive from each 1 Vofessor marks of 
merit or demerit, according to an equitable and uniform 
scale, tor their attendance, punctuality, propriety of conduct, 
diligence and attainments. A monthly report of these 
marks shall be made to the Faculty and entered into a Re- 
nter, to be considered in subsequent and general estimates 
of their merit and conduct. 



LAWS OF WEST VA. AG. COLLEGE. 



2. At the close of each term, or oftener, a report shall be 
made to the parent or guardian, of the standing of the stu- 
dent for that term; also at the end of the year for that year, 
including the maximum of the class, the average and the 
attainable. 

3. A roll of the Senior Class shall be made out, after their 

final examination, in the order of their general merit, an<L*p 

so reported to the Board of jJJHJil L T i( |j^jll_i j * j fT^^ rfQ 



4. Xo Undergraduate shall be passed from one class to 
another above it, nor be recommended for a degree, whose 
standing shall not, in the aggregate, be equal to a certain 
minimum of what is attainable, to be fixed by the Faculty. 

5. Honors, not exceeding four, shall be conferred on such 
members of the Senior Class as shall be found worthy; — 
Provided, that no honor be given to any whose grade is less 
than a certain minimum on an attainable scale to be fixed 
by the Faculty. 



CHAPTER YIH. 



ORATIONS AND ADDRESSES. 

1. Declamations and exercises in Oratory shall be had 
every week, at such time and place as the Faculty may di- 
rect. These shall be assigned to the students in rotation ; 
3ior shall any student be exempt from them, except on ac- 
count of natural impediments or other disqualifications, of 
which the Faculty, or President, may judge. 

2. The orations pronounced b} T the Senior Class shall be 
of their own composition. 

3. On Commencement day candidates for degrees shall 
perform such exercises as may be assigned them, unless for 
satisfactory reasons excused by the Faculty. All the exer- 
cises of Commencement, the number of the students and 
the number of each department represented, shall be at the 
discretion of the Faculty. 

4. All original orations by Undergraduates to be pro- 
nounced in the presence of the^fleSj^c'&r' "#f the public, 
shall be submitted to the President for correction or appro- 
val at least ten days before delivery. 

5. Nothing indecent, immfcmLpr disrespectful to the Gov- 
ernment of the t!afie^%naTt aMiny time be delivered on the 
public stage, under penalty of such censure as the Faculty, 
or the Executive Committee, by their reference, shall judge 
proper. 



LAWS OF WEST VA. A(i. COLLEGE 



6. Xo person shall be mvitecLtojiddress the Societies, or 

the students of the ' fcotTcift^ upoYi anniversaries or other 
occasions, whose name has not first been submitted to the 
Faculty and received their approval. 



CHAPTER IX. 
RELIGIO US WOBSITIF and INSTR UCTION. 

1. Prayer and reading of the Scrip tures shall be had with 
the members of the 6^^tT'itTi i m^beginniiig of the exer- 
cises of each day of the week; on which services, and also 
<xn some approved public worship, all are expected to attend 
punctually and with due reverence. 

•1. Every student is required on Sabbath to abstain from 
all behavior inconsistent with that sacred day. 

•>. rA-ny studeiii.juiay be allowed to attend on Sabbatli the 
publie*s^vi^^f.*aj^dejioininaJti<an, -Q«t '..Christians havkio^i^ 
place of- worship in \l<>rg^ntown v on his application = to. tht - 
President in writing, if of legal age; or if a minor, on. the 
application of his parent or guardian, stating that such wor- 
ship is that in which he has been educated, or which front, 
conscientious motives he is desirous of attending. 



CHAPTER X. 



LITERARY AND OTHER SOCIETIES, 

1. The Literary Societies existing and approved at the 
time of the transfer of Monongalia Academy and Wood- 
burn Seminary to the State, shall be recognized and en- 
couraged. They shall be under the protection and control 
of the Faculty, and their property under the guardianship 
of the Board of Vioitoro . Xl>o?V^^Z« 

2. Other Societies for literary and religious purposes may 
also be authorized by the Faculty. 

S. Their meetings shall be at such hours as the Faculty 
may approve. 

4. They sliall have power to adopt any such regulations 
as they may think proper for the management of their 
business during the period prescribed for their meetings; 
except that it shall be unlawful to admit to their halls any 
of their members, whojiave 'bem expelled, dismissed or 
suspended from the J^^^f^dunKg the period of their sus^ 
pension or dismission. 



10 LAWS OF WEST VA. AG. COLLEGE. 

5. Resistance or disobedience to the requisitions and reg- 
ulations of the Faculty, by any Society, shall subject the 
same to the closing of their doors and suspension of their 
privileges by the Faculty. 

6. Secret societies or organizations among the students 
of the fc^S^g^a^^hdemnecl, and shall be discouraged, 
and the members thereof shall be subjected to such admo- 
nition and discipline as the Faculty shall deem best adapted 
to effect the abandonment and suppression of such organi- 
zations. 

— ^ -»« 



CHAPTER XL 



MATES OF TUITION. 

1. The charges for Tuition shall be, foii i Spoiling 1 , Rcnd - 
.km', Anting, Prirmry f-VnjrpT^y ™ r ^— u^~^i .» m. .rf^ 

for e ther studies in the Preparatory Department, five dollars 

r ($5.00) per Term ; and for the different departments in the 

fai^v^tMy (^ss5Ti3 roper, eight dollars ($8.00), per Term. 

2. The matriculation fees shall be, for the Freshman 
i Jlass two dollars ($2.00), the Sophomore Class, four dollars 
($4.00), the Junior Class six dollars ($6.00), and the Senior 
Class eight dollars ($8.00.) 

3. The contingent fee sball be, one dollar ($1.00) in the 
Preparatory Department, and two dollars ($2.00) in the Col- 
let Cla^sjsjiejt^erm. Each student must have a copy of 
the uuThjgd ^aAvs^to be furnished at cost. 

4. All fees shall be paid in advance at the beginning of 
the Term in which they fall due; and no student shall be 
admitted to recitation in any class, until he shall have 
handed in the Treasurer's receipt for such paymeuts. 



CHAPTER XII. 



MISCELLAXEO US. 

1. 2so student shall absent himself from any recitation ot 
his class without permission of the officer whose duty it 
may be to preside at that exercise: -jiot-shall he leave the 
immediate precincts of t h e Xulh^ ye vv rfem t the written per- 
mission of President or Vice President. 



LAWS OF WEST VA. AG. COLLEGE. 11 

2. Strict attention to the studies prescribed by the Faculty 

will be required, and habitual idleness will insure dismission 
from the college. 

3. Indecent and profane language, rude and boisterous 
conduct, tippling, frequenting taverns, inns, beer-jhous" 
places of mere idle amusement and resori of bad company, 
gambling, betting, games of chance, Bnioking tobacco within 
the college enclosure, or carrying concealed firearms or other 
deadly weapons, and every oth^r s]>eeies iA' vulvar and im- 
moral conduct, are absolutely forbidden, and will subject th< 
offender to punishment. 

4. No student will be expected to inform on a fellow stu- 
dent, nor to criminate himself, but when called on as a wit- 
ness in a particular offense, he shall be required to give full 
and true testimony. 

5. Any student may be privately dismissed, or suspended. 
or reprimanded, or required to apologize b}~ the Faculty for 
cause. Public expulsion shall be resorted to only in extrenn 
cases, and shall require a majority of the Faculty and Ex- 
ecutive Committee. 

6. General meetings of the students are prohibited, unless 
the consent of the President, Vice President, or a presiding 
member of the Faculty be obtained. Public meetings of 
any Class must be previously authorized by some member 
of the Faculty. 

T. No student shall lie p suspended or expelled un- 

til he has had the opportunity of explaining or defending 
his conduct before the Faculty; but thi±_ Faculty shall have 
power to dismiss from thc* 1 ^!*^ p^'ately, without the 
formalities of a trial, such students as arc habitually idle or 
disorderly, or whose example and influence are pernicious 
to others. 

8. Every member of the Graduating Class shall be present 
at Commencement, unless excused by the Faculty, for spe- 
cial and good .reasons. 

9. The (jp&ESpH^hvwy and all Museums of Curiosities, 
Coins or Minerals belonging to the fcsiSsg&^stTall be tinder 
the control of the Faculty, who shall appoint the proper 
custodians for the same, and ordain the necessary regula- 
tions for their keeping and use. ~ * r -^ 

10. Any Law or Ordinance of the Gelic^ may be repealed. 
amended, or temporarily suspended at any regular meeting 
of the Hoard of W&9>£*>/V}' ll majority of the Hoard. 



B 



5^^ -trs^s/gij: 

CATALOGUE 



of thi: 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



IX 



ffittl iVrirninin- flih 3bll«. 



WITH A STATEMENT OF THE COURSE OF INSTRUCTION 
IN THE VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS. 



1867-68 



MOBGANTOWN: ^ 

MORGAN A 11* TIM AX, PRINTEB& 

§ 186S. $ 






f 



BOARD OF VISITORS. 



: No. of District. Member of Board. P. 0. Address. 

1 T. II. LOGAX, Wheeling. 

■1 I). B. DORSET, Fairmont. 

3 GEORGE M.HAGANS,... Morgantovm. 

4 SAM'L BILLISG$LEY,...3L</<Iltbo>nn. . 

5 W. E. STEYEXSOX, Parkersburg. 

6 J. LOOMIS GOULD, Buckhannon. 

7 W. \V. HARPER, Po/„/ Pleasant. 

8 MARK POOR Wo. 

9 SAMUEL TOUSTG, Edray. 

10 JOSEPH T. HOKE, Mariinsburg. 

11 JAMES CARSKADOX,...Anr OwJfc. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 



Hon. WM. E. STEYEXSOX, President. 
Col. JAMES EVANS, Treasurer. 
GEO. C. STURGISS, Esq., Secretary. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 



Geo. M. Ha,gans, Chairman. 
Hon. John A. Dille. 
P. M. Durbin. 

ASHBEL FAIRCHILD, 

Geo. C. Sturgiss. 



sSS^2 /6K> ^ 



~*Ms&i 



WB8T \ IK'UNIA AG. COLLEGE. <5 



i 



Faculty and Teachers. 



Rev. ALEX. MARTIN, D. D., President 

AND PBOFESSOB 03? MENTAL AX)) MORAL SCIENCE. 

Rev. JOHN W. SCOTT, D. D., LL. D., Vice President, 

AND PROFESSOR OF LANGUAGES, 

FRANKLIN S. LYON, A. M.. 

PBOFESSOB OF ENGLISH LITER A TUBE AND PRINCIPAL OF TDK PREPARATORY 

DEPARTMENT. 



Col. J. R. WEAVER, A. M„ 

0FE8S0B <)P MATHEMATICS AND MILITARY TACT 

t 

SAMUEL G.' STEVENS, A. M.. 

\ 
PROFF— OK OP NATURAL SCIENCES. 

GEORGE M HAGANS, Esq., 

BUPEBINTENDENT OF GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS. 
PBOFESSOB OF MODERN LANGUAGES. 



ANT ENSTBUCTOB IN TUP PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 



OLIVER W. MILLER, A. M. 

-J [NSTRUCTOR IN THE PREPARATORY PUP. 

SAMUEL G. STEVENS, A. M, 

SB BET \ky or nn: p LCULTY. 

Col. J. R. WEAVER, A. M, 

LIBRARIAN. 



i 3 



3SW^-- 



WEST VIRGINIA AG. COLLEGE. 



Q 



■^sN^d/c^r 



STUDENT S. 



SOPHOMORES. 



Arnold, Eugene Hamilton Morgantown, W. V. 

! Dent, Marmaduke Herbert Weston, Lev:is county. 

FRESHMEN. 

Jolliff) William Elza White Day, Monongalia county. 

; Scott, John Work Churchtown, Lancaster county, Pa. 

, Snider, Elisha Eastern, Monongalia county. 

Wilson, Thomas Campbell Morgantown, W. V. 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

Adams, John Christian Wheeling, W. V. 

Allen, Guy Richards Champline Morgantown, W. V. 

Arnold, George William " " 

Babb, Charles Montgomery Locust drove, Grant county. 

Bailey, Marshall Flemington, Taylor county. 

Bailey, John William..' " " 

Barbee, Gabriel Thomas Maysville, Grant county. 

Blackshere, Elias Aaron Mannington, Marion county. 

Border, Daniel Webster Shepherdstown, Jefferson county. 

Boughner, William Leroy Morgantown, W. V. 

Bowlby, Charles John Mount Morris, Greene county, Pa. 

Bowman, William Thome Morgantown, W. V. 

Brown, Kobert Ludington " " 

Camden, John Squivner Weston, Lewis county. 

Carper, Wirt Dale Homme's Mills, Harrison county. 

Carter, Eldridge Meredith'* Tavern. Marion county. 

Cartwright, Isaac Taylor Morgantown, W. V. 

Chad wick, William Dering " " 

Chadwick, Richard Vincent " " 

Clayton, John Festus HoodsviUe, Marion comity. 

Collins, John Sivert Bruceton Milk, Preston county. 

Coombs, Leslie Stewarttown, Monongalia county. 

Conway, George BasurttrUle, Morion county. 

( Jourtney, Sanford Simmons Maidsville, Monongalia county. 

) Cox, William Henry South Macon, Macon county, III. 

\ • ;: T)orsey, William Morgantown, \Y. V. 

»-S) f 

0=U • 4 

^Q^^Q^S^ — ^tui 



IfEST VIRGINIA AG. COLLEGE. 



<3D 



Dille, Oliver I lagans Morgantown, W. E. 

Drabell, .John Henchell 

Evan-. William Linzey Sinn,, -1(1,1111, Monongalia aunty. 

Evans, Thomas Ray \forgantown, IT. I'. 

Evans, French Ensor u " 

Fast, Jonathan Wesley ForJaburg, Marion county. 

Finnell, Alexander Mortimer Morgantown, W. V. 

Fitch, James Plummet- " 

Fleming, Julian Evans " " 

Fleming, William Lazier Franklin, Venango county, Pa, 

Foreman. Charles P Bruceton Mills, Preston county. 

Guseman, .John Albert Morgantown, W. V. 

Hagans, George Harrison " M 

Hagans, Lucian Livingston BrandonvMe, Preston county. 

Hall. John Durbin Morgantown, W. V. 

Have- William Walter 

Harding, Noland Bruce Bruceton Mills, Preston county. 

Harner, George W " 

Haymond, William Morgantown, TE V. 

Hinkle, Amby • Mount Freedom, Pendleton county. 

Hoffman, Daniel Clarke Morgantown, W. V. 

Hooper, William Smith Grafton, Taylor county. 

Hopkins, Henry Clay Parhersburg, W. V. 

Howell, Fleming Morgantown, W. V. 

Howell. William Moses " M 

Huggins, John Wesley Bruceton Mills, Preston county. 

Ice, Edgar BarracksviUe, Marion county. 

Jacobs, Thomas Perry Tunnelton, Preston county. 

Jarrett. Absalom Morris Morgantown, IE. V. 

Jollify Joseph Clinton White Day, Monongalia coi 

John, Altha Franklin Stewarttown, Monongalia county. 

Keck, Julius Marcellus Morgantown, IE. E. 

Kincaid, George Washington " " 

Kin--. Elijah Daniel Webster Jackson ('. IT. 

Lazier, Andrew Foreman Morgantown, W. V. 

Lazzell, Samuel Courtney " " 

Lazzell, Thomas Allen.... 

List. Thomas Eugene Wheeling, W. V. 

Eow. James C Morgantown, IE. V. 

McAfee, Samuel Henry indy, Monongalia county. 

McGinnis, Elijah Piles Newberg, Preston county. 

McLane, Alan Elza Morgantown, IE V. 

McLaughlin, William Alexander Bellaire, Ohio. 

Madera, Charles Morgantown, W. V. 

Martin. James Virginius " " 

Mason. James H White Day, Monongalia county. 

*Mattingly, George Perry Paarhersburg, IE. V. 

Mattingly, Thomas Conley *• " ( 

Mays, Jacob William Forhsburg, Marion county. Z 

|> 




-~*N9 / 3/3S 



WEST VIRGINIA AG. COLLEGE. 



Merrill, Joseph Morgan Rivesville, Marion county. 

Moore, Charles Andrew MorgarUown, IF. V. 

Xicoll, James Walton Wheeling, TF. V. 

Onins, John Fletcher Morgantown, W. V. 

Osgood, George Kendall Oeredo, Wayne count}/. 

Pillsbury, Joshua Plummer Wheeling, TF. V. 

Pitzer, William Anthony Martinsburg, Berkeley county. 

Polsley, Edgar Atheling Point Pleasant, Mtuon county. 

Porter, William Franklin Grafton, Taylor county. 

Pratt, Edgar Woods Wheeling, TF. V. 

Price, John Evans Mooresrille, Monongalia county. 

Price, Thomas Horner 

Prichard, Charles Albert Mannington, Marion county. 

Prichard, William Taylor 

Protzman, Thomas Frederick Morgantoicn, W. V. 

Protzman, Lowell Mason 

Protzman, Ethelbert Jollifr' 

Purinton, Daniel Boardman 

Pnrinton, Aaron Lyon 

Purinton, George Dana " 

Reed, James Sansom Wheeling, W. V. 

Reppart, L. G Independence, Preston county. 

Rider, George Winfield Morgantown, IF. F. 

Riley, William Wirt Jackson, C. H. 

Ritchie, Samuel Hunter UnUmtown, Pa. 

Rogers, William Morganiown, W. F. 

Savers, Norman Willey Waynesburg, Pa. 

Shaffer, Perry Sylvanus, Grafton, Taylor county. 

Smith, Benjamin Wells Rifley, Tyler county. 

Smith, Clarence Linden Fairmont, Marion county. 

Stephenson, Andrew Clark Parkersburg, IF V. 

Steuart, Aaron Cromwell North Mountain, Berkeley county. 

Stewart, Alexander Milton Morris 1 X Roads, Fayette county, Pa. 

Tavener, James Parkersburg, TF. F. 

Taylor, James Marsh Wheeling, IF. V. 

Teter, William J. Worth Belington, Barbour county. 

Vance, James Cyrus Morgantoxrn, TF. V. 

Vaudervort, Thomas Ruble Boston, Monongalia county. 

Vanderyort, James William 

Vaudevvort. Homer Rosco ' 4 

Wagner, Caleb Edwin Morgantown, TF. F. 

Wagner, Allen Kramer 

Way. George 

Weaver, Bushrod Boston, Monongalia county. 

Wells, Elmore W Morgantoicn, IF. F. 

White. Israel JoUytotm. Greene county, Pa. 

Willey, John Byrne Morganiown, W. F. 

Wilson, James Lewis.. ., Grafton, Taylor county. 






Dismissed. 



^SS\ 



WEST VIRGINIA AG. COLLEGE. 

) g 

PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 



Baremore, C. W Morgantown, VV. V. 

Bright, (i. R Morgantown, VV. V. 

Bright, Simon Morgantown, W. Y. 

Ghadwick, David Morgantown, VV, A". 

( Sarraco, Marcellus Morgantown, \Y. V. 

Coburn, W. T Rosedale, Pa 

Drabell, B. 1 Morgantown, W. V. 

Drabell, Mti,^ Morgantown, \V. V. 

Deling, R. W Morgantown, W. V. 

Dering, II. S Morgantown, \Y. V. 

Dille, C. B Morgantown, \V. V. 

Fitch, I). P Morgantown, \Y. V. 

Fife, Cyras Morgantown, AY. V. 

Gilmer, M. J Morgantown, VV. V. 

Karmison, P. D Bridgeport, VV. \*. 

Hnstead, A. F Morgantown, AY. Y. 

Hagans, AY. L Morgantown, VV. \ T . 

Ilavt-. C. A Morgantown, AY. V. 

Hough, Walter Morgantown, AY. A'. 

Haymond, F. T Morgantown, AY. V. 

Hickman, I. N Morgantown, AY. A'. 

Hoffman, AY. K Morgantown, AY. A\ 

.Jenkins Leroy Morgantown, AY. Y. 

Kiger, Xorval Morgantown, AY. A' 

Kiger, Nye Morgantown, AY. V. 

Kinsley, John Morgantown, AY. Y. 

Kinsley, Joseph Morgantown, AY. A'. 

Kinsley, Ed Morgantown, VV. V. 

Millan, E Morgantown, AY. V. 

Morris, IT. 1* Morgantown, AY. V, 

Martin, .J. E Morgantown, AY. V. 

Martin, C. A Morgantown, VV. V . 

Madera, C. A Morgantown, AY. V. 

Madera, Mar-hall Morgantown, VV. A'. 

Mestuzat, Walter Morgantown, AY. V. 

McLore, McBurney Wheeling, \\ r . V. 

Odbert, Gilmore Morgantown, W. V. 

Porter, AY. N Morgantown, W. A'. 

Price, ( reorge Morgantown, AW V. 

Trice, Willie AI organ town, \Y. A'. 

Pickenpaugh, Samual Morgantown, \V. A*. 

Rogi re, Da i Morgantown, AY. A'. 

Rogers, I -co Morgantown, AV. A'. 

Kay, T. P Morgantown, AY. V. 

Beppert, William Nicholasville, Ky. i 

Repparfi, Frank Nicholasville. Ky. 6 

i 7 g) 

ovj^ ~«^§^ m 



?)\§ N e^^^- 



WEST VIRGIXIA AG. COLLEGE. 






<' 



Shanks, William.....' Morgantown, 

Stine, G. M Morgantown, 

Stine, Jacob Morgantown, 

Sisler, B. F Stewarttown, 

Sheets, Ely Morgantown, 

Sheets, Jerome Morgantown, 

Shay, John Morgantown, 

Shay, J. E Morgantown, 

Shean, Frank Morgantown, 

Vance, K. A Morgantown, 

Wade, C. X Morgantown, 

Wade, S. S % Morgantown, 

Wright, P. J Morgantown, 

Wilson, E. W Morgantown, 



W. V. 

w. v. 

W. V. 
W. V. 
W. V. 
W. V. 
W. V. 

w.v. 

W. V. 
W. V. 
W. V. 

W. A'. 
W. V. 
W. V. 



STATE 

John C.Adams, 1st District. 

J. Plummer Pillsbury,.. " 

Israel C. White, 2d District. 

John Hall, " 

William T. Bowman,.... 3d District. 

James L.Wilson,-. " 

Benjamin W. Smith,.... 4th District. 

Aaron C. Stewart, " 

John H. Drabell, Cth District. 

Marmaduke IT. Dent,... " " 



CADETS. 

j Edgar Polsley, 7th District. 

I George K. Osgood, 8th District. 

j William J. W.Teter,... " 

! George Eider, 9th District. 

Perry S. Shaffer, " 

: Daniel W. Border, 10th District. 

William A. Pitzer, " 

; Gabriel T. Barbee, 11th District. 

AmbvIIinkle " 



Israel White, 


Fourth 


do. 


John W. Bailey, 


Fourth 


do. 


James 0. Jolliff, 


Fifth 


do. 


Marshall Bailev, 


Fifth 


do. 



OFFICERS OF MILITARY CORPS. 

Captain ELDRIDGE CAKTER, Drill-Master in Infantry Tactics. 
Captain J. P. PILLSBURY, Drill-Master in Cavalry Tactics, 
Captain CLARENCE L. SMITH, Drill-Master in Artillery Tactics. 
James L. Wilson, First Lieutenant and Acting Adjutant. 
John W. Scott, Second Lieutenant. 
John C. Adams, First Sergeant. 

William A. Pitzer, Second Sergeant. 
Thomas C. Wilson, Second do. 
William T. Prichard, Third do. 

Next to those promoted as officers and sergeants the following have taken 
rank as First and Second Fire respectively, in progress, including exactness of 
movement, proficiency in Manual of Arms, and development of true soldierly j 
bearing: 

FIRST FIVE. SECOND FIVE. 



James W. Xicoll, 
John H. Drabell, 
Daniel W. Border, 
Marmaduke II. Dent, 
Charles M. Babb. 



Eugene H. Arnold, 
Benjamin W. Smith, 
Gabriel T. Barbee, 
James V. Martin, 
Aaron C. Steuart. 






-~*s*&®l 



U5\^e/^ 



WEST VIRGINIA AG. COLLEGE. 



(V) 



COLLEGE DRUM CORPS. 

Elijah P. McGinnis, Fifer, 

James V. Martin, do. 

Edgar W, Pratt, Tenor Drummer, 

James W. Nicoll, " 

Andrew P. Lazier, " " 

Noland B. Harding, " 

Thomas B. Evans, Baas Drummer. 



VOLUNTEER LABOR CORPS, 



John C. Adams. 
Charles M. Babb, 
William D. Chadwick, 
Marmadnke II. 1 tent, 
William W. Bayes, 
Lucian I>. I lagans, 
James V. Martin, 
J aims \V. Nicoll, 



William F. Porter, 
Charles A. Priehard. 
William A. Pit/.er, 
James S. Reed, 
John W. Seott, 
Benjamin W. Smith. 
William J. W. Teter, 
James W. Yandervort. 



NORMAL CLASS. 

Gabriel T. Barbee, Daniel B. Pnrinton, 

Sanford S. Courtney, William W. Riley, 

(ieorge W. Kineaid. Benjamin W. Smith, 

Elijah D. W. ICing, Aaron C. Steuart, 



James N. Mason, 

Joseph M. Merrill, 
Elijah P. Me< rinnis, 

( ieorge K. Osgood. 



Alexander M. Stewart, 
Israel White, 
James L. Wilson. 



RECAPITULATION. 

Sophomores, 2 

Freshmen, 4 

Preparatory Department 1 IS 

Primary Department (50 

184 



^Q\^~- 



~*s*<3 i: 



0^ 



■x^N^ 



WEST VIRGINIA AG. COLLEGE. 



Courses of Study, 



0> 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

FIRST "STIE^iR,. 

FIRST TERM. 
Geography, English Grammar, 

Arithmetic, First Lessons in Latin. 

SECOND TERM. 
Geography. • English Grammar, 

Aritnmetic, Latin Grammar and Reader. 

THIRD TERM. 
Arithmetic, English Grammar, 

Latin Grammar and Reader, First Lessons in Greek. 

SECOIsTD "3TDE^IR,. 

FIRST TERM. 
Csesar, Algebra, AVatts on the Mind, 

Greek Grammar and Reader, Physical Geography, 

SECOND TERM. 
Algebra, Greek Grammar 'and Reader. 

Cicero's Orations, History of the United States. 

THIRD TERM. 
Virgil, Anabasis, 

Geometry, History of the United States. 

Regular lessons in Latin and Greek Grammar from beginning, and in 
Writing, Spelling, Elocution and English Composition. 

LITERARY DEPARTMENT. 

FRESHMAN GLASS. 

FIRST TERM. 
Algebra; Greek Historians; Virgil; Geometry. 

SECOND TERM. 
Trigonometry and Spherical Geometry; Homers Iliad: 
History of English Literature. Virgil; 

THIRD TERM. 
Horace; Odes and Epodes ; Homer's Odyssey; Mensuration, Surveying 

and Navigation; Potter's Mechanic Arts. 
Lessons in Greek New Testament, Ancient Geography and Greek An- 
tiquities, and in Rhetorical Exercises throughout the year. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

FIRST TERM. 
Conic Sections and Analytical Geometry; Rhetoric; 
Xenophon's Memorabilia; Horace, Satire* and Epistles. 

SECOND TERM. 
Logic; Natural Philosophy, Mechanics; 

Plato's Apology and Crito; Anatomy, Zoology and Physiology. 

10 



IQResT^- 



•v^r^S/SJS 



WEST V lit.; IMA AG. COLLEGE. 



I 



THIRD TERM. ^ 

Inorganic Chemistry; Nat, Phil., Hydrostatics and Pneumatics; 

Differential and Integral Calculus; Livy. 

ns in Greek New Testament, Ancient Geography and Roman Anti- 
quities, and in Rhetorical Exercises, with Lectures, throughout the year. 
JUNIOR CLASS. 

FIRST TERM. 
Mental Philosophy; Organic Chemistry; 

Greek Tragedi* Flint and Emerson's Manual of Agriculture, 

BE4 OND TERM. 
Nat Phil., Electricity, Magnetism Mineralogy ^nd Geology. 

and Optics; Political Economy; Tacitus, Germania and Agricola. 
'i hum) TERM< 
Astronomy; Demosthenes <>n the Crown; 

Political Economy; Constitution of the United States. 

ns in Greek New Testament, in Composition and Declamation, and 
in Universal History, throughout the year. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

FIRST TERM. 
Moral Philosophy; Astronomy; 

Botany and Meteorology; Cicero De Officiis. 

SECOND TERM. 

Greek Tragedies; Guizot's History of Civilization; 

Butler's Analogy; Elements of Criticism. 

THIRD TERM. 

International Law; Natural Theology and Ev. Christianity. 

Languages Reviewed; Mathematics Reviewed. 

Forensic Exercises and Original Orations throughout the year. The 

Study of French or German is allowed as an equivalent for certain 

other branches at the option of the Student. 

SCIENTIFIC DEPARTMENT. 

FIEST YE^.^. 
FIRST TERM. 
Algebra: Geometry; Rhetoric; French. 

SECOND TERM. 

Trigonometry and Spherical Geometry ; History of English Literature ; 
Logic; French. 

THIRD TERM. 

Mensuration; Surveying and Navigation; Potter's Mechanic Arts ; 
French. 

SZECOHSTID YEAE. 
FIRST TERM. 
Conic Section- and Analytical Geometry, Manual of Agriculture, Mental 
Philosophy, German; Universal History. 
BEt OND TERM. 
2 Mechanics; Anatomy, Zoology and Physiology; Guizot's History of i 
$, Civilization; German; Universal Historv. fo 

£ U (?) 



^ WEST VIRGINIA AG. COLLEGE. 5} 

0) ■ — ■ ■ — ■ (6 

<P ■ THIRD TERM. w 

Inorganic Chemistry ; Astronomy; Natural Theology and Evidences of 
Chrisitanity ; Hydrostatics and Pneumatics ; German : Universal 
History. 

FIRST TERM. 
Organic Chemistry; Moral Philosophy; Astronomy; Botany and 
Meteorology. 

SECOND TERM. 

Acoustics, Electricity, Magnetism and Optics: Mineralogy and Geology; 
Political Economy ; Elements of Criticism. 

THIRD TERM. 

Political Economy ; Constitution of the United States ; Calculus ; Inter- 
national Law. 

AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT. 

PIEST YZELA^IR,. 
FIRST TERM. 
Manual of Agriculture : Physical Geography; History; French or German. 
Lectures on the Chemistry, Structure and Physiology of Plants, — on the 
Water, Atmosphere and Soil as related to Vegetables, — on Tillage, Draining 
and Manuring. 

SECOND TERM. 
i Anatomy, Zoology and Physiology; Mineralogy and Geology; History; 
French or German. Lectures on Domestic Animals and their Digestion, 
Respiration, Assimilation and Excretion, — on the Composition, Preparation 
and Value of different kinds of Food, — on Milk, Butter, Cheese, Flesh and 
Wool as Agricultural Products. 

THIRD TERM. 

Potter's Application of Science to the Mechanic Arts; History; French or 
German. Lectures on Horticulture and Kitchen Gardening, — on the 
Propagation, Training and Culture of Fruit Trees, the Vine. Small Fruits j 
and Vegetables, — Excurisons. 

SZECOZKTID ^TZE^IR.. 

FIRST TERM. 
, Botany ; Meteorology ; Rhetoric; French or German. Lectures on the Staple 
grain, forage, root and fiber crops of this and adjoining States and their 
varieties and the soils best adapted for them, — on the preparation of soil, 
seeding, cultivating, harvesting and preparing for market, — on the Origin 
and Natural History of Dome-tic Animals, — on Entomology and the Insects 
useful and hurtful to vegetation, — Excursions. 
SECOND TERM. 
History of English Literature; Logic; French or German. Lectures on the 
raising, care, characteristics and adaptation of different breeds of Domestic 
Animals, — on Cattle for beef or draught, and Sheep for wool or mutton, — 
( on Horse-, Swine and Poultry. — on pasturing, soiling and stall feeding, — on ( 
Z Tobacco, Hops and Forestry. Z 

<$ 19 ^ 



§ WEST VIRGINIA AC COLLEGE, 

$> , (5b 

C THIRD TERM. 

Constitution of the United States and of West Virginia; International Law; 
Natural Theology and Evidences of Christianity; Lectures on Rural Econ- 
omy, — on the History of Agriculture with sketches of the same in Ancient 

and Modem Times and Foreign Lands, — on the Adaptation of Panning to 
soil, climate, market and other Natural and Economical conditions, — on the 
different systems of Husbandry such as stock, sheep, grain and mixed farm- 
ing, — Excursions, 

MILITARY DEPARTMENT. 

The Course of instruction in this Department consists of Infantry, Artillery 
and Cavalry Tactics; the use of the Sword. Bayonet and Foil; Ordnance, 
Gunnery ; Military Engineering and the Science of War. 

INFANTRY TACTICS. 
The drill conforms to the system of Infantry Tactics established for the 
regulation ot the Army, comprising the Schools of the Soldier. Company and 

Battalion; the evolutions of the line, and manual exercise- of Light Infantry 
and Riflemen. 

CAVALRY TACTICS, 
Will comprise the School of the Trooper dismounted, of the Platoon and 
Squadron, and manual exercise of Sabre and Broadsword. 

AKTILLERY TACTICS, 
Will consi.-t of exercises of Field and Garrison Artillery; Manoeuvres of the 
Piece; and Target Practice. 

The Course occupies three years, and is distributed as follows: 

FIEST lZ:jZ2Ji_tt. 
FIRST TERM. — Infantry Tactics. — Organization and formation of Squad and 

Company: Pacing and Wheeling; March in Line and by Flank; Manual 

of Small Arms, and Target Practice. 
SKCOXD TERM.— Cavalry Tactics— Schools of the Trooper and Platoon 

dismounted ; Sabre drill. 
THIRD TERM.— Artillery 1 artics.— School of the Piece and School of the | 

Section; Nomenclature of the different parts of the gun, carriage, and limber; 

Manual of loading and firing blank. 

SIECOItTID ITIELA-IR,. 

FIRST TERM. — Practical Instruction in Infantry Tactic?, Organization of 
Battalion; Forming column in mass at half and fiid distances and reform- 
ing into line: forming and reducing square; Bayonet exercise; Zouave and 
Skirmish drill. 

SECOND TERM. — Practical Instruction in Cavalry Tactic?,- Organization 
and School of the Company and Regiment; Drill in Fencing with small 
and broad-sword. 

THIRD TERM.— -Practical Instruction in Artillery Tactics; Kinds and Com- 
position of projectiles; Calculation of distances and elevations by applica- 
tion of Trigonometry; Target practice with shot and shell. 

13 

6v*- . ~oa£\. o. 



§^'5 . £)N2/-^ "^S^S/SSS 

^ WEST VIRGINIA AG. COLLEGE. 

2 THIRD YEAB. ' ^ 

f FIRST TERM.— Theoretical and Practical Instruction in Infantry Tactics; ] 

Military Engineering and the Science of War; Military Organizations, 

Campaigning, and Strategy. 
; SECOND TERM.— Theoretical and Practical Instruction in Cavalry Tactics; 

Evolutions of the Regiment; Charge and Scout; together with the art of 

self-defense mounted and dismounted. 
i THIRD TERM.— Theory and Practice of Gunnery ; Review of the laws of 

motion of projectiles; Construction and adaptation of projectiles according 

to the distance and character of the object of attack. 

Dress Parades are held daily as often as the weather will permit. Inspee- 
• tions and Reviews are held weekly, or by Special Order as often as thought 
necessary. 

SCOPS OF THE COLLEGE. 

The Constitution of the State makes it the duty of the Legislature to "foster 
and encourage Moral, Intellectual, Scientific, and Agricultural improvement; 
and to make provision for the organization of such Institutions of Learning as 
the best interests of general Education may demand.'' The Act of Congress 
which, in part, endowed the College declares that its object is "to promote the 
liberal and practical Education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits 
and professions of life." The Board of Visitors appointed by the Legislature 
to organize the College were instructed to "establish such Departments of 
Education- in Literature, Science, Art, Agriculture, and Military Tactics, 
(including a Preparatory Department), as they may deem expedient and 
as the funds placed under their control may warrant." 

DEPARTMENTS. 

There are five of these, already, in operation. The Course of Instruction is 
necessarily modified by the condition of our schools. If all the children of 
the State had the advantage of good High School or Academic training the 
Studies of the College would be in advance of what they now are. The 
standard will be raised just a^ rapidly as it can be done without shutting out 

i from the College those who most need its advantages. 

The Preparatory Course is designed to meet the wants of those who are too 
young, or who are not sufficiently advanced to enter the other Departments. 
The Literary Course, in extent and exactness, corresponds to that of our best 
American Colleges. The Scientific Course affords a general preparation for 

| those pursuits which require extensive acquaintance with the Sciences. In 
the Agricultural Course special attention will be given to Agriculture, Horti- 
culture, Rural Economy, and the Mechanic Arts. The Military Course com- 
plies with the demands of the Act of Congress, and is arranged so as not only 
not to interfere with but to promote instruction and discipline in other studies. 
An Optional Course is allowed those students whose special tastes or necessities 
prevents them from graduating in any of the regular Departments. On its 
completion a certificate, showing the extent of the course pursued, will be 
granted. 



k, A Normal Class for the special advantage of Teachers is formed during the a 
V Spring Term. d? 

^ 11 ^ 



BS\£e^~ -tsNS^gg 



^ WEST VIRGIN! \ A». <'(>Ll.i 

=) 

TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission to any Department mu-t piv-cut satisfactory evi- 
dence of being morally, mentally and physically qualified to pursue to ad- 
vantage the Course of Study to which they propose to give their attention. 
If coming from other Colleges or Sigh Schools, they must present certificates 
of honorable dismission. All Students pledge themselves to obey the Rules 
and Regulations of the College. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Public Examinations, at which all the Students are required to b<- present, 
are held at the close of each Term. Also, in the regular College Cla<so. at the 
Close of each year, upon all the studies of that year. 

CALENDAR. 

The College Year consists of thirty-nine weeks, divided into three Terms of 
thirteen week- each. An interval of ahout one week occurs between the first 
and second, ami between the second and third Term-. Also a recess of one 
week at Christmas. Students are received at any time, but it is exceedingly 
desirable that they he present at the opening of the Term, as the exercises 
begin promptly on the day appointed, and any time lost affects the standing 
of the Student. Term- and vacations for the College Year 1868-69, begin 
and end a- follows, viz: 

September 1. Fall Term begin?. 
November "2T. " " ends. 



December 7. "Winter Term begins:. 


March 


6,1869, " " ends. 


March 


1">. " Spring Term begins. 


June 


15, " Annual Meeting of Board of Visitors 


Jane 


lti, " Spring Term ends. 



TERMS OF TUITION. 

Primary Classes, payable in advance, >:>.00 

Preparatory" " " 5.00 

Collegiate " " " 8.00 

Students in the Preparatory Department pay one dollar, in the other De- 
partments two dollars per term ( 'ontingc.it fee. Two ( ladets may be appointed 
by each Visitor from hi- District free of charge for tuition, hook-, or stationery. 

BOARDING, 

including everything except lights and washing, can he had in the College for 
$3.50 per week. Some of the Teachers, also, occupy part of the building. 
Boarding in town varies from $3.00 to $4.00 per week. 

DISCIPLINE. 

A record is kept by the Faculty, in which are enter d the grade of Scholar- 
ship of each Student, his absence from the exerdbi Institution, and 

I such other fact- a- arc worthy of notice with respect to hi? e ' •' deportment. 1 
j) An abstract from this record is -cut at the close of each T< rm t>> parents and (j 

10 g) 



WEST VIRGINIA AG. COLLEGE. % 

. _ . _____ | 

guardians so that they may see what, and how their sons or wards are study- o* 
ing, and how they stand in scholarship and deportiner t. In case of negli- 
gence, irregularity, or other misconduct the Student will he privately admon- 
ished and the parent or guardian will be informed of the fact. Mere inattention 
to study will, if persisted in, insure dismission from College. No Student is 
allowed to leave the College precincts, during Term time, without special 
permission. 

Students from abroad under fifteen years, should have their money sent to, 
and their bills settled by Col. Weaver, Registrar of the College. 

RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTION AND WORSHIP. 

The exercises of each day are opened with reading the Scriptures and prayer, 
at which all the students are required to be present. They are also required 
to attend regularly some place of religious worship on the Sabbath, and on all 
occasions to treat the institutions of religion wkh respect. 

LIBRARY. 

A respectable beginning towards a College Library has already been made. 
We respectfully request the friends of Education to make contributions to its 
shelves. Also to collect and forward specimens suitable for a Museum, and for 
Cabinets of Natural History and of the Natural Sciences. Such contributions 
will be thankfully received, carefully preserved, and the date of reception, 
whence procured, and the name of the donor permanently attached to them. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are two of these in connection with the College, furnished with suita- 
ble Halls, and whose exercises of Composition, Reading, Orations, Debate, 
and Criticism are, in many respects, of great advantage to the student. They 
also afford facilities for the study of, and for acquaintance with, parliamentary 
forms, and the acquisition of business habits. The authorities of the College 
will afford every facility for increasing the accommodations and usefulness of 
these valuable auxilliaries. 

LOCATION. 

Morgantown, the seat of the College, is beautifully located on the right bank 
of the Monongahela river, Monongalia county, West Virginia. The scenery 
around is exceedingly attractive and picturesque. The place lias long been 
famous for its social, intellectual and moral culture, and general healthful ness. 
Coaches leave every morning to and from Fairmont, on the Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad. There is also a daily conveyance between Morgantown and 
Uniontown, Pa. Steamboats from Pittsburgh arrive every day at Geneva, 
twelve miles below Morgantown. A place more eligible for the quiet and suc- 
cessful pursuit of Science and Literature is no where to be found. 



g92/S*v^ ■ ' — ^- 



5) 



< ATALOGIE 






OF Til E 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



IN 









THE COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



A GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE INSTITUTION. 



1869-TO. 




MORGAN TOWN: 

MORGAN & HOFFMAN, PRINTERS. 

18G9. 



&g/£^- 



(p 



38S®* 
g 



|5o;tri) of iicqcnts 



17*3 






Ko. of District. 


Member of Board. 


P. 0. Address. 


1 - 


- - 


T. H LOGAX, - - - - 


Wheeling. 


2 - 


- - 


Hon, F. H PEIRPOIXT, - 


- Fairmont. 


3 - 


- - 


GEORGE M. HAG ANS, - 


- Morgantown. 


4 - 


- - 


SA3PL BILLINGSLEY, - 


- Middlebourne, 


5 - 


- - 


Hon. A. I. BOREMAX, - 


- Parker sburg. 


- 


- - 


J.LOOMIS GOULD, - - 


- Buckhannon. 


7 - 


- - 


W. W. HARPER, - • 


- Point Pleasant, 


8 - 


- - 


MARK POOR, - - 


- Cere do. 


- 


- - 


SAMUEL YOUXG, - - 


- Ed ray. 


10 - 


- - 


J A MES CA RSKA D OX, - 


- New Creeh. 


11 - 




JOSEPH T. HOKE, - - 


- Marti nsburg. 



OFFICERS OF TnE BOARD. 



President. 



Col. James Evans, Treasurer. 
Geobge C. Siurgiss, Secretary. 






EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 



Geo. M. Hagans, CJuiirman. 
Hon. John A. Dille, 
F. M. Durbin, 

ASHBEL FaIRCHILD, 

Geo. C. Sturgiss, 

Alex. Martin. 



-^L. c 



&S^*~ ~*-N3&3B- 

3 ® 

r eg? 



"WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



JF aculin ant> (L -caxbcrs. 



IIkw ALEX. MARTIN, P. D., President, 

AND PROFESSOR OF MENTAL AND MORAL SCIENCE. 

F. S. LYON, A. M., Vice President, 

PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH LITERATURE, AND PRINCIPAL OF 
PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

Col. J. R. WEAVER, A. M., 

PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS AND MILITARY TACTICS. 

SAM TEL G. STEVENS, A. M., 

PROFESSOR OF NATURAL PHILOSOPHY AND OF THE NATURAL 
SCIENCES. 

HENRY M. HARMAN, D. D., 

PROFESSOR OF ANCIENT AND MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE. 

OLIVER W. MILLER, A. M., 

i-TANT IN THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

A. G. ALCOTT, 

TEACHER OF ELOCUTION. 

GEORGE M. IIAGANS, Esq., 

SUPERINTENDENT OF GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS. 

HUGH W. BROCK, M. P., 

LECTURER ON PHYSIOLOGY AND HYGIENE, 

Hon. JOHN A. DILLE, 

LECTURER ON CIVIL AND CONSTITUTIONAL LAW. 

SAMUEL G. STEVENS, A. M., 

SECRETARY OF THE FACULTY. 

Col. J. R. WEAVER, A. M., 

LIBRARIAN. | 

s3c/§^^ '**/*§'&*l 



Si§\§ s e/^~ -tf^2/S^ 

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 5 ^ ' 



STUDENTS. 



Cticnun geprtmeni 



i 



UNIOK 



Dent, Marmaduke JIeieoert Wirfon, Jx....* * 



'PKOMOKES. 

Jolliff, William Elza White Bay, Monongalia county. 

Snider, Elisha Boston, 

Wilson, Thomas Campbeli Morgan/awn, " 



Skeskmen. 

Border, Daniel WEBSTER Frederic!: City, Maryland. 

Drabele, John JIj :.- hell, Narcjantovcn. 

LorciiERY, Daniel Carson Cherry Camp, Harrison county. 

McLane, Alan Elza MorgoMtovm. 

Porter, Wll UAM FRANKLIN Grafton, Taylor county. 

Pukinton, Daniel Boabdman Morgantovm. 

Smith, Benjamin Wells ..Ripley, Tyler county. 



Scfottnfit department. 



First «6xass. 

T '.x- ; ' 

Dille, Oliver IIagans Morgantovm. 

Evans, Thomas Kay 

f^ Hall, John Dubbin " (^ 

ffl$f&^ -^ in 



SSSvS^*- • -tsN^'jjg 



^ 6 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



'? 



ireparatorg gepndmcnt. 



Adams, John Christian.... Wheeling, 

Allen, William Stone > Uaiontown, Pa. 

Allen, Charles Barton " fi 

Allen, Guy Richards Champline.. Morgantoizn, 

Allender, Joseph Shuttlesworth " 

Anderson, John Coombs . Easion, Monongalia county. 

Arnett, William Jerome ^ArnettsviUe, " " 

Babb, Charles Montgomery Locust Grove, Grant county. 

Bailey, Charles Edwin Whet 

Bailey, Thovnsberry Emm Flemington, Taylor county, 

Basnett, Elza Leroy Morgantown. 

Billmyer, William Hammond Shep) Jefferson county. 

Boughner, William Leroy..... Morgantown. 

Bowlby, Charles John Mount Morris, Greene county, Pa. 

Bowman, William Thorne .Morgantown. 

Boyers, James Ess Randall, Monongalia county. 

Bradford, Alexander Ashley Washington, I). C. 

Brown, William Andy, Monongalia county. 

Burns, Miller Btewart Fairmont, Marion county. 

Caldwell, Benson McMeehen MoundsvUk, Marshall county. 

Caldwell, Joseph Bailey Wheeling. 

Carlile, William Dorsey Clarksburg, Harrison county. 

Carper. Wirt I>ale Romine's Mills , u 

Carter, Eldridge ..Meredith's Tavern, Marion county. 

Chadwick, Richard Vincent Morgantown. 

Chadwick, David t; 

Cobnn, William Sanford " 

Coffman, William Taylor Lcwisburg. Greenbrier tourtiy. 

Coleman, Elijah Chalfant MargcaUown. 

Combs, Leslie Slewarttoivn, Monongalia county, 

Conway, George Basnettsville, Marion county. 

Coombs, Charles Easton, Monongalia county. 

Coombs, Scott " 



it&&^> 



'^^sli 



*o ~^~ -^>- g 

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 7 



Cox, James Alfred irnettsville, Monongalia county. 

I tavidson, Eldon Flemington, Taylor c mnty. 

Dean, George Albert Wheeling. 

Ikvii. John Shreaves ^\' i 1 1 i ;i t n Buckhannon, Upshur a 

riler, Henry Eff Pennsville, Fay( /'</. 

Dille, Clarence Brown [fo 

Dillon, William James Wheeling. 

Dix, Daniel Worth NicltoUu Court-House. 

Dolliver, Jonathan Prentiss Granville, Monongalia county. 

Dolliver, Robert 

Duval, Waller Kuhn Wellsburg, Br ' nty. 

Etchison, William Peaco Fort Laramie, Dacotah Territory. 

Fast, .Jonathan Wesley Forksburg, Marion county. 

Fitch, James Plummer Morgantown. 

Fleming, Julian Evans " 

, William Hoy Beverley, Randolph county. 

Forman, Charles P Bruceton, Preston county. 

I Iharles Ridge Far/.:, Vermillion county, III. 

Glass, Woodward Wheeling. 

.1, Franklin Augustus Wayne Cox 

Hagans, Lucian Livingston BrandonviUe, Preston county. 

Hagans, G Harrison Morgantown. 

.i is, William Lucian " 

Harding, Noland Bruce Bruceton, Preston county. 

Hart, Charles < 'larksburg, Harrison county. 

Hayes, "William Walter Morgantown. 

Clarksburg, Harrison county. 

Hewitt, Christian Linton, Jefferson county, Oh 

Hillory, William Sanford Wadestown, Monongalia county. 

Hoffman, Danii 1 Clarke Morgantown. 

Howell, Allei Wheeling. 

Howell, William Moses Morgantown. 

Huggins, John Wesley Bruceton, Preston county. 

Jacobs, Thomas Perry Tunnelton, " " 

Jollift", Joseph Clinton White Day, Monongalia county. 

Jolliff, Jacob Clayton " 

h John, Altha Franklin Stcivart'own, " 

^ John, Frank " " 



afey&6^~ -^»S\£^ 



SfoSte'*- ^^2/S)^? 

^ 8 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

_ . . . ^ 

Kincaid, George Washington Morganloivn. 

Kincaid, John Wesley " 

King, Elijah Daniel Webster Jackson Court-IIouse. 

Koontz, Winfield Scott Easton, Monongalia county. 

List, Thomas Eugene Wheeling. 

List, Ambrose Shaw " 

Logic, John Harry Kemeysville, Jefferson county. 

Lynch, Hiram Jr Brown's Creek, Harrison county. 

Lynch, Charles Wesley " 

Martin, James Virginius Morgantown. 

Martin, John Errian " 

Martin, Winfield Scott Farmington, Marion county. 

Mason. James White Day, Monongalia county. 

Merrill, Joseph Morgan Bivesrille, Marion county . 

Morgan, Benjamin Stephen Laurel Point, Monongalia county. 

Morgan, William Asbury Mannington, Marion county. 

McClure, Taylor Bascom Louisa, Laurence county, Kentucky. 

McEwen, Jacob Alexander New Concord, Muskingum county, 0. 

McKee, Henry Franklin Brandonville, Preston county. 

McLure, Harry Wheeling. 

McRa, Waitman Clinton Mills, Monongalia county. 

Nicoll, James Walton Wheeling. 

Orr, Harry " 

O-good, George Kendall Ccredo, Wayne county. 

Paden, William Mervin Sardis, Monroe county, Ohio. 

Paden, George Edwin " 

Park, John Wesley Hedges Capon Bridge, Hampshire county. 

Peirson, Edgar Pee Triadelphia, Ohio county. 

Pitzer, William Anthony Martinsburg, Berkeley county. 

Powell, Thomas Flemington, Taylor county. 

Pratt, Edgar Woods Wheeling. 

Price, Thoma3 Horner Mooresvillc, Monongalia county. 

Prichard, Charles Albert Mannington, Marion county. 

Prichard, William Taylor " " 

Purinton, Aaron Lyon Morgantown. 

llader, Archibald Fleming Summcrsville, Nicholas county. 

Rafferty, James Cole Scwickly, Allegheny county, Pa. 

Flay, Thomas Patrick Morgantown. 

ggg/^v*^ -^»S\£fig 



^\§N2^ ~*N93/g8g 

§ WEST VIRGENLA D N I VKKSITV. 9 (^ 

> Reed, James Sanson) Wheeling. 

Reed, James Madison Morgantovm. 

Kider, George Winfield " 

Rogers, "William " 

Boraback, John Zebulon ilbion, Orleans county, JSf. Y. 

Schaefler, Gustavus Cresap Kingwood, Preston county. 

Simmons, David Floyd Weston, Lewis county. 

Smith, Clarence Linden Fairmont, Marion county. 

Smith, Winfield William Bruceion, Preston county. 

Stansberry, Stephen White Day, Monongalia county. 

Steele, Israel Milton '.... " " 

Steele, William Edgar Fairmont, Marion county. 

Stenart, Aaron Cromwell North Mountain, Berkeley county. 

Stewart, Cassius Milton Wheeling. 

Sturgiss, Adoniram Judson Smithficld, Fayette county, Fa. 

Tarr, Clarence Campbell WeUsburg, Brooke county. 

Tarr, Hammond 

Temple, Marcellus Luther Wadestown, Monongalia county. 

Teter, William Jay Worth Belington, Barbour county. 

Thrasher, William Marshall Piedmont, Mineral county. 

Vance, James ( W rus Morgantown. 

Wagner, Allen Kramer " 

Way, George 

Weills, Solomon Franklin Oakland, Md. 

White, Israel Jollytown, Greene county, Fa. 

Willey, John Byrne Morgantown. 

Wilson, William Columbus Quitman Smithtown, Monongalia county. 

Woods, Jacob Sherman Shriver Wheeling. 

Woodward, James Lawrence " 

Worley, Jesse Lee Blachville, Monongalia county. 

Young, Francis Reed Cherry Camp, Harrison county. 



m&&^- 



><~^u& 




m$&^ ^^JE? 

^ 10 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. (g. 



State Cadets, 

<y IV 



John C.Adams, 1st District. 

Joseph B. Caldwell, •' 

Israel C. White, 2d District. 

John D. Kail, 

William T.Bowman; 3d District. 

John W. Huggins, 

Benjamin W.Smith, 4th District. 

Aaron C. Steuart, 

Walter II. Duval, 5th District. 

u u 

Cliarles A. loster, 

John H. Drabell, Gth District. 

Marmaduke H. Dent, 

William M. Paden, 7th District. 

Daniel W T . Dix, 

George K. Osgood, 8th District. 

Franklin A. Golden, 

George Eider, 9th District. 

Archibald F. Kader, 

Charles M. Babb, 10th District. 

u U 

Clarence L. Smith, 

Daniel W. Border, 11th District. 

William A. Pitzer, 



3 



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82S\§^»~ -^N^/ggj* 

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 11 <§^ 



Officers of |§£ilitaky :Cokps. 



William A. Pitzeb, Adjutant. 



COMPANY A. 

Clarence L. Smith, Captain. 

Thomas C. Wilson, 1st Lieutenant. 

i U, 2d Lieutenant. 

William E. Jolliff, 1st Sergeant. 

Benjamin W. Smith, 2d Sergeant. 

Israel C.White, 3d Sergeant. 

Daniel W. Border, 4th Sergeant. 

William F. Porter, , 5th Sergeant. 

'. Nicoll, Drummer, 



COMPANY B. 

John C. AJan is, Captain. 

Marmaduke H. Dent, 1st Lieutenant. 

Daniel B. Purinton, 2d Lieutenant 

Alan E. McLane, 1st Sergeant. 

Franklin A. Golden, 2d Sergeant. 

Benson McM. Caldwell, 3il Sergeant. 

John W. Hoggins, 4th Sergeant. 

William P. Etchison, 5th Sergeant. 

George A. Dean, ,.. Drummer, 



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,~*^$6f§ 



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ft!) 



'•^«n^3/2JJ« 



12 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



I^OLVNTEEK WABOK SfSottPS. 




Miller S. 


Burns, 






William T. Coffman, 




Richard "\ 


T. Chadwiek, 




Oliver IL Dille, 






Charles P 


. Forman, 




N. Bruoe 


Harding, 




James V- 


Martin, 




Milton J. 


Steele, 






Clarence C. Tarr. 




IftOHMAI 


(Blass. 


Joseph 5. Aliender, 






Benjamin S. Morgan, 


John CL Anderson, 






George E. Paden, 


William J. Arnett, 






Daniel B. Purinton, 


William T. Coffi 




Aaron L. Purinton, 


James A. Cox, 






Gustavus C. Sehaeffer, 


John S. W- Deen, 






Daniel F. Simmons, 


Daniel W. Dix, 






Winfield W. Smith, 


William IL Foggy, 






Stephen Stansberry, 


William S. Hillory, 






William E. Steele. 


George W- Kineald, 






Adoniram J. SturgisjH, 


Elijah D. W. King, 






Israel White, 


Hirg.ni Lynch, Jr., 






William C. Q. Wilson 


James IL Mason. 






Francis IL Young. 


Waiiman McEa. 









^CAPITULATION. 

Junior, .... 1 

Sophomores, 3 

Freshmen, 7 

Scientific Department, , 3 

I Preparatory Department, 140 

§gg/g^\>- ^^S&l 



|gg\§v*- -un£/" ■ £: 

)§\ WEST VIRGINIA 1 XI VEB6ITT. 13 



§mim rf Sitt8ri. 



^ 
¥ 



prcp;ir;itarn gcpiutntcni 



FIRST YEAR. 

FALL TERM. 

Geography — Guyot's Com, Sch. ; Map Drawing, 
Arithmetic — Robinson's Prog. Pract. 
English Grammar — Etymology. 
Latin — Commenced. 

WINTER TERM. 

Geography — Ouvot Continued ; Map Drawing. 
Arithmetic — Continued. 
English Grammar — Syntax. 
Latin — Grammar and Reader. 

SPRING TERM. 

Arithmetic — Completed. 

English Grammar — Analysis of Sent*/ -. 

Latin — Grammar and Reader. 

Greek — Bullion*' First Le»soii3. 



[g/g^s^ ,....^iy^ r> 



I 






g\S«^- • >^N^g 

14 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Jv 



^KEPARATORY 3&XPAHTMENT. 



S ECO XI) TEAK. 

FALL TERM. 
Algebra — Robinson's New Elementary, to Involution. 
Watts on the Improvement of the Mind, 
Caesar: Latin Grammar. 
Greek Grammar and Reader. 

WINTER TERM. 

Algebra— Elementary Completed. 
History of the United States — Wilson's. 
Cicero's Orations — Bullions'; Latin Grammar. 
Greek Grammar and Reader. 

SPRING TERM. 
Geometry — Robinson's First Five Books. 
History of the United States — Completed. 
Virgil — Three Books of JEneid; Latin Grammar. 
Xenophon's Anabasis ; Greek Grammar. 
Regular Lessons in Writing, Spelling, Elocution and English Composi- 
tion from the beginning. 



(J) <3) 

gJ@/©^3- -^»S\SSS 



gjS\?>e/^~ ~^?/g^ 

^ WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 15 g 






^iterarn Department. 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 

FALL TERM. 

Virgil — jEneid; Arnold's Prose Composition. 
Herodotus; Lessons in Greek Grammar. 
Algebra — Robinson's University. 
Geometry — Robinson's, commencing at Book VI. 

WINTER TERM. 

Virgil — Bucolics and Georgics; Arnold's Latin Prose Composition. 

Homer's Iliad; Check Grammar. 

Spherical Geo!, etry and Trigonometry. — Robinson's. 

Shaw's Manual of English Literature. (Smith's Edition.) 

SPRING TERM. 

Horace — ( kies and Epodi . 

Hot!!. '•'- I > lyssey; Arnold's Greek Prose Composition. 
Mensuration, Surveying and Navigation. — Robinson's. 
Botany — Gray's School and Field Book. 

- in Greek New Testament, Ancient Geography and Greek An- 
tiquities, and in Rhetorical Exercises throughout the year. 






£' C^*^ , ~-<lSSy 



9m 






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^ 16 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. ^ 



3£lTXKARY ^IPAKTMXNT. 



SOPHOMOBE CLASS. 

FALL TERM. 
Horace — Satires and Epistles. 

Xenophorvs Memorabilia ; Arnold's Greek Prose Composition. 
Conic Sections and Analytical Geometry. — Robinson's. 
Rhetoric — W hatch's. 

WINTER TERM. 
Plato's Apology and Crito. 
Logic. — Coppee. 

Potter's Science applied to the Practical and Mechanic Arts. 
Physics — Inorganic Chemistry. 

SPRING TERM. 
Livy — Lincoln's. 

Differential and Integral Calculus. — Looniis's. 
General History. — Webber's. 
Physics — Organic Chemistry. 
Lessons in Greek New Testament, Ancient Geography and Roman Anti- 
quities, and Rhetorical Exercises, with Lectures, throughout the year. 






'- ^— l/M 



■JiS^— -^2/SS' 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 17 .. 



I 



TEKAKY *&EPARTMEMT, 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

FALL TERM, 

Euripides — Alcestis. 

Mental Philosophy. — Haven's. 

Agriculture — Flint and Emerson's Manual. 

Physics — Mechanics and Solid State of Matter, 

WINTER TERM. 

Tacitus — Germania and Agricola* 
Political Economy. — Perry, 
Physics — Astronomy. 

" Hydrostatics, Pneumatics and Acoustics 

SPRING TERM. 

Demosthenes on the Crown. 
Constitution of the United States. 
Physics — Astronomy. 

11 Optics, Heat and Electricity, (Silliman'a Physics.) 

Lessons in Greek New Testament, in Composition and Declamation, ;'.nd 
in Universal History, throughout the year. 



C6) <^> 

£&2/S^~ ~*^§@E& 



• UpS^^ -tfN^gJJs 

^18 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. ^ 



Literary Department. 



SEXIOIi CLASS. 

TALL TERM. 
( lieero Pe Officiis. 
Moral Philosophy. 

Physics — Dana's Geology ; Mineralogy. 
Human Anatomy and Physiology. 
Zoology — Lectures. 

WINTER TERM. 
Sophocles — CEdipus Ty ran mis. 
Butler's Analogy. 
Guizot's History of Civilization. 
Elements of Criticism. 

SPRING TERM. 
Natural Theology and Evidences of Christianity. 
Internationa] Law. 
Languages Reviewed. 
Mathematics Reviewed, 
orenfic Exercises and Original Orations throughout the year. The 
Study of French or German is allowed as an equivalent for certain 
other branches at the ontion of the Student. 



i 2 



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5 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Scientific Department, 



FIRST YEAR. 

FALL TERM, 
German — Aim's Method. 
Robinson's University Algebra. 

Geometry, — Book VI, and remaining ones. 
Rhetoric — Whately. 

WINTER TERM, 
< rerman — Aim's Method. 
Trigonometry and Spherical Geometry. 
Shaw's Manual of English Literature 
-Coppee. 

SPRING TERM. 
< ierman — Adler's Reader. 

iration, Surveying and Navigation. 
- School and Field Book of Botany. 
titution of the United State.-. 



»8 



ij^'j 



G^9^, 



Co5 



!2J§\§^/-2r~ ~«~\9 / J/(E;I£? 

ZS\ 20 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. "f2 



fSciKKTiriC #EPARTMXNT. 



SECOND YEAR. 

FALL TERM. 

French — Fasquelle's French Course. 

Conic .Actions and Analytical Geometry, 

Flint and Emerson's Manual of Agriculture. 

Mechanics, and the Solid State of Matter. (Silliman'a Physics.) 

WINTER TERM. 

French— Fasquelle, (completed.) 
Political Economy. — Perry, 
Inorganic Chemistry. 
Hydrostatics, Pneumatics and Acoustics. 

SPRING TERM. 

French — Dumas' Napoleon. 

Differential and Integral Calculus, — Loomis's. 

Organic Chemistry. 

Optics, Heat and Electricity. 



^f^g^SV*-, '**>€€&£ 



ISS v 5 s e^- ~«vK2/ci-ES 

^ WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 21 §] 



SCIENTIFIC ^EPAftTMXNT. 



THIRD YEA It. 

FALL TERM. 

Mental Philosophy — Haven 1 a 

Moral Philosophy. 

Anatomy ami Physiology; Zoology. 

MiinTalogy and Geology. 

WINTER TERM. 

Guizot's History of Civilization. 

Elements of Criticism. 

Science Applied to the Domestic and Mechanic Arts. 

Astronomy* 

SPRING TERM. 
International Law. 

Natural Theology and Evidences of Christianity. 
Astronomy, completed. 
Mathematics Reviewed. 



1 

z%2/&^~ -> -«^§SR: 



Ih^S^^^ -^^S/S^ 

£§ 22 WE6T VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. g\ 



||Ii(itarn llepavtment 



FIRST TEAR, 
FIRST TERM. — Infantry Tactic*. — Organization and formation of Squad and 

Company; Facing and Wheeling; March in Line and by Flank ; Manual 

of Arms, and Target Practice. 
SECOND TERM. — Cavalry Todies. — Schools of the Trooper and Company 

dismounted; Sabre drill. 
THIRD TERM.— A rtiUery Tatties.— School of the Piece and School of the 

Section ; Nomenclature of the different parts of the gun. carriage, and 

limber; Manual of loading and tiring blank. 

SECOND YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. — Practical Instruction in Infantry lactic.*, Organization of 
Battalion; Forming column in mass at half and full distances, and re- 
forming into line; Forming and reducing the Square; Bayonet exercise; 
Zouave and Skirmish drill. 

SECOND TERM. — Practical Instruction in I raeties; Organization 

and School of the Squadron and Evolutions of the Regiment; Drill in 
Fencing with Foil and Broad-sword. 

THIRD TERM.— Practical Instruction in Artillery 'Parties; History and 
Manufacture of Gunpowder; 'Construction and Classification of Ordnance 
and Projectiles; Target Practice with Shot and Shell. 

THIRD YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. — Military Engineering.— Topography ; Description and 
and Construction of Field Work- and Permanent Fortifications; Mining; 
Military Roads and Bridj 

SECOND TERM.— Science of Gunnery.— Review of the Laws of Motion 
of Projectiles; Application of Trigonometry to Calculation of Distances; 
Kinds, Elevation, Time and Range of Fire; Adaptation and Effect of 

Projectiles to the distance and character of the object of attack. 

THIRD TERM.— Art of War.— Military Organizations; Strategy illus- 
trated by History; Grand Tactics. Military Law. — Articles of War; 
General Army Regulations; Courts-Martial and Military Commissions. 

DRESS PARADES are held daily, as often as the weather will permit. 
Guard-Mounting, Inspections and Reviews are held weekly or by Special 
Orders as often as expedient. 



(I 

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v^sn^;- g- 



g WEST VIRGINIA DK1VERSITT. 23 . 



■A GRICULTURAL B EPAHTMENT, 



°j 



FIRST YEAR. 

FALL TERM. 

Geometry; Manual of Agriculture ; 

Anatomy, Physiology and Zoology. 

Lectures on the < chemistry, Structure and Physiology of Plants : on the Water, 

Atmosphere and Soil as related to Vegetables; on Tillage, Draining and 

Manuring. 

WINTER TERM, 
uiomctry and Spherical Geometry; Inorganic Chemistry; 

History of English Literature. 
I on ] imals and their Digestion, Respiration, Assimila 

and Excretion; on the Composition, Preparation and Value of dil 
kind- of Food; on Milk, Butter, Cheese, Flesh and Wool as Agricultural 
Prod 

RING TERM, 
miration and Surveying; Organic Chemisl Botany. 

ires on Horticultural and Kitchen Gardening; on the Propagation, 
Training and Culture of Fruit Tree.-, the Vine, Small Fruits and - 
tables; Excursions. 

SECOXD YE Alt. 

FALL TERM. 

Geo! Moral Philosophy; Book Keeping. 

1 ires on the Staple grain, forage, root and fibre crops of this and adjoining 

rieties and th< adapted for them; on the 

,i of - it. seeding, cultivating, harvesting and preparing for 

market: on the Origin and Natural History of Domestic Animal-: on 

Entomology and th< I i'ul and hurtful to vegetation ; Excursions. 

WINTER TERM. 
Mechanic Arts; Political Economy; History of Civilization. 

Lectures on the raising, care, characteristics and adaptation of different breeds 
of Domestic Animals; on Cattle for beef or draught, and Sheep for wool 
or mutton; on Horses, Swine and Poultry; on Pasturing, Soiling and 
Stall Feeding; on Tobacco, Hops, and Forestry. 



^24 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



7 



SPRING TERM. 
Constitution of the United States and of West Virginia ; 
International Law ; General History. 

Lectures on Rural Economy ; on the History of Agriculture with sketches of 
the same in Ancient and Modern Times and Foreign Lands ; on the 
Adaptation of Farming to soil, climate, market and other natural and 
economical conditions; on the different systems of Husbandry, such as 
stock, sheep, grain and mixed farming ; Excursions. 



TABULAE VIEW OF THE EXEKCISES for THE YEAR 1869-70.* 



| Class. I 9-9J 



>3— m | io.]— iii i 



11 



5 Fresh. Math. Alg. Greek. 

J3 Soph. Greek. Mathematics. 

^ Jus. Agriculture. Mental Philos. 

3s Sex. Latin. Technology. 



Math. Geom. 


Latin. 


Latin. 


Rhetoric. 


Chemistrv. 


Greek. 


Ethics. 


Astronomy 



5 Fresh. Mathematics. Latin. jEng. Literature. Greek. 
.C Soph. Chemistry. Greek. Anat. and Phys Logic. 
" JON. Latin. Physic-. Polit. Econ. Astronomy. 
T, Sen. Sutler's Anal. Hist. Civ ilization. Greek. Criticism. 

g Fresh. Latin. Botany. Mathematics. Greek, 

.c Sopii. History. Mathematics. Latin. Chemistry. 

" J ln. Astronomy. Greek. Physics. Const. U. S. 

S Sex. Mathematics. Xat. Theology. Internat'l Law. 

The First and Second Classes of the Scientific Department will recite French 
in the afternoon and their other lessons at the hours mentioned in the Tahle 
for the various studies. 

Students in the Agricultural Department witt recite with those classes so 
long as their number does not warrant separate provisions for them. The 
hours for recitation in the Preparatory Department will be determined upon 
from term to term. Instruction and Drill in the Military Department occupy 
the last hour of the afternoon. 



*The arrangement of Studies in this Table, varies slightly from that laid 
down in the Course of Study, so as to meet the necessities of the present 
Classes which have partially completed the Course as formerly published. 
-o Possiblv it may be necessarv'to vary from it sometime during the year. 

j§g/I^->~ ^SSKS 




gjS&V^- 

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



ORIGIN AND SCOPE OF THE UN 1 1 E IISITY. 

The subject of advanced Education ha-; been in various forms before the 
people of West Virginia for years, but without any liberal provision having 
been made for the same until quite recently. The Constitution of the State 
makes it the duty of the Legislature to "foster and encourage Moral, Intellectual, 

Scientific, and Agricultural improvement; and to make provision for the organiza- 
tion of sueh institutions of learning as the best interests of general education mag 
demand." The National Congress having donated certain lands "in order to 
promote the I iberal and practical education of the industrial dosses in the several 
pursuits and professions in life" the Legislature accepted the same, and appoin- 
ted a Board to organize the Institution, with instructions to "establish Depart- 
ments of Education in Literature, Science, Art, Agriculture, and Military Tactics — 
including a Preparatory Department" 

The proceeds of the sale of Congressional lands amounted to 90,000 dollars. 
The citizens of Morgantown contributed in grounds, buildings and money 
about 50,000 dollars. The Legislature, realizing the necessity and immense 
value of such an Institution; its incalculable worth to the youth of the Com- 
monwealth and of the country — scores of whom, in ever increasing numbers, 
have resorted to its Halls — has generously appropriated 1G.000 dollars per 
year for the further endowment and for the current expenses of the University, 
having, pursuant to the formal recommendation of the Governor and in har- 
mony with the design and scope of the Institution, changed its name from 
"The Agricultural College of West Virginia," to that of "West VIRGINIA 
University." We trust that in the extent and in the quality of its work, 
and the thoroughness of its discipline and culture, as well as adaptation to the 
demands of the age, it will prove itself deserving of no second rate position 
among the Institutions of our land. It designs by its instruction in Literature 
and Art — in Language, ancient and modern — in Mathematics, pure and applied 
— in the Sciences, physical, mental, moral and social — by its recitations, lec- 
tures, examinations and elevating influences to educate, inform and discipline 
the Student's mind; to strengthen his moral principles, and supply such gen- 
eral and generous as well as special culture as will best prepare him for 
success and usefulness in whatever pursuit or profession may be his life- 
work. 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION. 

There are five of these already in operation. 

1. Preparatory, designed to meet the wants of those who are too young, or 
who are not sufficiently advanced to enter the other Departments. 

2. Literary, in extent and exactness corresponding to that of our best Amer- 
ican Colleges. 

3. Scientific, which affords a general preparation for those pursuits that 
require extensive acquaintance with the Sciences. 

4. Agricultural, embracing the various branches of Agriculture, Horticul- 
ture, Rural Economy, and the Mechanic Arts. 




.~^aS\£fg 



ytft)\Sji*Sb^ -^3-3,®^- 

Sg 26 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. J*. 

I ; 

y 5. Military, which is arranged so as not only not to interfere with, but to 
promote, instruction anil discipline in other Departments. 

Lectureships in Civil and Constitutional Law, and in Physiology, Hygiene 
and related subjects have also been established. 

An Optional Course is allowed those Students whose special tastes or ne- 
cessities prevent them from graduating in any of the regular Departments. 

A Normal Class, for the special advantage of Teachers, is formed every 
Spring. In this the ordinary school studies are carefully reviewed, exactness 
and readiness in explanation and definition acquired, and instruction in the 
most approved methods of organizing and conducting schools imparted. The 
Trustees of the Peabody Fund have furnished aid to various young men who, 
through this Department, are seeking to qualify themselves for higher useful- 
ness as Teachers. 

TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission to any Department must present satisfactory evi- 
dence of being qualified to pursue to advantage the Course of Study to which 
they propose to give their attention. If coming from other Colleges or Uni- 
versities they must present certificates of honorable dismission. An accurate 
acquaintance with the studies required for admission to any Department is 
indispensable in order to receive the full advantage of the Course. Every 
Student admitted to a class higher than the first year must be examined on 
the previous Studies of ihe Class which he desires to enter. 

EXA MINA TIONS. 

Three public examinations, at which all the Students are required to be 
present, are held during the year,— one at the close of eacli Term. These 
maybe conducted by written papers or by oral questions. Reports of the 
Deportment and Scholarship of the Students are sent to the par nts or guar- 
dian after each examination. 

CALENDAR. 

The Annual Session of 39 weeks is divided into three Terms of 13 weeks 
each. An interval of a few days occurs between the Fall and Winter, and 
between the Winter and Spring Terms. Also a recess of a week or ten days 
about Christmas. It is highly important that Students be present at the first 
recitation of their classes. The exercises begin promptly on the day designa- 
ted, and any time lost affects the standing of the Student and perhaps embar- 
rasses his whole course. Students entering after the Term has opened must 
take such studies as can be conveniently assigned them. 

1869. June 10, Annual examination begins. 

" Jui e 13, Annual Discourse by the President. 
" June 14, Prize Contest. 

" June 15, Address before the Societies by Hon. W. E. Stevenson. i 
T - „ f Commencement, and laying the Corner Stone of the ^ 
June 16 { new University Hall. ' g 

sjas/a*^ ~^§\S5§ 



IJj !>&es*~ ^rsSf [ 

^ WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. _7 



1869. September 7, Fall Term begins. 
December .'!, " " ends. 

" December 7, Winter Term begins. 

M December 2.'!, Christmas recess begins. 

1870. January 5, M " ends. 
" March 17, "\\'i i it c-i- Term cuds. 

March 22, Spring Term begins. 
M Jane 1(>, " " end*. Commencement Day. 
EXPEXSES. 

Preparatory Department, $5.00 per Term of 13 weeks. 

Other Departments, 8.00 " 

Students in the Preparatory Department pay one dollar, in the other De- 
partments two dollars per term contingent fee. 

Two Cadets may be appointed by each Regent, free of charge l"r tuition, 
books or stationery. Boarding varies from $3.50 to $ 1.00 per week. 

ritizEs. 

The following prizes have been established, viz: 

I. To that member of the Volunteer Labor Corps who, without neglecting 
his other studies, shall have shown himself, practically and scientifically, m -t 
efficient in the cultivation of the ground assigned him. $25. To ll 
and third in merit, $15 and $10 respectively. The prizes to be awarded under 
tiic direction o( the Superintendent, by a committee of citizens appointed by 
the Executive Committee. 

II. To the Student who shall wzite the best Essay upon a given subject, 
To the Student who Bhall he adjudged the best Declaimer, $15. These prizes 
to he adjudged after public competition by a committee i appointed 
by thi 1 'acuity. 

III. To the Student who shall be adjudged by the Faculty to excel in 
■ ral deportment, $25. To the second in merit, sir,, if preferred the prizes 
may he given in the shape of medals, time-pieces, or books. 

The Trustees of the "Peabody Educational Fund" have also, through tin ir 
General Agent, Dr. Barnas Scars, placed at the disposal of the University the 
sum of hive Hundred Dollar-, to he given to such young men of ih,- Normal 
1 >■ p rtment a- may he in need of aid, and who will engage in the profession 
of Teaching in this State. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The Rules of the University require that every Student i>;<i( he in his 
place at all stated exercises from the opening to th. ids connection 

with the University. A record is kept in which are entered tin 
Scholarship of each Student, his absence from theea fthe Institution, 

his tardiness, or failure in recitation, unless satisfactorily accounted for. An 
L abstract from thi- record i- -< m at tin close of each Term to parents or guar- 
$ dians bo that they may see what, and how their sons or wards are studying, 
£) and how they stand in scholarship and deportment. Jn ease of negligence, 

jJJ^/g^sv^- ~4>a 



§£S\Sn^ ^w$/$l 

^ 28 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



irregularity, or other misconduct, the Student will be privately admonished 
and the parent or guardian will be informed of the fact. Mere inattention to 
study will, if persisted in, insure dismission from the University. No Student is 
allowed to leave the town during Term time, without special permission. 

Students from abroad under fifteen years, should have their money sent to, 
and their bills settled by Col. Weaver, Registrar of the College. 

RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTION AND WORSHIP. 

The exercises of each day are opened with reading the Scriptures and 
prayer, at which all the Students are required to be present. They are also 
required to attend regularly some place of religious worship on the Sabbath, 
and on all occasions to treat the institutions of religion with respect. 

LIBRARY. 

A respectable beginning towards a University Library has already been 
made. About a thousand volumes have been carefully selected and placed 
on its shelves, including not only, many choice and valuable books of refer- 
ence, but also standard works in the various departments of History, Biogra- 
phy, Theology, Agriculture, Art, Science and General Literature. 

We respectfully request the friends of Education to make contributions 
to its shelves. There have been received the following donations of books to 
the Library, viz: 

From the Office of Secretary of State: volumes. size. 

Constitution and Statutes, 1861-1868 3 

From Adjutant General's Office: Reports, 1864-60 2 

From Rev. W. A. Hooper: 

Baxter's Works, 4 8 vo. 

Cousin's History of Modern Philosophy 2 12 mo. 

Tennyson's Poems 2 12 mo. 

From R. B. Carr, Esq.: Congressional Globe 2 4 to. 

From Hon. W. T. Willey : 
Several Packages of Congressional Documents 40 

From Stephen Shepley, Esq., Fitchburg, Mass.: 

Agriculture of Massachusetts, Flint 4 8 vo. 

Fitchburg, (Massachusetts,) in the War 1 8 vo. 

Hoogeveen's Lexicon of Greek Idioms, in vellum, (Pub- 
lished in 1766 1 8 vo. 

Whitby on the New Testament, 2 Folio. 

Dr. Lymon Patrick's Paraphrases, 1 p ublished in 1765 4 Folio< 

Commentary — William Lowths, j 

Annual Reports of Worcester North Ag. Society 4 

From Alexander L. Wade, Esq. : 
Railroad Map of the United States and Map of the World.. 

From Han way & Lorentz : 

Allen'g American Biographical Dictionary- 1 8 vo. a 

Alexander's Moral Philosophy 1 12 mo. & 

Prince of House of David 1 12 mo. Q~ 

[g/g^*~ -^s^Jsi 



lh@§v*~ ~*vfK2/S;KI 

^ WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 29 gj 

2 * 

T VOLUMES, SIZE. V 

Life of John Fitch, J 12 mo. 

Teacher Teaching, ] 12 mo. 

Writings of Andrew Broaddus, 1 12 mo. 

New Themes for Prot. Clergy, 1 12 mo. 

Memorial of Mrs. Breckinridge, 1 12 mo. 

American Merchant in Europe, 1 12 mo. 

Mendelssohn's Letters from Italy 1 12 mo. 

,, ,,r ,. i Public Documents 281 

from Washington: . . . , .., , . . 

° j Congressional Globe 10 

From Major J. II. Bristor, Wheeling, West Va. : 

Casey's Infantry Tactics 3 16 mo. 

McClellan's Bayonet Exercise, 1 12 mo. 

From Rev. J. W. Scott, D. D. : 

Rev. Robert Bairn Works 3 8 vo. 

(food's Book of Nature, : 1 8 vo. 

From American Unitarian Association, Boston : 

Theological and Biographical 40 8 vo. 

From Smithsonian Institute: 

Smithsonian Contributions 15 4 to. 

Meteorological Observations 4 4 to. 

Miscellaneous Collections 7 8 vo. 

Smithsonian Annual Reports 4 8 vo. 

From Rev. G. W. Arnold: 

Christian Dictionary, i Published in 1655,) 1 8 vo. 

History of Slavery 1 8 vo. 

Dymond'a Moral Science 1 12 mo. 

From Kev. J. I). Onins: 

Dick's Works 1 8 vo. 

From Eld. Wright, Secretary of State, Iowa: 

Law Reports, Vol. XXII ' 

From Hon. J. C. McGrew: 

Memorial Addresses on Life and Character of Hon. Thad Stevens. 

Agricultural Reports, 1867. 

From Kev. Henry M. Ilarman, D. D. : 

Nautical Almanac, 1868. 

To purchase Books for the Library: 

Hon. John A. Dille, $200 00 

Col. James Evans, 200 00 

George M. Hagans, Esq 100 00 

William Wagner, 25 00 

Hon. W. T. Willcy, 100 00 

John II. Hoffman, 100 00 

I Alexander Martin, 100 00 i 

jj) George C. Sturgiss, 50 00 Q 

<£) Alexander L. Wade, 20 00 (P 

£35/&^~ ~^?SX: 



1 




|§\S v 6 / ^ > ' 

80 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

Copies, also, of the Daily Wheeling Intelligencer, of the Tri-weekly Wheeling 
Register, and of nearly all the weekly journals in the State, as well as of sev- 
eral from other State?, have been cheerfully donated to the Beading Room of 
the University. We trust these are but the beginnings of larger gifts. We 
earnestly call upon our friends everywhere, and especially upon the citizens of 
our own State, to aid us in collecting and forwarding to their University sam- 
ples of any thing rare and valuable in the animal, mineral or vegetable king- 
doms, or any thing serving to illustrate the antiquities, natural or civil history, 
geology, botany, mineralogy, &c, of the State, or any section of the State or 
the world. 

M USE UM A ND A PPARA T US. 

A beginning has also been made in procuring valuable Apparatus for the il- 
lustration of Mechanics, Hydrostatics, Acoustics and Chemistry. A superior 
Theodolite for surveying, leveling, and civil engineering, and also an excel- 
lent Microscope, and other Apparatus, have been secured. Specimens in 
Mineralogy, Zoology, the Molusca, and Artieulata have been procured. Also 
a small Cabinet of Fossils, &c. We request the friends of Education to col- 
lect and forward specimens suitable for the Museum, and for Cabinets of Natural 
History and of the Natural Sciences. Such contributions will be thankfully 
received, carefully preserved, and the date of reception, wher.ee procured, and 
the name of the donor permanently attached to them. 

Donations have been received during the past year a> follows: 
Spirifera and fossil roots in Limestone, from Lexington, Ky., presented by R. 

W. Hazlitt, M. D., Ohio county, West Virginia. 
Stalagmites. &c., from Weyer's Cave, and specimens of Marble from the She- 
nandoah Valley, by Rev. J. W. Webb, Wheeling, West Virginia. 
Eighty mounted Microscopic objects and specimen-, principally Diatomaceae 

and infusoria, from the Microscopic Society of West Virginia, through Dr. 

Ed. Rocking. Corresponding Secretary. 
Lepidodendron, presented by Mrs. Dr. Dent, Granville, West Virginia. 
Specimens of Marbles from Tennessee, Iowa, Spain, The Pyrenees, and Egypt} 

by G. W. Prickett, Chicago, Illinois. 
Fossilliferous Limestone, President A. Martin. 
Petrified Stump of a Tree, Monongalia county, by II. W. Brock, M. I)., Mor- 

gantown, West Virginia. 
Singular Breccia found on Cheat river, by Rev. J. B. Blakeney, Morgantown. 
Petrified Wood, found on Cheat river, by Mr. Wm. Dancer, of Morgantown. 
Petrified Wood, found on Cheat river, by B. Marsteller, of Morgantown. 
Slips of Olive Wood, &c, from the Garden of Gethsemane, near Jerusalem, 

by Joseph Seybokl, Esq., Wheeling, West Virginia. 
Revolving Map, by Alexander L. Wade, Esq., Morgantown. 
Shells, Stones, &c, from different parts of Asia, Africa, and Europe, by Joseph 

Seybokl, Esq. ( 

k Coins, —Russian, Turkish, Greek, Italian, Bavarian, &c, copper, silver and / 
C^ mixed, by Joseph Sevbold, Esq. Q} 

(?) w 

rKS®*^ -^n&SRs 



a§£*"~ ~™®3x& 

^ WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 31 ^ 

Twenty-five Silver, Copper, &c., ( oins, mostly American, and of various dates, 7 

by William Phillips, Wheeling. 
Moss Agates, from Black Hill Range, Rocky Mountains, Dacotah Territory, 

by William S, Cobun, Morgantown. 
Cross-Cul Saw. used in building Fort Henry, (where Wheeling now stands, 

in 1777. donated to Soldier's Fair in Wheeling, by Th. G. Culbertson, Esq., 

and purchased at close of the Fair by I>r. •). < . Hupp, of that city, and by 

him presented to the State University. 
Antique Belt, &c., from the effects of the late Mrs. L. Cruger, near Wheeling, 

presented by Mrs. Judge Caldwell, Moundsville, West Virginia. 
Cheyenne Arrow, shot into the Stage Coach near Ft. Lyon, New Mexico in 

the Summer of 1868, presented by T. R. Willey, Morgantown. 
One pair Antlers from an American Deer, presented by Ceo. M. Elagans, Esq., 

Morgantown. 
Very beautiful specimens of Fossil Fern Leaves, by Miss Qattie L. Dering, 

Morgantown. 

ral Specimens of Copper Ores from the Lake Superior region, by C. 1 . 

Smith, Fairmont, West Virginia. 

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND 
TACTICS. 

The National endowment of the University requires provisions to be made 
for instruction in Military Tactics. The Board of Regents has provided the 
facilities for carrying out these obligations. Experience has demonstrated 
the wisdom of the plan and has proved it to be a very popular and attractive 
feature to Students. 

The Ordnance and Ordnance Stores, furnished by I have been con- 

stantly employed, as occasion demanded, and are as well cared for, as is pos- 
sible, in the absence of a a li table A rmory. 

The Course of Instruction embraces Infantry, Cavalry, and Artillery Tac- 
tic**; the iiEe of the Bayonet, Sword and Foil; Ordnance and Gunnery; 
Military Engineering, and the Scienc< of War. 

The Drill conforms to the system of Tactic-, established foi the regulation 
of the United States Array. Attendance upon the ej made obligatory 

upon Cadets, and the regular University classes, unless exempted therefrom, 
1 \ the Faculty . for adequate ca 

A full Uniform has been adopted for theCad< 1 . to i made after the Uni- 
versity pattern, ban is far as may be, the • 

- . . . rally worn. J' n is also recommended to all 

who particip itc in the Drill. 

The Students are arranged into classes or companies, and officered from 
those who are the most pi ttained the highest rank in ex- 

actness of movement, and true soldierly bearing. The exercises occupy one 
\ hour d lily, on the 'afternoons of Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday 
£g» of each week, at limes not to conflict with regular recitations. r£) 

(f §A 

.C : OJ^ ^JLS&Ks-Cipft 



7j\&e,'*~ ^\^2/3JJ? 

^ 32 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. ^ 



£ 



During inclement 'weather and throughout the winter months, the exercises 
are conducted in the large University Hall, which affords a fine opportunity 
for drill in the use of the Sabre, Sword and Foil. 

In the Department of Military Science, instruction is given in the form of 
class lectures on the subjects of Science of Gunnery, Military Engineering, and 
the Art of War. During the past year this last feature has been successfully 
inaugurated. 

The salutary effect of a Military Education, in addition to the knowledge 
obtained, is seen in the more erect carriage, graceful manner, and physical 
development of the Students. The Drill has largely taken the place of plays, 
which have little or no special advantage, and some of which are of evil ten- 
dency. It has furnished the indolent or too studious youth with a measure 
and kind of exercise which, to such, is invaluable, while the not unfrequent 
presence of ladies and other spectators, at parade, stimulates all to the at- 
tainment of the highest excellence in a service which may some day be greatly 
advantageous to the State. It would be wrong to suppose that its physical 
advantages, however obvious and great, are its only recommendations. The 
habits of attention, precision and ready obedience which it requires and 
strengthens, and the generous spirit of healthful emulation which it fosters, 
find expression in every other department of study. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are two of these in connection with the University, furnished with 
suitable Halls, and whose exercises of Composition, Reading, Orations, Debate, 
and Criticism are, in many respects, of great advantage to the Student. They 
also afford facilities for the study of, and acquaintance with, parliamentary 
forms, and the acquisition of business habits. The authorities of the Univer- 
sity will afford every facility for increasing the accommodations and usefulness 
of these valuable auxiliaries. 

LOCATION. 

Morgantown, the scat of the University, is beautifully located on the right 
bank of the Monongahela river, Monongalia county, West Virginia. The 
scenery around is exceedingly attractive and picturesque. The place has long 
been famous for its social, intellectual and moral culture, and general health- 
fulness. Coaches leave every morning to and from Fairmont, on the Balti- 
more and Ohio Eailroad. There is also a daily conveyance between Morgan- 
town and Uniontown, Pa. Steamboats from Pittsburgh arrive every day at 
Geneva, twelve miles below Morgantown. A place more eligible for the quiet 
and successful pursuit of Science and Literature is nowhere to be found. 



k 

iS^^" ■ ^-^^Si 






c ylAL0G£7£ 

or r 1 1 1 : 

OFFICERS AND STUDENTS, 



IX 



WEST VIRGINIA 

rMYERSITl, 



WITH THE 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



AND 



A> GENEKAL DESCRIPTION OF THE INSTITUTION. 

1869-70. 




MOBGANTOWN: 

Morgan t tioflni&n. Book and Job Printex 

1S70. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



jnoanl of jpfltfe. 



No. of District. 


Member of Board. 




P. O. Address. 


1 


. . . 


T. H. LOGAN, .... 




Wheeling. 


2 


. . . 


Hon. F. H. PEIRPOINT, 


- 


Fairmont. 


3 


. . . 


GEORGE M. HAGANS, - 


- 


Morgantown, 


4 


. . . 


SAM'L BILLINGSLEY, 


- 


Middlebourne. 


5 


. . . 


Hon. A. I. BOREMAN, - 


. 


Parkersburg. 


6 


. . . 


J. LOOMIS GOULD, - - 


- 


Buckkannon. 


7 


. . . 


W.W.HARPER, - - - 


. 


Point Pleasant. 


8 


. . . 


J. S. WILKINSON, - - 


- 


Hamlin. 


9 


- - - 


SAMUEL YOUNG, - - 


- 


Edray. 


10 


. . . 


JAMES CARSKADON, - 


- 


New Creek. 


11 


- - - 


G. M. BELTZHOOVER, 


* 


Shepherdstown. 






Officers of the Board. 


Ipti t 



Col. James Evans, Treasurer, 
George C. Sturgiss, Secretary. 



Executive Committee. 



Geo. M. Hagans, Chairman. 
Hon. John A. Dille. 
E. H. Coombs. 

ASHBEL FAIRCHILD. 

Geo. C. Sturgiss. 
Alex. Martin. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 3 


Jfarultii and jTeattera, 


Rev. ALEX, MARTIN, D. D., President, 

And Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 


F. S. LYON, A. M., Vice President, 

Professor 1 f English Literature, and Principal of Preparatory Department 


s. G. STEVENS, A. M., Secretary, 

Aiul Professor i f Astronomy and Physics. 


II. II. PIERCE, A. M., Bvt. Capt. U. S. A., 

Professor of Mathematics and Military Tactics. 


J. J. STEVENSON, A. M., Ph. D., 

Professor of Chemistry ami Natural History. 


F. W. AVOOD, A. M., Ph. D., 

Professor of Ancient and Modern Languages. 


0. W. MILLER, A. M., Tutor. 


D. B. PURINTON, 

Tutor in the Preparatory Department. 


GEORGE M. HAGANS, Esq., 

Superintendent of Grounds and Buildings. 


HUGH W. BROCK, M. D., 

Lecturer on Physiology and Hygiene. 


Hon. JOHN A. DILLE, 

Lecturer on Civil and Constitutional Law, 


Capt. II. II. PIERCE, A. M., 

Registrar and Librarian. 


A. G. ALCOTT, Teacher of Elocution. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



IIVBIII 



nemsr (| lass. 

Dent, Makmaduke Herbert Weston, Lewis Cotmfy 



Junior (i 



;i!i. ( i. 



Jolliff, William Elza > Whiteday, Jlonongalia County. 

Snider, Elisha Eadon, " " 

Wilson, Thomas Campbell Morgantown, " " 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science. 

Dille, Oliver Ha- ans ., Morgantown, Monongalia County. 

Z 



^opliomorc 



fta. 



Border, Daniel Webster Frederick City, Maryla.'nd. 

Drabell, John Herschell Morgantoim. 

M'Lane, Alan Elza ^ " 

Smith. Benjamin- Wells. -~ -^Ripley,. Tyler County, 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 5 


fosfenaB 

Adams, Jons- Christian. 

Babb, Charles Montgomery 


...Wheeling, Wed Va. 

...Ijii Grant County. 


Bowman, William Thoene 

Bullock, Edmund Tanner.- 

Carter, Eldridoe 


... Morganh 

...Pa Va, 
„ Meredith'* Tavern) Marion County. 


Fast, Jonathan Wesley.- 

LeDWITH, WlLLIAM LAURENCE 

Purinton, Aaron Lygx 

Til CL VREWE LlXl>EX 


'nrr h 
<*ville, Pa. 

..Fairmont, Mori 
... Waa\ mgalia County. 
.~JoUytov;n, Greene County, Pa 

chelor of Science. 

£& Mills, Harrison County. 
..Morgant" 

.^.Bridgporf, Harrison County. 
.. 11 ayu. ( ''-lu-t-Jl 
..Lrucctnn, i nty. 
-..Clartebura, II 
.. MorgmUown. 
. ]( heeling. 

..Parkersbv.rg, Wood County 
..Louisa, Lawrence Co., Ay. 
.. < [ ml, . Waym ' ' ■'■nty. 

nty. 
.. Wheeling. 

Students. 

. / . , 

\unty. 
■ ton, Presto 
..Morgontoim. 
..HarnsvilU, RUi 
.. Idnten ■'■ 

"■a County. 
^Morgantown. 

„Brandonville, J dy. 
..MartbuibiLrq, Berkeley County. 


Temple, Marcellus Luther 


White, Israel. 

For the Degree of Ba 

Carper, Wirt Dale- 

Chadwick, Richard Vincent 

Duxrin, James ; 

LDEN, 1- i:\XKI.IX An,U>TI's 

Harding, Noland Bruce_ 

HATMONB, Lewis 

HUFFMAN, LaXIFI. Cl.AKKE 

Lie , And seShaw.. 

Mattixgly. George Perry 


McClure, Taylor Bascom 

Osgood, Gbobob Kendaxj 

Eader, Arciiibali J' leming 

Woods, Jacob shj ebhan Shbiyeb 

University I 

Anderson, John 1 qombs 

Edmtbton, Theodoric Granyille 

Forman, Charles 

Hall, Jmix I Mfbix 


Harris, John Fhomas 

Hewitt, Christian.. 

John, A LTH v FfiJ HE i in.. ~ 

Lazzell, Thomas Axleh 

McKee, JIfxry Fraxklix 

Pttzeb, William Anthony 


1 





WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



;Wtipfon| |tpi<kcnt 



Adams, Samuel Shugart . Washington, D. C. 

Allen, "William Stone Uniontown, Fayette County, Pa. 

Allen, Charles Barton " 

Allen, Guy Eichards Champline Morgantown, West Va. 

Allender, Joseph Shuttles worth " " " 

Arnett, Franklin..... , Hoodsville, Marion County. 

Arnett, "William Jerome Arnettsville, Monongalia County. 

Bailey, Charles Edwin Wheeling, West Va. 

Basnett, Ferdinand Samuel Morgantown. 

Beatty, Eichard Henry East Liberty, 

Berkeley, Cincinnatus ...Middlebourne, Tyler County. 

Bettler, Joseph.... ... Brownsville, Pa. 

Birtcher, Calvin Luther Randall, Monongalia County. 

Boughner, "William Leroy Morgantown. 

Bowers, John Henry Laurel Iron Works. Monongalia Co. 

Bowman, John "Wesley Shaw New Interest, Randolph County. 

Boyer, Ami ... .Bra.ndonvillc, Preston County, 

Buyers, "William Thomas Randall, Monongalia County. 

Boyers, James „. .., i: 

i Brandt, John Banyan Oakland, Allegheny County, Md. 

Brookover, Jcsephus ...... West Warren, Monongalia County. 

Brown, William Andy, Monongalia County. 

Brown, Bobert Ludington. .....Morejantovn. 

Brown, William Gay.. .. Kingvsood, Preston County. 

Butler, Alexander ...Kearneysuille, Jefferson County. 

Caldwell, Joseph Bailey Wheeling, West Va. 

Carskadon, George Thomas New Creek, Mineral County. 

Casteel, Truman Whitfield Oakland, Allegheny County, Md. 

Chadwick, Jeremiah Thompson Springfield, Hampshire County. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, 



■ 
Christie, Samuel Edgar Kanawha Salines, Kanawha Oouniy. 

Coleman, Elijah Chalfant Morgantown. 

Cox, James Alfred ArnettsvUle, Monongalia County. 

Darlinton, John William Ii . I fo County. 

Dean, George Albert Wheeling, West Va. 

Deen, John Shreve William Buckhann/on, Upshur County. 

Denison, Lewis Augustas East Libert;/, ]'<>. 

Dix, Daniel Worth Nicholas Oourt-k 

Dolliver, Jonathan Prentiss Granville, Monongalia Count:/. 

Dolliver, Robert " " " 

Duval, Walter Kuhn Wellsburg, Brooke Count)/. 

Etchison, William Peaco FortLaramie, Daootah Territory. 

Everly, Simeon Oliver Morgantown. 

Fast, Morgan Selby Forksburg, Marion Count)/. 

Fischer, Ferdinand Lancsville, Harrison County, Lai. 

Gorrill, Moses Wick, Tyler County. 

Hagans, George Harrison Morgantown. 

Hagans, William Lucian " 

Ilaymond, Frank Thompson " 

Hickman, Charles Frank St. Mary's, Pleasants County. 

Hill, George Bruce Laurel Lron Works, Monongalia Co. 

Hill. William Clay Paris, Washington County, Pa. 

Hillory, William Sanford Wadestown, Monongalia County. 

Holyheld, Clark Paston, 

Hooper, Harry Grafton, Taylor County. 

Howell, William Moses Morgantown. 

Jacobs, Thomas Perry " 

Jackson, Duncan Campbell Brownsville, Pa. 

Jolliff, Joseph Clinton Whileday, Monongalia County. 

Keck, Julius Marcellus Jforgantown. 

Kincaid, William Elza Forksburg, Marion County. 

Kincaid, George Washington Morgantown. 

Kincaid, John Wesley " 

Kitzmiller, George Washington Altamont, Allegheny County, Md. 

Knox, Philander Chase Brownsville, Pa. 

Koontz, Winfield Scott Easton, Monongalia County. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Koontz, Albert Easton, Monongalia County. 

Lazier, Andrew Forraan Morgantown. 

Licklider, Thomas Powell Keameysville, Jefferson County. 

Linen, George Preston Wheeling. 

List, Thomas Eugene " 

Logie, John Harry Keameysville, Harrison County. 

Lynch Charles Wesley Brown's Creek, Harrison County. 

Martin, James Virginius Morgantown. 

Martin, John Errian " 

Martin, Charles Alexander " 

Mattingly, Thomas Conley Parkersburg, Wood County. 

Merrill, Joseph Morgan Eivesville, Marion County. 

Mitchell, William David Hancock; Washington County, Md. 

Moran, Ellsworth Elza Forksburg, Marion County. 

Morgan, Benjamin Stephen Laurel Point, Monongalia County. 

McColloch, Abram Inskipt Clinton, Ohio County. 

McKee, Eobert Jackson Wadestown, Monongalia County. 

McLure, Harry Wheeling. 

McEa, Waitman Clinton Mills, Monongalia County. 

Pogue, Kobert Henry Wheeling. 

Pratt, Edgar Woods " 

Price, Thomas Harner Mooresville, Monongalia County. 

Reed, James Madison Morgantoun. 

Rich, Daniel Laurel Point, Monongalia County. 

Rider, George Win field Morgantoun. 

Robinson, Eustace Leon " 

Rogers, William " 

Roraback, John Zebulon Albion, Orleans County, N. Y. 

Samples, James William ...Clintonville, Greenbrier County. 

Santee, Isaac Benton West Warren, Monongalia County. 

Schaeffer, Gustavus Cresap Kingwood, Preston County, 

Seibert, William Valliant Hainesville, Berkeley County. 

Shriver, Lot Lantz Wadestown, Monongalia County. 

Simmons, David Floyd Weston, Lewis County. 

Sisson, George Edward Valley Grove, Ohio County. 

Smith, Winfield William Bruceton, Preston County. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Spates, Augustus Baer Qariaburg, Harrison County. 

Sterling, Andrew Jackson Masontown, Fayette County, Pa. 

Steuart, Aaron Cromwell North Mountain, Berkeley County. 

Steuart, John William Sycamore Dale, Harrison County. 

Stewart, Caseins Milton Wheeling. 

Stockman, Frederick North Mountain, Berkeley County. 

Strickler, Robert Mann Phillippi, Barbour County. 

Tarr, Hammond, Wellsburg, Brooke County. 

Teter, "William Jay Worth Belington, Barbour County. 

Thrasher, William Marshall Piedmont, Mineral County. 

Wagner, Allen Kramer Morgantown. 

Warman, Clemmer Laurel Iron Works, Monongalia Co. 

Warman, Elza " " 

Williams, Daniel Theodore New Martinsville, Wetzel County. 

Woods, Frank Phillippi, Barbour County. 

Worle y, David Robert Blacksville, Monongalia 

Wright, Palemon Durbannah, " 



10 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Military Department* 



Bvt. Capt. H. H. PIEUCE, U. S. Army, 



com i^lj^j^-jdj^utt . 



STAFF. 

Cadet MABMADUKE H. DENT, Adjutant. 
" C. LINDEN SMITH, Ord. Officer. 
" FEANKLIN A. GOLDEN, Ass't Ord. Officer. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 11 



OFFICERS: Corps of Cadets. 

Cadet JOHN C. ADAMS. Captain. 

JOHN H. DBABELL, First LieuL 
BENJ AM I X W. SMITH, Second LieuL 



Corps of Cadets. 

John C. Adams, 1st District. 

J. S. Shriver Woods, -. " 

Israel C.White, 2d District. 

Ellsworth E. Moran, " 

William T. Bowman, 3d District. 

Mai-cellos L. Temple, " " 

Benjamin W. Smith, 4th District. 

John S. W. Deen, " 

5th District. 

a u 

John H. Drabell, 6th District. 

Marmaduke H.Dent, " M 

Daniel W. Dix, 7th District. 

U (l 

George K. Osgood, 8th District. 

Franklin A. Golden, " 

William M. Howell, 9th District. 

Archibald P. Bader, " 

Charles M. Babb, ..10th District. 

Clarence L. Smith, " 

Daniel W. Border, 11th District. 



OFFICERS : Volunteer Corps. 

THOMAS C. WILSON, Captain. 
WILLIAM E. JOLLIFF, First LieuL 
ALAN E. M'LANE, Second LieuL 



12 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 


Volunteer Labor Corps. 


Sarmiel S. Adams, 


Wa M. Howell, 


Charles M. Babb, 


William L. Ledwith, 


Cincinnatus Berkeley, 


Thomas P. Licklider, 


Daniel W. Border, 


George P. Linch, 


Ami Boyer, 


John H. Logie, 


John B. Brandt, 


George P. Mattingly, 


Robert L. Brown, 


Thomas H. Mattingly, 


William G. Brown, 


Joseph M. Merrill, 


Alexander Butler, 


E. E. Moran, 


George T. Carskadon, 


Taylor B. McClure, 


Jeremiah T. Chadwick, 


H. Franklin McKee, 


Samuel E. Christie, 


Harry McLure, 


Elijah C. Coleman, 


George K. Osgood, 


John W. Darlinton, 


A. F. Rader, 


John & W. Deen, 


Daniel Rich, 


Marmaduke H. Dent, 


John Z. Roraback, 


Daniel W. Dix, 


Benjamin W. Smith, 


T. G. Edmiston, 


C. L. Smith, 


Morgan S. Fast, 


M. L. Temple, 


Ferdinand Fischer, 


Clemmer Warman, 


F. A. Golden, 


Elza Warman, 


N. Bruce Harding, 


Israel White, 


John T. Harris, 


Daniel T. WilHams, 


Lewis Haymond, 


J. S. Shriver Woods, 


George B. Hill, 


Palemon Wright. 


Clark Holyfield, 


51 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 


13 


Normal Class. 




Franklin Arnett, 


Charles W. Lynch, 




Calvin L. Birtcher, 


I'll -worth E. Moran, 




Ami Boyer, 


Benjamin fit Morgan, 




Josephus Brookoyer, 


A-aron L. Purintun, 




"William Brown, 


Daniel Rich, 




Elijah C. Coleman, 


Eustace L. Robinson, 




John 8. W. Dean, 


James W. Samples, 




.Simeon 0. Everly. 


Isaac B. Santee, 




Morgan S. Fast,. 


Marcellus L, Temple, 




George B. Hill, 


Clemmer Warman, 




Clark Holyfield, 


Elza Warman, 




William M. Howell, 


Israel White, 




William E. Kincaid, 


Daniel T. William* 




George W. Kincaid, 




27 


Recapitulation. 




Senior,... . , ,.■ 


. 1 

. 4 
4 


Junior, *, 


Sophomore, 


Freshmen, •« 


34 

. 24 


Normal Class, 27, (less 3 previously enumerated), 


Preparatory Department, ■ 


94 


TOTAL, 




161 



14 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Requisites for Admission, 



I. All candidates for admission to any Department of the University, must 
present satisfactory evidence of good moral character. 

II. Students coming from other Colleges must produce certificates of hon- 
orable dismission from the same. 

III. Those entering as students for a Degree in any Department of the 
University, must sustain an examination in the various studies of the Prepar- 
atory School of the University, or a full equivalent to the same. 

IV. Candidates for Advanced Standing must sustain an examination in the 
previous studies of the Department which they propose to enter. 

V. The regular examination for admission of Candidates, who shall not 
have pursued their preliminary studies in the Preparatory School of the 
University, will take place on Thursday (June 16) succeeding Commence- 
ment, and on Tuesday (Sept. 7) preceding the opening of the Fall term. 

VI. Candidates should procure a copy of the printed Laws of the Univer- 
sity, also the Treasurer's receipt for their tuition fee, before presenting them- 
selves for enrollment 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 15 




The Instruction thus far provided for in the University proper, is princi- 
pally embraced in four Departments or Courses of Study, viz: Classical De- 
partment, Scientific Department, Engineering Department, and Agricultural 
Department. 

CLASSICAL DEPARTMENT. 

This Department, leading to the Degree of Artium Baccalaurcus, embraces 
studies in eight schools as follows: 

1. School of Philosophy. 

Professor in charge — president martin. 
In this School the instruction is given partly by the use of text-books and 
partly by Lectures. The Classical Course includes six terms in this school. 

FIRST YEAR. 

SPRING TERM. — Political Philosophy— Bow-en's Political Economy. 
I'm. i, Tebm. — Mental Philosophy — Haven's. 
"Winter Term. — Moral Philosophy — Wayland's. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Political Philosophy — International Law. — Woolsey. 
WINTER Term. — Sacred Philosophy — Butler's Analogy. 
SPRING Term.— Sacred Philosophy — Natural Theology and Ev. 
Christianity. 

II. School of History and English Literature. 

PROFESSOR LYON. 
Besides Themes, Declamations and Khetorical Headings throughout the 
course, this School embraces six terms, equivalent to two years of instruction 
by text book-. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Universal History — Webber's. 
WINTER Term. — English Literature — Shaw's Manual. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Fall Term. — Rhetoric — Whately's Elements. 
Winter Term. — Logic — Coppee's. 



16 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
Spring Term.— History of Civilization— Guizot's. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
Spring Term. — Literary Criticism — Lord Karnes'. 

III. School of Astronomy and Physics. 

PROFESSOR STEVENS. 

This School furnishes studies in the Classical Course extending through 
two years. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Physics — Silliman's, to Chap. IV, including problems. 

Winter Term. — " Pneumatics, Acoustics, Optics. 

Spring Term.— " Heat, Correlation of Forces, Electricity. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Physics — Analytical Mechanics. 

Winter Term. — Astronomy — Kobinson's, Descriptive and Physical. 

Spring Term. — Practical Astronomy. • 

The various branches of Physics are illustrated by means of suitable ap- 
paratus. In Astronomy the treatment in the text book is supplemented by 
Lectures, whenever it is required in order to represent fairly, the present state 
of Astronomical knowledge. 

IV. School of Mathematics and Engineering. 

PROFESSOR PIERCE. 
The studies in the Classical Department in this School extend through 
two years. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Mathematics — Kobinson's New University Algebra. 
Winter Term. — " Kobinson's Geometry commencing at Book VI. 

Spring Term. — " Kobinson's, Spherical Geometry and Trigo- 

nometry. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Engineering — Mensuration, Surveying, and Navigation. 
Winter Term. — Mathematics — Conic Sections and Analytical Geometry. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Spring Term. — Mathematics — Differential and Integral Calculus. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 17 

V. School of Chemistry and Natural History. 

PROFESSOR STEVENSON. 
FRESHMAN YEAR. 
Spring Term. — Anatomy and Physiology — Draper's. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
I \\ ll Term. — Inorganic Chemistry — Roscoe's. 
"Winter " Organic Chemistry — " 
Spring " Botany — Gray's School and Field Book; 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
"Winter Term. — Zoology — Agaasiz and Gould. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
Fall Term.— Geology — Dana. 

VI. School of the Greek Language and Literaturt . 

PROFESSOR WOOD. 

FRESH M AN YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Herodotus; Arnold's Greek Prose Composition. 
"Winter " Homer's Iliad; Arnold (continued); Greek Grammar. 
Spring " Homer's Odyssey ; Arnold's Prose Comp. (completed). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Xenophon's Memorabilia ; Kvcrciscs in Greek Composition. 
Spring " Plato's Apology and Crito. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
Fall Term. — Euripides' Alcestis. 
Spring " Demosthenes — On the Crown. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
"Winter Term. — Sophocles — Oedipus Tyrannus. 

VII. School of the Latin Language and Literature. 

PROFESSOR WOOD. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Virgil — Bucolics and Georgics; Arnold's Lat. Prose Comp. 
"Winter " Horace — Odes and Epodes; Arnold (continued). 
Spring " Cicero — De Senectute or De Amicitia. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
Winter Term. — Horace — Satires and Epistles; Exercises in Latin Com- 
position. 
Spring " Livy — Lincoln's; Exercises in Latin Composition. 



18 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Winter Teem. — Tacitus — Germania and Agricola; Lat.Com. (continued.) 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Fall Teem. — Cicero — DeOfficiis; Written Exercises on Historical Sub- 
jects. 

VIII. School of Military Science and Tactics. 

PROFESSOR PIERCE. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Fiest Teem. — Infantry Tactics— School of the Soldier. 
Second " Cavalry Tactics — Sabre Drill — Lectures. 

Third " Artillery Tactics — School of the Piece. 

SECOND YEAR. 

FIRST. Teem. — Infantry Tactics — School of the Company. 

Second " Bayonet Exercise; Lectures. 

Third " Target Practice — Small Anns. 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Teem. — Infantry Tactics — School of the Battallion. 

xd " Military Engineering ; Lectures. 

Thied " Target Practice — Heavy and Field Artillery. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Teem. — Infantry Tactics — School of the Brigade. 
Second " Science of Gunnery — Lectures; Martial Laic — Lectures.. 

Thied " Art of War — Lectures. 

Dress Parades, Reviews, Inspections and Guard Mounting, are held as often 
as is deemed expedient, throughout the whole; course. 



SCIENTIFIC DEPARTMENT. 

This Department, leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science, embraces 
studies in seven schools, as follows : 

i". In the School of Philosophy. 
Professor in charge — president martin,. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Fall Teem, — Mental Philosophy — Haven's. 
Winter " Moral Philosophy — Wayland's. 

Spring " Political Economy — Bowen's. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. W 

II. In the School of History and English / terature* 

PROFESSOR I. YON, 

FRESHMAN YEAR, 

Fall Term. — Webber's Universal History. 
WINTER " Shaw's Manual of English Literature. 
Spring u Guizot's History of Civilization. 

NIOB YEAR, 

Fall Thiol — Whately's Elements of Rhetoric 
Winter " Copper's Logic, 

III. School of Astronomy and Physics, 

PROFESSOR STEVENS, 
JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — General Principles of Physics; Gravitation; Theory of Ma- 
chinery; Molecular Forces; Hydrodynamics; Problems. 

Second Term. — Pneumatics; Acoustics; Optics; Problems. 

Third Term. — Heat; Ventilation and Warming; Correlation of Physical 
Forces; Magnetic, .Statical and Dynamical Electricity. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Febst Term. — Analytical Mechanics. 

Second " Astronomy — Descriptive and Physical — Robinson's 
Third u 1st. Practical Astronomy, Calculation and Graphical Con- 
struction of Eclipses; Solution of Problems to be verified 
by the Nautical Almanac. 
2d. Technology — Principles of Science applied to the Fseful 
Arts. 

To pursue successfully the studies of the First Year of this School, students 
must have a fair acquaintance with Algebra, Geometry, and Trigonometry, 
and in addition to these, he should have, before commencing those of the 
second year, some knowledge of Analytical Geometry and Calculus. 

IV. In the School of Mathematics and Engineering. 

PROFESSOR PIERCE. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

First Term. — Robinson's University Algebra, 

■ ND u Robinson's Geometry, beginning at Book VI. 

Third " Spherical Geometry and Trigonometry. 






20 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Robinson's Mensuration, Surveying and Navigation. 
Second " " Analytical Geometry and Conic Sections. 

Third " Differential and Integral Calculus, 

V. School of Chemistry and Natural History. 

PROFESSOR STEVENSON. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Koscoe's Chemistry. (Inorganic), 

Winter " " " (Organic).- 

Spring " Gray's School and Field Book of Botany. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Agricultural Chemistry — Analysis of Soils, Ac- 
Winter " Comparative Physiology and Embryology — Agassiz & Gould. 
Spring " Human Anatomy and Physiology — Draper's. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Lithological, Dynamical and Historical Geology — Dana. 

VI. School of Modem Languages. 

PROFESSOR WOOD. 
FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Fall Term. — German — Woodbury's New Method;- Oral and Written 

Exercises. 
Winter Term. — German — Woodbury's Method, completed; Adler's 

Reader. 
Spring Term. — German — Selected Poetry of Goethe ; Heyse's advanced 

Grammar and his view of German Literature. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term. — French — Fasquelle's French Course; Oral and Written 
Exercises. 

Winter Term. — French — Fa?quelle completed. 

Spring Term. — French — Telemachus or Dumas' Napoleon ; Memoriz- 
ing Sentences and Conversation. 





VII. 


School of Military Science and 

PROFESSOR PIERCE. 


Tactics. 




The studies in 
ment. They are 


this School are the same as those of the Classical 
enumerated on page 18. 


Depart- 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 21 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING. 

The studies in this Department, for the first and second years, are the 6ame 
as in the General Scientific Course. For tli Senior V. ar they arc, in 

School of Philosophy. 

3EDENT MARTIN. 
Fall Term. — Haven's Mental Philosophy. 
Spring " Powen's American Political Economy. 

School of History and English Literature. 

PROFESSOR LYON. 

WnffTEB Term. — Coppee's Logic. 

School of Astronomy and Physics. 

PROFESSOR STEVENS. 

Fall Term. — Peck's Elements of Mechanics; Application of Calculus to 
Mechanics. 

Winter Term. — Robinson's University Astronomy; Lectures. 

Spring Term. — Practical Astronomy — Calculation of the Elements of Eclipses 
from the Solar and Lunar Tables. Graphical Construction 
of Eclipses. Computation of particulars of a general 
Eclipse Trigonometrically, and of a Local Eclipse by the 
application of Analytical Geometry. 

School of Math matics and Engineering. 

PROFESSOR pierce. 
Fall Term. — Civil Engineering — Mahan. 
Winter " Military Engineering — Mahan. 

Spring " Gillespie on the Location, Construction and Improvement of 
Koads and Rail Roads. 

School of Chemistry and Natural History. 

Fall Term. — Geology — Lithological, Historical and Dynamical — Dana ; 
Geological Excursions. 



22 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT. 

In tliis Department, the studies for the first and second years, are the same 
as in the General Scientific Course, excepting that for Modern Languages are 
substituted Lectures on various subjects related to Agriculture; for the Ana- 
lytical Geometry of the second term, Logic, and. for the Calculus in the third 
term, Political Economy. For the Senior Year, they include the following: 

School of Philosophy, 

PRESIDENT MARTIN. 

Fall, Term, — Haven's Mental Philosophy. 

Winter " Wayland's Moral Philosophy. 

Spring " Natural Theology and Evidences of Christianity. 

School of Astronomy and Physics, 

PROFESSOR STEVENS. 

Fale Term. — Principles of Agriculture — Emerson and Flint. 
"Winter " Theoretical Astronomy. 

Spring " Technology — Application of the Principles of Science 
to the Useful Arts. 

School of Mathematics and Engineering. 

PROFESSOR PIERCE. 

Spring Term. — Location and Construction of Roads — Gillespie. 

School of Chemistry and Natural History. 

PROFESSOR STEVENSON.. 

Fall Term. — Dana's Text Book of Geology. 
Winter " Meteorology. 

The subjects for Lectures during the course, are the following r 
FIRST YEAR— FaR Term.— The Chemistry, Structure and Physiology of 
Plants; on the Water, Atmosphere and Soil as related to Vegetables; on 
Tillage, Draining and Manuring. 
Wilder Term. — On Domestic Animals and their Digestion, Respiration, As- 
similation and Excretion; on the Composition, Preparation and Value 
of different kinds of Food ; on Milk, Butter. Cheese, Flesh and Wool as 
Agricultural Products. 
Spring Term.— On Horticultural and Kitchen Gardening; on the Propagation, 
Training and Culture of Fruit Trees, the Vine, Small Fruits and Vege- 
tables. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, 23 

SECOND YEAR— Fall Term.— On the Staple grain, forage, root and fibre 
crops of this and adjoining States, and their varieties and the Boils best 
adapted for them; on the preparation of soil, seeding, cultivating, 

harvesting and preparing for market; on the Origin and Natural His- 
tory of Domestic Animals; on Entomology and the [nsects useful and 
hurtful to vegetation. 

Wii&r Term. — On the raising, care, characteristics and adaptation of diffi 

breeds of Domestic Animals ; On Cattle for beef or draught, and Sheep 
for wool or mutton; on Horses, Swine and Poultry; on Pasturing, Soil- 
ing and Stall Feeding; on Tobacco, Hops, and Forestry. 

Spring Term. — On Bund Economy; on the History of Agriculture, with 
sketches of the Same in Ancient and Modern Times and Foreign Lands; 
on the Adaptation of Fanning to soil, climate, market and other natural 
and economical conditions; on the different systems of Husbandry, such 
as stock, sheep, grain and mixed farming. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Geography — Guyot's Common School; Map Drawing; Arithme- 
tic — Stoddard's Complete; English Grammar — Etymology; Latin — 
Commenced. 

Winter Term. — Geography — Guyot Continued; Map Drawing; Arithmetic — 
Continued; English Grammar — Syntax; Latin — Grammar and 
Reader. 

Spring Term. — Arithmetic — Completed; English Grammar Analysis of 

Sentences; Latin— Grammar and Header; Greek — Bullions' First 
Lessons. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Algebra — Robinson's New Elementary, to Involution ; Book 
Keeping; Csesar — Latin Grammar; Greek Grammar and Reader. 

Winter Term. — Algebra — Elementary completed; History of the United 
States — Wilson's; Cicero's Orations — Bullion's; Latin Grammar; 
Greek Grammar and Reader. 

Spring Term. — Geometry — Robinson's First Five Books; History of the Uni- 
ted States.— Completed ; Virgil — Three Books of -Eneid ; Latin 
Gr a mmar; Xenophon's Anabasis; Greek Grammar. 

Regular Lessons in "Writing, Spelling, Elocution and English Composition 
from the beginning. 



24 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



GENERAL REVIEW OF THE 





Classical Department. 


Scientific Department. 






Universal History. 


Universal History. 


50 


_IS> 

-Joe 


University Algebra. 


University Algebra. 


< UJ 


Herodotus. 


Inorganic Chemistry. 


3 




Virgil. 


Woodbury's German Method. 


dc . Manual of English Literature. 


Manual of English Literature. 


<* 


H^i Geometry — completed. 


Geometrv — completed. 


(5 


E u Homer — Iliad. 


Organic Chemistry. 


£ H | Horace — Odes and Epodes. 


Woodbury's German Method. 


8 


o . Trigonometry. 


Trigonometry. 


£ 


<Ej| Anatomv and Physiology. 


Botany. 


£uj Homer — Odyssev. 


History of Civilization. 




t/,l ~l Cicero — De Senectutc. 


German — Translations. 





. 


Whatelv's Rhetoric. 




cc 


jq: 


Mensuration, Surveying. 






< UJ 


Roscoe's Chemistry — Inorganic. 




B 


DC 


Xenophon's Memorabilia. 






Logic. 




^. 


K 5 


Con. Sect, and Anal. Geometrv. 




© 


^U 


Roscoe's Chemistry — Organic. 






5^ 

CO • 


Horace — Satires and Epistles. 




1 


American Political Economy. 




22 


Gray's Botany. 




^ 


If 25 


Plato — Apology and Crito. 






</>^ 


Livy. 





.1 

J5 


-Ja 


< LLl 


^K 


x 


LJ^ 


^cc 


^UJ 


* H 


■ 


Z5 


p 



Haven's Mental Philosophy. 
Constitution U. S. and West Va. 
Physics — commenced. ' 
Euripides — Alcestis. 



Wayland's Moral Science. 
Pneumatics; Acoustics; Optics. 
Principles of Zoology. 
Tacitus — Ger mania and Agricola. 



Mensuration ; Surveying. 
Physics — commenced. 
Qualitative Analysis. 
Fasquelle's French Course. 



Conic Sect, and Anal. Geometry. 
Pneumatics; Acoustics; Optics. 
Principles of Zoology. 
French — Fasquelle continued. 



Calculus. 

Heat; Electricity. 

i [istory of Civilization. 

Demosthenes — On the Crown. 



Dim and Int. Calculus. 
Heat; Electricity. 
Anatomy and Physiology. 
French — Dumas' Napoleon. 



J2 

-iCC 
< UJ 



^2 



Woolsey's International Law. 
Peck's Mechanics. 
Dana's Text Book of Geology. 
Cicero — De Offieiis. 



C5 • 
zs 



Butler's Analogy. 
Theoretical Astronomy. 
Sophocles — (Ed i pus Ty rami us. 



Nat. Theology & Ev. Christianity. 
Karnes' Elements of Criticism. 
Practical Astronomy. 



Haven's Mental Philosophy. 
Peck's Mechanics. 
Dana's Geology. 
Whatelv's Rhetoric. 



Moral Philosophy. 
Descriptive and Physical Astron- 
omy. 
Logic. 



Political Economy. 
Elements of Criticism. 
Practical Astronomy. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



25 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 



Engineering Department. Agricultural Department. 



Same as in General Scientific De- 
partment 

.Same as in General Scientific De- 
partment. 

Same a* in General Scientific De- 
partment. 



Universal History. 
University Algebra, 
[norganic Chemistry. 

] Lecturer on Plants, Soils, &c. 

Manual of English Literature. 
Plane < reoraetry — completed. 
Inorganic ( Jhemistry. 

tares on Domestic Animal-, &c. 
Spher. Geometry and Trigonometry, 
School and Field Book of Botany. 
History of ( ivili/.ation. 
Lecture- on Horticulture. 



Same as in ( teneral Scientific De- 
partment. 

Same as in General Scientific De- 
partment. 



Mensuration and Surveying. 
Physic? — Theory of Machinery, &c 
AgricuPl Chemistry; Analysis of Soils. 
1 res on Crops and Hurtful Insects. 

Logic, 

Physic* — Pneumatics & Undulations. 
I Comparative Physiology. 
I Lectures on Cattle, Sheep, Horses, &c. 



Same as in General Scientific De- 
partment. 



Political Economy. 
Heat; Electricity; Magnetism. 
Unman Anatomy and Physiology. 
Lectures on Agriculture. 



Mental .Philosophy. 
Analytical Mechanics, 
logy. 

M alum's Civil Engineering. 



Mental Philosophy. 

Manual of Agriculture. 
Geology. 



Spherical and Physical Astronomy. 
Military Engineering — Mahan. 
Logic. 



Meteorology — Climatology, &c. 
Astronomy. 

Moral Philosophy. 



Political Economy. 

Gillespie's Roads and Rail Roads. 

Practical Astronomy. 



Nat'l Theology and Ev. Christianity. 
Location and Construction of Roads. 
Application of Science to the Arts. 



26 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Origin and Scope of the University. 



The subject of advanced Education has been in various forms before the 
people of West Virginia for years, but without any liberal provision having 
been made for the same until quite recently. The Constitution of the State 
makes it the duty of the Legislature to "foster and encourage Moral, Intellectual, 
Scientific, and Agricultural improvement; and to make provision for the organiza- 
tion of sucJ. institutions of learning as the best interests of general education may 
demands The National Congress having donated certain lands "in order to 
promote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the several 
pursuits and professions in life," the Legislature accepted the same, and appoin- 
ted a Board to organize the Institution, with instructions to " establish Depart- 
ments of Education in Literature, Science, Art, Agriculture, and Military Tactics- 
including a Preparatory Department" 

The proceeds of the sale of Congressional lands amounted to 90,000 dollars. 
The citizens of Morgantown contributed in grounds, buildings and money 
about 50,000 dollars. The Legislature, realizing the necessity and immense 
value of such an Institution; its incalculable worth to the youth of the Com- 
monwealth and of the country— scores of whom, in ever increasing numbers, 
have resorted to its Halls— has generously appropriated 16,000 dollars- per 
year for the further endowment and for the current expenses of the University, 
having, pursuant to the formal recommendation of the Governor and in har- 
mony with the design and scope of the Institution, changed its name from 
' : The Agricultural College of V\ T est Virginia," to that of " West Virginia 
University." We trust that in the extent and in the quality of its work, and 
the thoroughness of its discipline and culture, as well as adaptation to the 
demands of the age, it will prove itself deserving of no second rate position 
among the Institutions of our land. It designs by its instruction in Literature 
and Art — in Language, ancient and modem— in Mathematics, pure and applied 
—in the Sciences, physical, mental, moral and social— by its recitations, lec- 
tures, examinations and elevating influences to educate, inform and discipline 
the Student's mind; to strengthen his moral principles, and supply such gen- 
eral and generous as well as special culture as will best prepare him for success 
and usefulness in any pursuit or profession in life. 



* In lieu of the above, the legislature at its last session made a special ap- 
propriation of 22,855 dollars to complete the new Universitv Hall. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 27 



Departments of Instruction. 

There are six of these already in operation. 

1. Preparatory, designed to meet the wants of those who are too yonng, or 
who are not sufficiently advanced to enter the other Departments. 

"2. Literary, in extent and, exactness corresponding to that of our best 
American Colleges. 

3. Scientific, which affords a general preparation for those pursuits that re- 
quire extensive acquaintance with the Sciences. 

-1. Engineering t at present, a branch of the General Scientific Department. 

5. Agricultural, embracing the various branches of Agriculture, Horticul- 
ture, Rural Economy, and the Mechanic Arts. 

6. Military, which is arranged so as not only not to interfere with, but to 
promote instruction and discipline in other Departments. 

Lectureships in Civil and Constitutional Law, and in Physiology, Hygiene 
and related subjects, have also been established. 

An Optional Course is allowed those Students whose special tastes or neces- 
sitiee prevent them from graduating in any of the regular Departments. 

A Normal Class, for the special advantage of Teachers, is formed every 
Spring. In this the ordinary school studies are carefully reviewed, exactness 
and readiness in explanation and definition acquired, and instruction in the 
approved methods of organizing and conducting schools imparted. 
There is also a weekly Lecture before the class on some subject connected 
with teaching. The following, among other subjects, have been discussed 
daring the present year: History of Teaching, by President Martin. Theory 
and Practice of Teaching, by Prof. Lyon. The Teacher's Work under the 
Free School Law of West Virginia, by Prof. Stevens. The Moral Principle I 
in Teaching, by Prof. Pierce. Hygiene of the School Room, by Prof. Ste- ; 
venson. Superiority of American to European Methods of Instruction, by i 
Prof. Wood. The Trustees of the "Peabody Educational Fund," through [ 
their general agent, Dr. Barnas Sears, have placed at the disposal of the j 
University, the sum of five hundred dollars, annually to be given to such young | 
men of the Normal Department as need assistance to quality themselves for 
higher usefulness as Teachers in West Virginia. 

Examinations. 

Three public examinations, at which all the Students are required to be 
prew nt. are held during the year, — one at the close of each Term. These 
may be conducted by written papers or by oral questions. Reports of the 
Deportment and Scholarship of the Students are sent to the parents or guar- 
dian after each examination. 



28 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Calendar. 

The Annual Session of 39 weeks is divided into three Terms of 13 weeks 
each. An interval of a few days occurs between the Fall and Winter, and 
between the Winter and Spring Terms. Also a recess .of about two weeks 
including the Christmas holidays. It is highly important that Students be 
present at the first recitation of their classes. The exercises begin promptly 
on the day designated, and any time lost affects the standing of the Student 
and perhaps embarrasses his whole course. Students entering after the Term 
has opened must take such studies as can be conveniently assigned them. 

!870. June 9, Annual Examination begins. 
" " 12, Baccalaureate Sermon by the President. 

" " 13, Kegents' Prize Contest. 

" " 14, Address before the Societies, by Hon. J. W. Patterson, 

of New Hampshire. 
u u - _ ( Commencement. Dedication of new University Hall. 

' 1 Address by Hon. E. M. Wilson, of Minnesota. 
u 16, Examination of candidates for admission. 
" September 6, Examination of candidates for admission. 
" " 7, Fall Term begins. 

" December 2, " " ends. 
" " 6, Winter Term begins. 

" 22, Christmas recess begins. 

1871. January 4, " u ends. 

■" March 17, Winter Term ends. Brown Prize Contest. 

" Marcli 21, Spring Term begins. 

■" June 15, " " ends. Commencement Day. 



Expe 



nses. 



Preparatory Department,.., $5.00 per Term of 13 weeks. 

Other Departments, 8.00" " ." " 

Students in the Preparatory Department pay one dollar, in the other De- 
partments two dollars per term contingent fee. 

Two Cadets may be appointed by each Eegent, free of charge for tuition, 
books or stationery. Boarding varies from $3.00 to $4.00 per week. 

Volunteer Labor Corps. 

Many of our young men have found it pleasant and healthful to spend an 
hour or two per day, at a remunerative price, in improving and ornamenting 
the grounds, under the direction of the Superintendent. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 29 



Prizes. 

The following prizes have been established by the Regents, viz: 

I. To the Student who shall write the best essay upon a given Bubjei 

To the Student who shall be adjudged the best Declaimer, $15. These prizes 
to be adjudged after public competition, by a committee of citizens appointed 

by the Faculty. 

II. To the Student who shall be adjudged by the Faculty to excel in gen- 
eral deportment, $25. To the second in merit, $15. If preferred, the prizes 
may be given in the shape of medals, time-pieces, or books. 

BROWN PRIZES. 

III. The annual sum of one hundred dollars has been placed in the Presi- 
dent's hands by Gen. <<. W. Brown, of Grafton, for the encouragement of the 
Literary Societies, to be awarded for superiority in Essay, Oration, Declama- 
tion and Discussion. 

PRIZES AWARDED. 

f To D. B. Purinton, for general deportment, $2 

\ To B. W. Smith, " ' " " 15.00 

IUgaU * ] To M. H. Dent, " Essay, 25.00 

[ToW. D. Carlile, " Declamation, 15.00 

f To T. G. Edmiston, for Declamation, 10.00 

j To W. L. Ledwith, " Essay, 20.00 

* 1 To A. E. McLane, " Oration, 30.00. 

I To M. L. Temple, " Debate...... 40.00 

Discipline. 

The Rules of the University require that every student shall be in hi* place 
at all stated exercises from the opening to the close of his connection with the 
University. A record is kept in which are entered the grade of Scholarship 
of each student, his absence from the exercises of the Institution, his tardiness, 
or failure in recitation, unless satisfactorily accounted for. An abstract of this 
record is sent at the close of each Term to parents or guardians so that they 
may see what, and how their sons or wards are studying, and how they stand [ 
in scholarship and deportment. In case of negligence, irregularity, or other 
misconduct, the student will be privately admonished and the parent or guar- 
dian will be informed of the facL Mere inattention to study will, if persisted 
in, insure dismission from the University. No student is allowed to leave the 
town during Term time, without special permission. 

Students from abroad under fifteen years, should have their money sent to, 
and their bills settled by Capt. Pierce, Registrar of the University. 



30 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

Religious Instruction and Worship. 

The exercises of each day are opened with reading the Scriptures and 
prayer, at which ail the students are required to be present. They are also 
required to attend regularly some place of religious worship on the Sabbath, 
and on all occasions to treat the institutions of religion with respect. 

Library. 

A respectable beginning towards a University Library has already been 
made. About fifteen hundred volumes have been carefully selected and 
placed on its shelves, including not only many choice and valuable books of 
reference, but also standard works in the various departments of History, Bi- 
ography, Theology, Agriculture, Art, Science, and General Literature. 

We respectfully request the friends of Education to make contributions to 
its shelves. 

Copies, also, of the Daily Wheeling Intelligencer, and Tri- Weekly Wheeling 
i Register, and of nearly all the weekly journals in the State, as well as several 
\ from other States, have been cheerfully donated to the Reading Room of 
| the University. We trust these are but the beginnings of larger gifts. We 
; earnestly call upon our friends everywhere, and especially upon the citizens 
! of our own State, to aid us in collecting and forwarding to their University, 
J samples of any thing rare and valuable in the animal, mineral or vegetable 
\ kingdom, or any thing serving to illustrate the antiquities, natural or civil 
| history, geology, botany, mineralogy, &c, of the State, or any section of the 
I State or the world. 

Museum. Apparatus, &c. 

The University is in possession of apparatus requisite for thorough illus- 
tration of Chemistry and Physics. 
.The Museum contains numerous specimens in Mineralogy, Geology, and 

• the various departments of Natural History; also a collection in Palaeontol- 

• ogv with characteristic specimens from all the formations. Other collections 
are to be deposited by their owners. We request all who are interested in 

: such subjects to send suitable specimens for the Museum, especially Indian 
' relics, shells, minerals, fossils, and alcoholic specimens of animals. Such do- 
nations will be acknowledged and carefully labeled with the name of the donor. 
The vicinity of the University offers unrivalled advantages for the study 
J of practical Geology. Especial attention will be paid to this branch. 

The laboratory of Practical Chemistry will be in full readiness during 
i 1870-71. The instruction for the present will be devoted chiefly to analysis, 
I with its application to agriculture. 

Donations to the Museum have been received as follows: 
Adams, J. C. French coin, copper. 
Border, D. W. Fluviatile shells from Monongahela river. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 31 



Cox, Mi-- E. •'.. Wheeling. Copy of last issue of Vhchbvrg CU 

Oarrico, Alfred, Morgantown. American coins, copper, 

Darlinton, J. W. ColymbuH toiquatus. 

Dering, Miss II. I., Morgantown. Fluviatile shells. 

Dent, M. H. Fluviatile shells; Stigmaria ficoides. 

Hewitt, ('.. Linton, 0. Indian relics. 

Hanway, W. A.. Morgantown. Agate. 

Houston. James. Crystalline limestone. 

Harding, X. B. Ectopistes migratonus; Bialia Sialis; Colaptes 

auratu*; Sturnella magna. 
Harris, Amos, Morgantown. British half-penny, 177~>. 
Knox, P. C. American coins, copper. 

II. B., M. Dt, Morgantown. Turbo. 
Loar, S. Si, Preston county. Proto-carbonate of Iron. 
Lavton, Mrs. M. V., Morgantown. Copper coin, unknown. 
Layton, L. S . Morgantown. French and American silver coin. Q.Si 
Ledwith, W. L. Fractional currency; Melania from Lake Erie. 
Lorentz, A. VT., Morgantown. Mexican dollar. 
McClure, T. B". Moran,E.E. | Picus villosus; Picus pubescens; Cya? 
Darbin J. Schaffer, G. C. j nurus cristate,-; Parus atracapillus. 
McLane, Alan E. Pipilo erythrophthalmus; Quiscalus versicolor; 

Turdus migratorius. 
Moore, Mrs. E. I, Morgantown. Sea mosses from North Pacific. 

Fitcl '' R \Bucephalaalbeola. 
Wilson, E. W. f 

Saer, .J. W., Morgantown. Specular [ron. 
Scott. D.J. " U. S. Fractional Currency. 

Tolivar, J, Wheeling. Madrepore; Pack of Sequoia gigan tea ; pol- 
ished specimen of wood of Oreodaphne Californica; Cardita. 
Wagner, J.. Wheeling. American dollar and half dollar, 1790 & 1795, 
Webb, C. P., Wayne county. Indian relics. 
Willey, Pev. Chrome iron. 
Willey, Mrs, W. T., Morgantown. Cupule of acorn from Texas. 



Department of Military Science and Tactics. 

The National endowment of the University requires provision to be made 
for instruction in Military Tactics. The Board of Regents has provided the 
facilities for carrying out these obligations. Experience has demonstrated 
the wisdom of the plan. 

The Course of Instruction embraces Infantry, Cavalry and Artillery Tactics; 
the use of the Pa.ymet and Sabre; Ordnance and Gunnery; Military Engi- 
neering. and the Science of War. 

Attendance upon the exercises is made obligatory upon Cadets, and the 



32 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



regular University classes, unless exempted therefrom, by the Faculty, for 
adequate cause. 

A full Uniform has been adopted for the Cadets, to be made after the 
University pattern, harmonizing, as far as may be, the elements of neatness, 
economy and utility. 

The exercises occupy one hour daily, on the afternoons of Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday of each week, at times not to conflict with regular 
recitations. 

Instruction is given in the form of class lectures on the subjects of Science \ 
of Gunnery, Military Engineering and the Art of War. 

Literary Societies. 

There are two of these in connection with the University, furnished with 
suitable Halls, and whose exercises of Composition, Heading, Orations, Debate, 
and Criticism are, in many respects, of great advantage to the Student. They 
also afford facilities for the study of, and acquaintance with, parliamentary 
forms, and the acquisition of business habits. The authorities of the Univer- 
sity will afford every facility for increasing the accommodations and useful- 
ness of these valuable auxiliaries. 

Location. 

Morgantown, the seat of the University, is beautifully located on the right 
bank of the Monongahela river, Monongalia county, West Virginia. The 
scenery around is exceedingly attractive and picturesque. The place has long 
been famous for its social, intellectual and moral culture, and general health- 
fulness. Coaches leave every morning to and from Fairmont, on the Balti- 
more and Ohio Railroad. There is also a daily conveyance between Morgan- 
town and Union town, Pa. Steamboats from Pittsburgh arrive every day at 
Geneva, twelve miles below Morgantown. A place more eligible for the auict 
and successful pursuit of Science and Literature is nowhere to be found. 

The New University Building, 

Xow completed, is a model of architectural beauty and convenient arrange- 
ment, greatly increasing the facilities for carrying out the noble designs for 
which the University was established. 



CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



OF 



West % irgima tJmversity « 



FOR THE YEAR 



lST'OT'l- 




MORGANTOWN : 

F. R. ELMSLIE, BOOK AND JOB PRINTER. 
1871. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



jhoard of Kegei 



:.i. 



No. of Dist. Members of Hoard. P. 0. Address. 

1. T. H. U ><; AN Wheeling. 

2. IIox. F. H. PIERPONT Fairmont 

3. GEORGE M. EAGANS Morgantoivn. 

4. SAMUEL BILLINGSLEY Middlebourne. 

5. IIox. A. I. BOREMAN Parkersburg. 

6. J. LOOMIS GOULD BucJchannon. 

7. W. W. HARPER. Hartford ('if//. 

8. .1 S. W ELK] N SOX ffaro&w. 

9. SAMUEL YOUNG Edray. 

K). JAMES OARSKADON New Creek. 

II. G. M. BELTZHOOVER Shepherdstoum 



Officers of the Bocard. 

T. II. LOGAN, President. 

Col. JAMES EVANS, Treasurer. 

GEORGE 0. STURGISS, Secretary. 



Executive Committee. 

Geo. M. Hagans, Chairman. 

Hon. Jonx A. Dili r. 
E. II. Cooi 

ASHBEL FAIRCHILD, 
< ; EORi E ( '. STURGISS, 

Alexander Martin. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



jfacultu and {jeachcni 



Rev. ALEX. MARTIN, I). D., President, 

And Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 

S. G. STEVENS, A. M., Vice-President, 

And Professor of Astronomy and Physics. 

H. H. PIERCE, A. M., Bvr. Gapc. U. S. A. 

Professor of Mathematics and Militaij Science. 

J. J. STEVENSON, A. M., Ph. D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Natural History. 

F. W. WOOD, A. M., Ph. D., 

Professor of Ancient and Modern Languages. 

J. H. McMECHAN, A. M.,* 

Professor of English Literature,, and Principal in Preparatory Department. 

Rev. J. B. SOLOMON, A. M., 

Acting Professor of English Literature, and Principal of Preparatory 

Department. 

OLIVER MILLER, A. M.,* 

Tutor in the Preparatory Department. 

D. B. PURIXTOX, 

Tutor in the Preparatory Department, 

M. L. TEMPLE, 

Assistant in Preparatory Department. 

J. B. SOLOMON, 

Secretary of Faculty. 

GEORGE M. HAGAXS, Esq., 

Superintendent of Grounds and Buildings. 
*To December 5tk, 1870. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



HFGH W. BROCK, M. ])., 

Lecturer on Pbj 

How. JOHN A. DILLE, 

Lecturer on Civil and Consututioi 

Oapt. II. II. PIERCE, A. M., 

Registrar and Librariau. 

B. W. SMITH. 
Assistant Librarian. 

\ G ..".' >TT, A. B., 

Elocution. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



STUDENTS. 




pa 



NAME. COURSE. 

Dille, Oliver Hagan? Sci.. 

Jolliff. William Elza Lit.. 



RESIDENCE. 

Morgantown. 

. White Day , Monongalia co. 



Junior ffem 



Border. Daniel Webster Lit Shepherds! own, W. Va. 

Drabell, John Herscbell Lit Morgantown, W. Va. 

Dunkin, James Sci Bridgeport, Hanison co. 

Evans, Thomas Ray Sci Morgantown. 

Golden, Franklin Augustus .Sci Brashear City, La. 

Haymoud, Lewis Sci Clarksburg, Harrison co. 

List. Ambrose Shaw Sci Wheeling, W. Va. 

\ McLane, Alan Elza Lit Morgantown. 

Osgood, George Kendall Sci Ceredo, Wayne co. 

Smith, Benjamin Wells Lit Ripley, Tyler co. 

White, Israel Lit Jollytown, Greene co., Pc 

Woods. Jacob Sherman Shriver Sci ; Wheeling, W. Va. 



lopltrnnore mm. 



Babb, Charles Montgomery Lit Locust Grove, Grant co. 

Brown, James Frederick Lit Kanawha Court House. 

Bullock, Edmund Tanner Lit Parhersbvrg. 

Chad wick, Richard Vincent Lit Morgantown. 

McKee, Henry Franklin Opt Brandonville, Preston co. 

Purinton, Daniel Board man Lit Morgantoien. 

Temple, Marcellus Luther Lit Wadestown, Monongalea co. 

Waters, James Talman Lit Kanawha Court House. 

Lit.— Literary Course. Sci —Scientific Course. 
Opt. — Optional Course. 



■1 V ■ -1 1 • 1 n - . . » — ~ .. ■ ■ 

WEST VIRGINIA tTNlVERSIfY 



jU 



men, 



Rougbner, William Le Roy Sci M ■ <-n. 

Garr, Marshall Moore Opt Clarksburg, Harrison co. 

Deen. John Shreve William Lit Buckhai now, Upshur co. 

Harris, John Thomas Sci HarriseiUe, Ritchie co. 

Hoffman, Daniel Clarke Opt Morgantown. 

Howell, William Moses Lit Morgantown. 

Jacobs, Thomas Perry ...Lit Morgantown. 

Licklider, Thomas Fowell Opt Kearney sville, J e 

Logie, John Harry Lit Kearneysvilh, Jefferson co. 

Linch, George Preston Opt Wheeling. 

Lynch, Charles Weslej Lit Brown's Creek, Harrison co. 

Millar, George Washington Lit Morgantoion. 

Moran. Ellsworth Elza Lit Forksburg, Marion co. 

McCleave, Dwight Opt Cumberland, Md. 

McCrum, Page Robert Lit German Settlement, Preston co. 

Parks, Albert Washington Lit Maiden, Kanawha co. 

Price. Thomas Harner Sci.: Maoresville, Monongalia co. 

Prichard, William Taylor Sci Uannington, Marion co. 

Purinton, Aaron Lyon Opt Motgantown. 

Reed, James Madison Lit Boston, Monongalia co. 

Roraback, John Zebulon Opt Albion, Orleans co.. X. )'. 

Ryon. Jesse Trnesdell Opt Washington, D. C. 

Solomon, John Barges Lit Morgantown. 

Woods. Frank Lit Phillippi, Barbonr co. 

Worley, David Robert Opt Blacksvilh ia-eo 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



Jrcparaiorg Jcpijfinc.nt. 



Adams, Samuel Shugart Washington, D. C. 

Allen, Guy Richard Ohampline , Morgantown, W. Va. 

Arnett, William Jerome Arnettsville, Monongalia co. 

Babb, Milton Edmund? Luney's Creek, Grant co. 

Basnett, Ferdinand Samuel Morgantown, W. Va. 

Barker, David H Geneva. Pa. 

Birtcher, Calvin Luther Randall, Monongalia co. 

Borers, -lames S Randall, Monongalia co. 

Brookover, Josephus West Warren, Monongalia co. 

Brown, Robert Ludington Morgantown. 

Brown, William Gay Kingwood, Preston co. 

Butler, Alexander Kearney sville, Jefferson co. 

Bush, Lewis. Jr German Settlement, Prestonco. 

Campbell, Thomas barks Wheeling. 

Carskadon, James Thornton, Beardsville, Mineral co. 

Christie, Samuel Edgar „ Kanawha Salines, Kanawha co. 

.an. Elijah Cbalfant Morgantown. 

. William Henry Arnettsville, W. Va. 

Core, Moses Leren Cass'vUle, u 

Courtney, Alpbens Fisk Randall, Monongalia co. 

Courtney, Daniel Hugh Maidsville, " 

Courtney, Melville Clark Randall, " 

Cox, James Alfred Arnettsville, " 

Crane, John Morriss Kingwood, Preston co. 

Day, John E Wheeling. 

Clarence Brown Morgantown. 

[His, William, Jr Parkersburg . 

DU, Daniel Worth Nicholas Gil. 

! >olliver, Jonathan Prentiss Morgantown 

Polliver, Robert 11 " 

Drabell, Robert " 

hlsUey, Leonard Sherrard, Marshall co. 

Erei i y, Simeon Oliver Morgantown. 

Fischer, Ferdinand Lanesvvle, Ind. 

Fitch, James Plummer... Morgantown. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



Frasher Luke 77/ pecat <■■•. Fayette co.. J 'a. 

Grimes, Joseph Brodera German Settlement, Preeton co. 

Guthrie, John Wort Dunbar, Fayette co., / • 

I lagans. George Harrison fforgantottm. 

Hagans, William Lncien " 

Hall. John Ross Laurel Point, Monongalia eo. 

Hall, Samuel Judson '• " 

Haruer, William Taylor Morgantown. " 

Hartley, Homer '" ,l 

Hartley. Luther Edward " ; ' 

Hartley, Sylvanus Calvin " 

Hart man, Endreas Bouck Clarkeburg. 

Haymond, Prank Thompson Morgantown. 

Haymond, Thomas Clarksburg. 

Hess, Jasper Trarers Laurel Point, Monongalia co. 

Hess, William Balser 

Hill, William Clay Paris. Washington co., Pa. 

Hickman. Charles Frank... St. Mary's, Pleasants co. 

Holyfield. Clarke Easton, Monongalia co. 

Hood. Thomas Milton Arnetlxville, " 

Howell, Fleming- Morgantown. " 

I son, Willey Owens Parkereburg. 

Jackson, Charles William Kingwood, Preston co. 

Jamison, William Calvin Laurel Point, Monongalia co. 

John, Altha Franklin Steicartstoicn, " 

Jones, Barton Morriss Cassville, " 

Keek, Julius Marcellus Morgantown, " 

Kincaid, George Washington " " 

Kincaid, John Wesley " ' " 

Koontz, Albeit Easton, Monongalia co. 

Koontz, Win field Scott " " 

Lazier, Andrew Forman Morgantown. 

Long, Daniel Martin Luther Mt. Morris, Green co., Pa. 

Maliom. Jerome Chapman Newport, Boone co., W. Va. 

Martin. James Virginius Morgantown. 

Martin, John Errian " 

Martin, Charles Alexander " 

Maxwell, Wilson Bonnifield St. George, Tucker co. 

Mills, Charles Elliott Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Mitchell, William David Hancock, Washington co., Md. 

Moore. Charles Andrew Morgantown. 

Morgan, Benjamin Stephen Laurel Point, Monongalia co. 

Morris, Harmon Luther Cassville, " 

McCleave, Johns Cumberland, Md. 

McCulloch, Abraham Inskipt Clinton, Ohio co., W. Va. 

McLure, Harry Wheeling. " 



10 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, 



McLoughlin, Dennis Sutton. Braxton co. 

McWha, Samuel Slippery Rock, Butler co.. Pa. 

Newman, Silas Warwick Easton W. Va. 

0' Cou nor John Morjantoicn. 

Ogden, Jay Franklin Shinnston, Harrison co., W. Va. 

Parshall, Isaac Hamilton McClellandtown, Fayette co., Pa. 

Pell. John Ringcid Burning Springs, Wirt co., W. V 

Peterson. James Jackson Weston, Lewis county. 

Pierpoint, Jeremiah S Middleport, Tyler county. 

Pigott. Thomas G Ilessville, Harrison " 

Protzman, Randolph Boston, Monongalia " 

Purinton, Orlando Board man Independence, Preston county. 

Ramage, Thomas Charles West Milford, Harrison " 

Reed, Ross Enoch Easton. Monongalia u 

Rich. Daniel Laurel Point, " " 

Robbins, William Lindsay Maidsville, " " 

| Rogers, Daniel Morgantown, " " 

j Rogers, William <: " " 

Rude, William Henry " 

Santee, Isaac Benton West Warren, u " 

' Savage, Harrison Glade Farm, Preston " 

Simmons. David Floyd Weston, Leu-is " 

Sinsel. Leroy Swormstedt Prunfytown, Taylor " 

Smith Edgar Randall, Monongalia " 

Snodgrass, Winfield Columbus ...Morgantown, W. Va, 

Staggers, Thomas B \forgantown, I!'. Va. 

Stevens, Joseph Theophilus West tipping, X. II. 

Stewart. John William • Sycamore Dale, Harrison county . 

Stine, George Morris '/ rgantown. 

Todd. James Wheeling. 

Troxell, Asbury Hartinan Martinsburg. 

V r ansi< kle, Charles Glade Farm, Preston county. 

Warden, William Granville, Monongalia co. 

Warden, Reger Alfred " <( 

Warman Elza laurel Iron Works, Monongalia < 

Warman Clemmer " (; " ll 

Warman Lindsey " " :< " 

Waters, Alonzo Alison laurel Point, ,( 

Willetts, John Samuel Wheeling, W. Va. 

Wilson, Edgar Woods Morgantown, Monongalia co. 

Wright, Palernon lJurbannah, il 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. \\ 



Military Department. 



Bvt. Capt. H. H. PIERCE, U. S. Army, 



003VmVL-A.3STID^^3>TT. 



STAFF. 

Cadet DANIEL W. BORDER, Second Lieut, and Adjutant. 
" FRANKLIN A. GOLDEX, First Lieut, and Ord Officer 



Commissioned Officers—Corps of Cadets. 

Cadet JOHN H. DRABELL, Captain. 
" BENJ. W. SMITH; First Lieutenant. 
ii Second " 



12 


WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 




Drum 


Corps. 




J. T. 


Harris, 


J. z. 


Roraback, 


A. F. 


Lazier, 


G. P. 


LlNCH, 


S. S. 


Adams, 


T. H. 


Price, 


Harry McLure, 


A. S. 


List. 




Corps of Cadets 


• 
■ 


district 


NAME. 




PRESENT OR ABSENT. 


I. 


James J. Peterson 




....Present for dutv. 




John S. Willetts 




....Present for duty. 


II. 


Israel C. White 




Present for duty. 




E. E. Moran 




Present for duty. 


III. 


Marcellus L. Temple 




Present for duty. 




Leroy S. Sinsel 




Present for dutv. 


IV. 


Benjamin W. Smith 




....Present for duty. 




John S. W. Deen 




....Present for duty. 


V. 


Willey 0. Ison 




....Present for duty. 




Endress 13. Hartman 




....Present for duty. 


VI. 


John H. Drabell 






Charles W. Lynch 




....Present for duty. 


VII. 


James F. Brown 




....Present for duty. 




Jerome C. Malcom 




....Present for duty. 


VIII. 






....Present for duty. 


Franklin A. Golden 




....Present for duty. 


IX. 
X. 


Wm. If. Howell 




....Present for duty. 


Charles M. Babb 




....Present for duty. 




James J. Carskadon 




....Present for duty. 


XI. 


Daniel W. Border 








Asbury H. Troxell 




....Present for duty. 


Commissioned Officers — University Corps. 




WILLIAM E. JOLLIFF, Captain. 






ALAN E. McLANE, , 


First Lieutenant. 






Second ' ' 




; ' 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



13 



Volunteer Labor Corps. 



E. B. Hartraan, 
W. 0. Ison, 
L. S. Sinsel, 
M. M. Carr, 
H. F. McKee, 
M. E. Babb, 
J. J. Peterson, 
D. B. Purinton, 
J. S. Pierpont, 



W.J. Arnett, 
L. Frasher, 
H. L. Morris, 
J. T. Harris, 
J. T. Waters, 
C. W. Ljnch, 
E. T. Bullock, 
W. W. Parks, 
B, S, Morgaa. 



I 14 


WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 




' 




Formal 


Class. 




Arnett, Wm. Jer 


ome 




Morris, H. L. 




Barker, D. H. 






Morgan, B. S. 




Birtcber, C L. 






McLaughlin, D. 




Brook over, J. 






Pell, J. R. 




Drabell, J. H. 






Pierpoint, J. S. 




Eskey L. 






Pigott, T. G. 




Eveily, S. 0. 






Protzrnan, R. 




Earner, W. T. 






Smith, W. 




Holjfield, U. 






Temple,, M. L. 




Howell,. F. 






Waters, A. A. 




Jones ; B. M. 






War man, C. 




Long, D. M. L. 






War man, E. 




Moran, E. E. 














Recapit 


ulation. 


■ 










....... 2 


Juniors 








12 


Sophomores 








8 



Freshmen 25 

Normal Class, 25, (less 3 previously enumerated), 22 

Preparatory Department 97 

Total 166 



/ 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 15 



Requisites for Admission. 



I. All candidates for admission to any Department of the University, must 
present satisfactory evidence of good moral character. 

II. Students coming from other Colleges must produce certiBcates of honorable 
dismission from the same. 

III. Those entering as students for a Degree in any Department of the Uni- 
versity, must sustain an examination in the various studies of the Preparatory 
School of the University, or their equivalent. 

IV. Candidates for advanced standing must sustain an examination in the 

previous studies of the Department which they desire to enter. 

V. The regular examination for admission of candidates, who have not 
pursued the preliminary studies in the Preparatory- School of the University, 
will take place on Thursday, (June 16th), succeeding Commencement, and on 
Thursday, (September 7th), preceding the opening of the Fall term. 

VI. Candidates should procure a copy of the printed laws of the University, 

also the Treasurer's receipt for tuition, before presenting themselves for 

enrollment. 



16 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Courses of Imstrxicficm* 



The instruction thus far provided for in the University proper, is- principally 
embraced in four departments, or courses of study, viz: Literary Department, 
Engineering Department and Agricultural Department. 

LITERARY DEPARTMENT, 

This Department, leading to the Degree of Artium, Bacealaureus, embraces 
studies in eight schools, as follows *, 



/. 8c7m$ of Philosophy, 
Professor in charge — President Ma.kti;&, 

In this School the instruction is given partly by the use of text books, and 
partly by lectures. The Literary Course includes six terms in this school. 

FIRST YEAR, 

Spring Term. — Political Philosophy— Bow ^ s Political Economy. 
Fail Term, — Mental Philosophy — Havea"s. 
Vinter Term. — Moral Philosophy — Wayland's. 

DOKD YEAH. 

Fall Term.— Political Philosophy — International Law. — WooJsey. 

Winter Term. — Sacred Philosophy — Butlers Analogy. 

Sprikg Term, — Sacred Philosophy — Natwal Theology and Ev. Christianity. 

II, School of Asironmny and Physics, 
Professor Steveks. 

This Schoo*? furbishes studies in the Classical Course extending throngh two 
years. 

JUNIOR YEAK, 

Fall Texm.— Physics — Sifliman's, to Ch^p. IV. including problems. 
Wintbb Term. — " Pneumatics, Acoustics, Optics. 
Spring Term.— Heat, Correlation of Forces, Electricity. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 17 



iXIOR , t BAR. 

Fall Tkijm. — Physic* — Analytical Mechanics. 

Winter T:-:;:v. — .-!-//• womy — Robinson's, Descriptive and Physical. 
• Tebm.— Practical Astronomy. 

The various brandies of Physics arc illustrated by means of suitable appara- 
in Astronomy, the treatment in the text book is supplemented by lectures, 
whenever it is required, in order to represent fairly the present state of astro- 
nomical knowledge. 



III. School of Mathematics and Engineering. 

PROFESSOR PIERCE. 

The studies in the Classical Department in this School extend through three 
years. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 
Fall Term. — Mathematics— 'Robinson's New University Algebra. 
"Winter Term. — " — Robinson's Geometry, commencing at Book VI. 

Spring Term.— ■« —Robinson's Spaerical Geometry and Trigo- 

nometry. 

SOPHOMORE YEAH. 

Fall Term. — Engineering — .Mensuration, Surveying and Navigation. 
Winter Term. — Mathematics — Conic Sections and Analytical Geometry. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Spuing Term.— Mathematics— Differential and Integral Calculus. 

IV. School of Chemistry and Natural History. 

PROFESSOR STEVENSON. 

3HMAN YEA It. 

Spring Term.— Anatomy and Physiology— Draper's. 

SOPHOMORE YEAH. 

Fall Term. — Inorganic Chemistry — Roscoe's. 
Wiktkb Term.— -Organic Chemistry— " 

Spring Term.— Botany— Gray's School and Field Book. 

JUNIOR TEAR. 

Winter Term.— Zoology— Agassiz and Gould. 



18 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



SEHTOB YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Geology— Dana. 

Y. School of the Greek Language and Literature. 

PROFESSOR WOOD. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Herodotus — Arnold's Greek Prose Composition. 

Winter Tkrm.— Homer's Iliad— Arnold (continued) ; Greek Grammar. 

Spring Term. — Homer's Odyssey: Arnold's Prose Comp. (completed.) 

SOPHOMORE YEAH. 

Fall Term. — Xenophon's Memorabilia — Exercises in Greek Composition. 
Spring Term. — Plato's Apology and Crito. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term.— Euripides' Alcestis. 

Spring Term. — Demosthenes— On the Crown. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Winter Term — Sophocles.— Oedipus Tyrannus. 

VI. School of the Latin Language and Literal are. 
PROFESSOR WOOD. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Virgil—Bucolics and Georgics ; Arnold's Latin Prose Comp. 

Winter Term. — Horace— Odes and Epod 

Spring Term. — Cicero — De Senectute or De Amicitia. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Winter Term. — Horace— Satires and Epistles ; Exercises in Latin Comp. 
Spring Term. — Liw — Lincoln's : Exerciser in Latin Composition. 

JUNIOR YEAR, 

Winter Term.— Tacitus— Germania and Agricola; Latin Composition 
continued. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
Fall Term. — Cicero— De Officiis ; Written Exercises on Historical Subjects. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 19 



VII. School qf History and English Literature. 

ACTING PB0FK88OR SOLOMOH. 

Besides Theme?, Declamation? and Rhetorical Readings throughout the course, 
this School embraces six terms, equivalent to two years of instruction l>y text 
books. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Universal History — Webber's. 
Winter Term. — Lout— Coppee's. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Fall Term.— Rhetoric — Wbateley'a Elements. 
Winter Term. — Logic — Coppee's. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
Spring Term.— History of Civilization— Guizot's. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
SrRiNG Term. — Literary Criticism — Lord Karnes'. 

VIII. School qf Military Science and Tactics. 

PROFESSOR PIERCE. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term. — Infantry Tactics — School of the Soldier. 
Second Term. — Cavalry Tactic*— Sabre Drill: Lectures. 
Third Term. — Artillery Tactics — School of the Piece. 

SECOND YEAR. 

FinsT Term. — Infantry Tactics — School of the Company, 
Second Term. — Bayonet Exercise — Lectures. 
Third Term. — Taryel Practice — Small Arras. 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Term.— Infantry Tactics — School of the Battalion. 

ro Term. — Military Engineering — Lectures. 
Third Term. — Target Practice — Heavy and Field Artillery. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Infantry Tactics— School of the Brigade. 

Second Term. — Science of Gunnery — Lectures ; Martial Law — Lectures. 

Third Term. — Art of War — Lectures. 



20 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



_ Vress Parades, Reviews, Inspections and Guard Mounting are held as often a< 

is deemed expedient, throughout the entire course. 



SCIENTIFIC DEPARTMENT. 

This Department, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science, embrace, 
studies in seven schools, as follows : 

/. In the School of Philosophy. 

Professor in Charge— Presi dent Martin. 
SENIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term.— Mental Philosophy— Haven's. 
Winter" Moral Philosophy— Wayland's. 

Spring « Political Economy— Dozen's. 

II. School of Astronomy and Physics, 

Professor Stevens. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term-Geneva Principles of Physics ; Gravitation ; Theory of Ma- 
chinery ; Molecular Forces ; Hydrodynamics; Problems. 
Second " Pneumatics; Acoustics; Optics; Problems. 

Third Pleat; Ventilation and Warming; Correlation of Physical' 

Forces ; Magnetic, Statical and Dynamical Electricity. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term.— Analytical Mechanics. 

Second " Astronomy— Descriptive and Physical— Robinson's. 

Third 1st. Practical Astronomy, Calculation and Graphical Con- 

struction of Eclipses ; Solution of Problems to be verified by 
the Nautical Almanac. 

2d. Technology— Principles of Science applied to the Useful 
Arts. 

To pursue successfully the studies of the First Year of this School, students 
must have a fair acquaintance with Algebra, Geometry and Trigonometry, and 
in addition to these, he should have, before commencing those of the second 
year, some knowledge of Analytical Geometry and Calculus 









WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



21 



III. In the School qf Mat) md Engh 

PB0FE8S0B 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

First Term. — Robinson's University Algebra. 

inson'8 Geometry, beginning at Book VI. 
Third " erica! Geometry and Trigonomel 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

. — Robinson's Mensuration, Surveying and Navi^ 
11 " Analytical Geom'etrj ctions. 

Third " Differential and Integral Calculus. 



IV. School of Chemistry and Natural History. 

PHOFBSSOB STEVENSON. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Roscoe' 8 Chemistry. (Inorganic.) 
Winter " " " (Organic) 

Spring " Gray's School and Field Book of Botany. 

JUNIOR YEAR 
Fall Term. — Agricultural Chemistry — Analysis of Soils, &c. 
Winter Ci Comparative Physiology 'yology — Agassiz and Gould. 

Spring u Human Anatomy and Physiology — Draper's. 

SENIOR YEAR, 
Fall Term. — Lithological. Dyaamical and Historical Geology — Daaa. 



V. School of Modern Languages. 



PROFESSOR WOOD. 

FRESHMAN V ' 
Fall Term. — German — Comfort's Method; Oral and Written Exer 

" — German — " " completed; Adler's Read 

Spring " German — Selected Poetry of Goethe ; Heyse's advanced 

mar, and his view of German Literature. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
Fall T- \eh — Fasquelle's French Course; Oral and Written E\ 

neh — Fasquelle completed. 
Spring 11 French — Telemachus, or Dumas' Napoleon; Memorizin 
tences and Conversation. 



22 


WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 


VI. 


In the ScJwol of History and English Literature. 




ACTING PROFESSOR SOLOMON. 




FRESHMAN^YEAR. 


Fall Term 


— Webber's Universal History. 


Winter <: 


Shaw's Manual of English Literature. 


Spring " 


Guizot's History of Civilization. 




SENIOR YEAR. 



. — Whately's Elements of Rhetoric. 
Winter " Coppee's Logic 

VII. School of 3Iititary Science and Tactics. 

PROFESSOR PIEECE. 

The s : 'lies in this School are the same as those of the Classical Department. 
They are enumerated on page IS. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING. 

The studies in this Department, for the first and second years, are the same as 
e General Scientific Course. For the senior vear thev are. in 



ScJwol of Phylosophy. 



PRESIDENT MARTIN. 



Fall Term. — Haven's Mental Philosophy. 

Bowcn's American Political Economy. 



School of Astronomy and Physics. 

PROFESSOR STEVEN'S. 

—Peck's Elements of Mechanics ; Application of Calculus to Me- 

chai 
ran. — Robinson's University Astronomy ; Lectures. 

Practical Astronomy — Calculation of the Elements of Eclipses 
from the Solar and Lunar Tables. Graphical Construction 
of Eclipses. Computation of particulars of a general Eclipse 
Trigonometrically, and of a Local Eclipse by the application 
of Analytical Geometry. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



PR0FE880B I'll . 

Fall Tina. — Civil Engineering — Mali, in. 
Winter •• Military Engineering — Maban. 
Spring •■ m the Location, Construction and 

Roads and Railroads. 



hemistry and Natu\ ry, 

PROFESSOR STK\ i:.\ JON. 

Fall Term. — Geology — Litbological, Historical and Dynami 
logical Excursions. 



oi of History and Engl 

ACTING PROFESSOR SOL 

Winter Term. — Coppee's Logic. 



ure. 



RICULTURAL DEPARTME 

In this Department, the studies for the first and second years are 
in the General Scientific Course, excepting that for Modern Lai 

stituted Lectures on various subjects related to Agriculture : for 
Geometry of the second term, Logic, and for the Calculus in the third 
Political Economy. For the senior year, they include the follow 



School <f Philosophy, 

PRESIDENT MARTIN. 

Fall Term~ Haven's Mental Philosophy. 
• : W island's Moral Philosophy. 
" Natural Theology and Evidences of ( 



School of Astronomy and I 

PROFESSOR STEVENS. 

Fall Term. — Principles of Agriculture — Emerson and i 

Theoretical Astronomy. 
- s " Technology — Application of the Princij 

ful Art-. 



24 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



Sclwol of Mathematics and Engineering. 

PROFESSOR PIERCE. 

1 ^.-Location and Construction of Roads-Gillespie. 
Scho01 °f Chemistry and Natural History, 

PROFESSOR STEVEXSOX. 

L Fall Term.— Dana's Text Book of Geology. 
Winter ■■ M e | 

The subjects :br Lectures during the course are th e following : 
FIRST YEAR. 
-- Chemistry, Structure and Physiology of Plants: on the Water 
Atmosphere and Soil as related to Vegetables; on Tillage! 
Draining and Manuring. c ' 

r™.-On Domestic Animais and U Digestion, Besoiration. Asrimi- ! 
■ ^Excretion: on the Composition, Preparation and ! 

e o a*™., fcinna of Food . on Bntter ch 

Fi«h and V ooi as Agricultural Product. 
*** ^ "On HorticoUura! and Kitchen Gardening ; on the Propagation 
Teaming and Culture of Fruit Trees., the Vine. Small Fruit's 
and \ egetables. 



SECOND YEAR. 

Fall Term.-On the staple grain. forage, root and fibre crops of this and adjoin- 
ing States and their varieties and the soils best adapted for 
tbem: on the preparation of soil, seeding, cultivating, harvest- 
«ng and preparing for market ; on the Origin and Natural His- 
of Domestic Animals; on Entomology and the Insect. 
fill and hurtful to vegetation 
T, -.-ri„ the rairing, care characteristics and adaptation of different 
breeds* Domesttc Animals : on Cattle for beef or draught, 
and sheep for wool or mutton ; on Horses. Swine and Ponl- 
•i on Paatoring, Soiling and Stall Feeding: on Tobacco 
Hops and Forestrv. ■ 

' ~ 0n ^r EC ™ 0m ^ ° n ** H -ory of Agriculture, with 

_ sketches of the same in anci .nt and modern times and forei, a 

la I en the Adaptation of Farming to soil, climate, market 

and other natural and economical conditions ; ou the different 

systems of Husbandry, such as stock, sneep, grain and mixed ! 



farminar. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 25 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

FIRST VEAR. 
/•/// Term. — Geography — Guyot's Common School: Map Drawing; Arith- 
metic — Stoddar h Grammar— Etymology ; 
Latin — Commenced. 
Winter Term.— "Geography — >Guyot Continued; Map Drawing; Arithmetic— 
Contiuned; English Grammar — Syntax; Latin — Gramma? 
and Reader. 
rm. — Arithmetic — Complete; English Grammar — Analysis of Sen- 
tences: Latin — Grammar and Reader: Greek — Bullions' 
First Lessons. 

SECOND VKAR. 

Fall Term. — Algebra — Robinson's New Elementary, to Involution; Book 
Keeping; Caesar — Latin Grammar; Greek Grammar and 
ider. 
Winter Term. — Algebra — Elementary completed : History of the United 
States— Wilson's ; Cicero's Orations — Bullion's: Latin Gram- 
mar: Greek Grammar and Reader. 
Spring Term. — Geometry — Robinson's First Five Books; History of the United 
States — Completed ; Virgil — Three Books of JEneid ; Latin 
Grammar; Xenophon's Anabasis; Greek Grammar. 
Regular lessons in Writing. Spelling, Elocution and English Composition 
from the beginning. 



Ju . » ,.. r ... » . 



26 



W E S T V I R G I N I A U NfV E RSI T Y 



&en£ral Hcuicu; at the 



Literary Department. 



Scientific Department, 



Universal History. 
University Algebra. 
Herodotus. 
Virgil. 



Universal Hietory. 
University Algebra. 
I n o rga nic C h em i s try . 
Woodbury's German Method. 



Manual of English Literature. 
Geometry — completed. 
Homer — Iliad. 
Horace — tides and Epodes. 



Manual of English Literature. 
Geometry — completed. 
< Irganic Chemistry. 
Woodburv's German Method. 



Ph i 2 



t*s r— 



Trigonometry. 
Anatomy and Physiology 
Homer — Odyssey. 
Cicero — Pe Senectute. 



Trigonometry. 
Botany . 

History of Civilization. 
German — Translations. 



I £ 
O 



Whately's Rhetoric. 
Mensuration, Surveying. 
Roscoe's Chemistry — Inorganic. 
Xenophon's Memorabilia. 



ID 



o : ^ 

O : 

^ \ 

O j cs 



Logic 

Con. Sect, and Anal. Geometry 
Roscoe's Chemistry — Organic. 
Horace — Satires and Epistles. 



American Political Economy 

Gray's Botany. 

Plato — Apology and Crito. 

Livv. 



=|S 



Haven's Mental Philosophy. 
Constitution U. S. and West Va 
Physics — commenced. 
Euripides — Alcestis. 



Mensuration ; Surveying. 
Physics — commenced. 
Qualitative Analysis. 
Fasquelle's French Course. 



O 



.2 ;S+= 



PI 
Ha 



Wayland's Moral Science. 
Pneumatics; Acoustics; Optics. 
Principles of Zoology. 
Tacitus — Germania and Agricr-lu. 



Conic Sect, and Anal Geometry. 
Pneumatics; Acoustics; Optics. 
Principles of Zoology. 
French — Fasquelle continued. 



Calculus. 
Heat ; Electricity. 
History of Civilization. 
Demosthenes — On the Crown. 



Diff. and Integral Calculus. 
Heat : Electricity. 
Anatomy and Physiology. 

French — Dumas' Napoleon . 






O j £ 



. | Woolsey's International Law. 
-j p ; Peck's Mechanics. 
2 £ | Dana's Text Book of Geology. 
Cicero — De Officiis. 

Butler's Analogy. 
Theoretical Analogy. 
Sophocles — CEdipus Tyrannus. 



Haven's Mental Philosophy. 
Peck's Mechanics. 
Dana's Geology. 
Whately's Rhetoric. 

Moral Philosophy. 
Descriptive and Physical Astron- 
omy. 
Logic. 



Nat. Theology and Ev. Christian- 
ity- 
Karnes' Elements of Criticism. 
Practical Astronomy. 



Political Economy. 
Elements of Criticism. 
Practical Astronomy. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 27 


Eourses of Instruction. 


Engineering Department Agricultural Department. 


Sainc as in General Scientific Depart- 
ment. 


Universal Bistory. 
University A Igebra. 
Inorganic ( Jhemistry. 
Lectures on Plants, Soils. &c. 


Same as in General Scientific Depart- 
ment. 


Manual of English Literature. 
Plane Geometry — completed. 
Inorganic Chemistry. 

Lectures on Domestic A ninials. . 


Same as in General Scientific Depart- 
ment. 


Spher. Geometrj and Trigonometry. 
School and Field Book of Botany. 
History of Civilization. 
Lectures on Horticulture. 














Same as in General Scientific Depart- 
ment. 


Mensuration and Surveying. 
Physics — Theory of Machinery. &c. 
AgricuP I Chemistry; Analysis of Soils. 
Lectures on Crops and Hurtful Insects. 

Logic. 

Physics — Pneumatics k Undulation. 
Comparative Physiology. 
Lectures on Cattle. Sheep. Dors* - 


Same as in General Scientific Depart- 
ment. 


Same as in General Scientific Depart- 
ment. 




Political Economy. 

Heat: Electricity; Magnetism. 

Human Anatomy and Physiology. 

Lectures on Agriculture. 

. .. . _!: — — 


Mental Philosophy. 

Analytical Mechanics. 
Dana's ( reology. 

Mahan's Civil Kngim 


Mental Philosophy. 
Manual of Agriculture. 
Geoli - 


Spherical and Physical Astronomy. 
Military Engineering — Maban. 
Log 


Meteorology— Climatology, &c. 
Astronomy. 

Moral Philosophy. 


Political Economy. 

Gillespie's Roads and Railroads. 

Practical Astronomy. 


Natl Theology and Bv. Christianity. 
Location and Construction of Roads. 
Application of Science to the Arts. 



23 



\V E S T V I R G 1 N I A U XIV E R S I T Y 



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WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



29 



I) 



H 



\l\U\X AND V'OiT: OF Till 



■k 



[VERSIT1 



The subject of advanced education has been in various form? before the peo- 
ple of West Virginia for year?, but without anv liberal provision having been 
for the same until quite recently. The Constitution of the State make- it 
the dutv of the Legislature to "Jotter and encourage Morale Intellectual 
and Agricultural improvement : and to make provision for the organization oj 

• ttions of learning as the beet interest* of general education may demand." The 
National Congress havin donated certain lands ''in order to promote the liberal 
and practical education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and t 

in life" the Legislature accepted the same, and appointed a Board to or- 

:e the Institution, with instructions to "establish Departments of Education 
in Literature, Science, Art, Agriculture, and Military Tactics — including a Pre 
paratory Departmt 

The proceeds of the sale of Congressional lands amounted to $§0,000. The 
citizens of Morgantown contributed in grounds, buildings and money, about 

000. The Legislature, realizing the necessity and immense value of such 
an Institution; its incalculable worth to the youth of the Commonwealth and 
of the country — scores of whom, in ever increasing numbers, have resorted to its 
balls — has generously appropriated $10,000 per annum toward the permanent 
endowment besides an amount to meet the annual deficit, having, pursuant to 
the formal recommendation of the Governor and in harmony with thedesign 
and scope of the Institution, changed its name from -'The Agricultural College 
of West Virginia," to thatof "West Virginia University." We trust that in 
the extent and in the quality of its work, and the thoroughness of its dis- 
cipline and culture, as well as adaptation to the demands of the age. it will 
prove itself deserving of no second rate position among the Institutions of our 
land. It designs by its instruction in Literature and Art — in Language, an- 
cient and modern — in Mathematics, pure and applied — in the Sciences, physical, 
mental, moral and social — by its recitations, lectures, examinations and eleva- 
ting influences to educate, inform and discipline the student's mind : to 

igthen his moral principles, and supply such general and generous as well 
•ial culture as will best prepare him for success and usefulness in any pur- 

ir profession of life. 



or 



30 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION. 

Tberere are six of these already in operation. 

1. Preparatory; designed to meet the wants of those who are too voting 
who are not sufficiently advanced to enter the other Departments. 

2. Literal y. in extent and exactness corresponding to that of our best Ameri- 
can Colleges. 

3. Scientific, which affords a general preparation for those pursuits that re- 
quire extensive acquaintance with the Sciences. 

4. Engineering, at present, a branch of General Scientific Department. 

• 5. Agricultural, embracing the various branches of Agriculture, Horticulture. 
Rural Economy, and the Mechanic Arts. 

6. Military, which is arranged so as not only not to interfere with, but to 
promote instruction and discipline in other Departments. 

Lectureships in Civil and Constitutional Law, and in Philosophy, Hygiene 
and related su-bjocts, have also been established. 

An Optional Course is allowed those students whose special tastes or necessi- 
ties prevent rh"m from graduating in any of the regular Departments. 

A Normal Class, for the special ad vantage of Teachers, is formed every spring. 
In this the ordinary school studies are carefully reviewed, exactness and readi- 
ness in explanation and definition acquired, and instruction in the most ap- 
proved methods of organizing and conducting schools imparted. There is also 
a weekly Lecture before the class on some subject connected with teaching. 

The Trustees of the "Peabody Educational Fund," thiough their general 
agent. Dr. Barnaa Sears, have placed at the disposal of the University, the sum 
of five hundred dollars, annually to be given to such young men of the Normal 
Department as neea assistance to qualify themselves for higher usefulness as 
teachers in West Virginia. 
• 

EXAMINATIONS. 

ree public examinations, at which all the students are required to be pres- 
ent, are held during the year. — one at the close of each term These may be 
conducted by written papers or by oral questions. Reports of the deportment 
nnd scholarship of the students are sent to the parents or guardian after each 
examination 

CALENDAR. 

The annual session of 39 weeks is divided into three terms of 13 weeks each. 
An interval of a few days occurs between the Fall and Winter, and between the 
Winter and Spring terms. Also a recess of about two weeks including the 



WEST VIRGINIA DNIVERSrTY. 31 



Christmas holidays. It is highly important that students il ihe first 

recitation of thi The exercises begin Promptly <m the day d 

and any time lost affects the standing of the student, and perhaps embari 
his who 

inual Commencement Exercises arc laid on the third Wednesday o| 
June. r i he Fall Term begins on the Srat Wednesday of September. 

1871. June 8, Annual Examination begins. 

9, Monongal inn Society Anniversary. 
" 11, Baccalaureate Sermon. 
•• \-i. Regents' Priae Contest. 
•• 13, Address before the Literary Societies, by ftev. .). P. 

Newman. D. D., Chaplain of the United State.- Senate. 
'■ 15, Commencement Exercis 
" 16, Examination of candidates for admission. 
Septembers, Examination of candidates for admission. 
6, Fall Term begins. 
'• December I, '• " ends. 

5, Winter Term begins. 
21, Christmas recess begins. 

1872. January 3, •' ends. 

March 16, Winter Term ends. Brown Prize Contest. 
14 20, Spring Term begins, 

June 20, " " ends. Commencement Day. 

EXPENSES. 

Preparatory Department $5.00 per Term of 13 weeks. 

Otner Departments 8.00 " " 

Students in the Preparatory Department pay one dollar; in the other De- 
partments two dollars per term contingent fee. 

Two Cadets may be appointed by each Regent, free of charge for tuition. 
- or stationary. Boarding varies from $3.00 toS-i.OO per week. 

VOLUNTEER LABOR CORPS. 

Many of our young men have found it pleasant and healthful to spend an hour 
or two per day, at a remunerative price, in improving and ornamenting the 

grounds, under the direction of the Stipe, intendent. 

REGENTS' PRIZES 

I. To the Students who shall write the best essay upon a given subject, 
To the Student who shall be adjudged the best Declaimer, $15. These pi'is 

be awarded after public competition, by a committee of citizens appointed by the 
Faculty. 



32 



WEST VIRGINIA UXIVERSIT 



BROWN PHIZES, 

II. The annual sum of one hundred dollars has been placed in the President's 
bands i by Gen. G. W .Brown, of Grafton, lor the encoJageme.t ot thet ffi 
Socmres, to be awarded for superiority in Essay. Oration, Declamation and 



PRIZES AWARDED. 

1869. 

\ S' 2; Puril V on - for general deportment, ....... $95 00 

1 B rt . Smith, " " <; ' <*.-•>. uu 

' ! M.H. Dent, '« Essay V- 

1 w. d. Gariiie, - Dw»^Si\":^::::::;:;:;; ilZ 

1870. 

f T. G Edmiston, for Declamation q 10 nn 

! W. L. Led with, "Essay on «« 

"1 A. E. McLane, »« Oration."..'.*'.." ' 

lm. l. Temple, « Debate,. I;:::::.;.;:":;;;;; ISiSS 

187*0. 

f B. W Smith, for depor t men t q.,= nfl 

R. M. Strickler, " « * S-a.Ou 

"I A- E. McLane and W L. H*«Ck^~ «.~ 50© 
[A.F. Lazier, for Declamation, ...... " 15*00 

IS 1 ?!. 
f J. S. Willetts, for Declamation q ln nn 

! D. W. Border, " Essay ^l ' 00 

i j. c.whhe, « oration;::::::;:::; Ho 

ld.b. -urmton, <• Debate,: .;::;:;;:;::;;;;; Tool 



Regents 



Brown 



Regents' 



Brown. 



DISCIPLINE. 

The rules of the Imrersity squire that c , ve ,. v g, ndent „ ,, e in 
all stated exercu*. from the opening ,„ the close of his connection with the 

eaTs?„7„\ tT' diSl ; ep,in Whk ' h a, ' e eme '' ed the « ra(!e »f Soholarshi. of 
each Student htsabsence from the exercise, of the institution, his tardiness! or 
fatlure ,n rec.tation, unless satisfactorily accounted for. An abstract of this 
record tssent at the close of each Term to parents or guardians, so that thev may 
see what, and how thetr wards are studying, and how they stand in scholarship 
and deportment. In ease of negligenee. irregularity, or other misconduct, the 
.indent w,ll be pr.vately admonished and the parent or guardian will be in- , 
formed of the ,e. Mere inattention to study will, if persisted in, insure di - 
BM.OD trom the tn.verstty. No Student is allowed to leave the town during 
term time without special permission. P 

Students from abroad, under fifteen years, should have their money sent to 
and their bills settled, by Capt. Pierce, Registrar of the University. " 



WEST VIRGINIA DNiVERSITY. 33 



RELIGIOUS rNSTRUOTION AND WORSHIP. 

The exercises of each day are opened with reading the Scriptures and pr 

at which all the Students are required to be present. They are also required to 
attend regularly some place of religious worship on the .Sabbath, and on all occa- 
sions to treat the institutions of religion with respect. 

LIBRARY. 

A respectable beginning towards a University Library has already been made 
About fifteen hundred volumes have been carefully selected and placed on its 
shelves, including not only many choice and valuable books of reference, but 
also standard works in the various departments of History, Biography, The- 
ology, Agriculture, Art, Science and General Literature. 

We respectfully request the friends of Education to make contributions to its 
shelves. 

Copies, also, of the Daily Wheeling Intelligencer and Tri- Weekly Wheeling 
Register, and of nearly all the weekly journals in the State, as well as several 
from other States, have been cheerfully donated to the Reading Room of the 
University. We trust these are but the beginnings of larger gifts. 

MUSEUM, APPARATUS, &c. 

The University is in possession of apparatus requisite for thorough illustration 
of Chemistry and Physics. 

The Museum contains extensive Mineralogical, Geological and Conchological 
cabinets, together with many specimens in other departments of Natural History. 
We request all who are interested in such matters to send suitable specimens for 
the Museum, especially Indian relics, shells, minerals, fossils, and alcoholic 
specimens of animals. Such donations will be acknowledged and carefully 
labeled with the name of the donor. 

The vicinity of the University offer3 unrivalled advantages for the study of 
practical Geology. Especial attention will be paid to this branch. 

The laboratory of Practical Chemistry is in operation. The instruction for 
the present is devoted chiefly to analysis, with its application to agriculture. 
Donations to the Museum have been received during the year as follows : 
Border, D. W., Frederick City, Md. Snakes. 
Beekmau, Duryee, Schoharie, N. Y. Revolutionary Coin. 
Dent, M. H., Pruntytown, W. Va. Fresh Water Shells. 
Dille, J. A., Morgantown, W. Va. Canadian Coin. 
Gebbard, Jno. Jr., Schoharie, N. Y. Limestone with Glacial Striae. 



34 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

Huffman, N. N.. Morgantown, W. Va. Journal of Chinese Colporteur. 
Hindman, W. L., Shinnston, W. Va. Silicified Wood. 
Hough, L. S., Morgantown, W. Va. Gold Ore from California. 
Harris, J. T., Harrisviile, W. Va. Fossils from Miocene Marls, Va. 
Jackson, M., Morgantown. W. Va. Nests and Eggs of various birds. 
Lincb, G. P. ; Wheeling, W. Va. Concretions. 
Lyon. F. S., Mich. Chinese Coins and Curiosities. 
McCrum, W. Va. Galena and Flint arrow-head. 
Mills, Pittsburgh, Pa. Petroleum Waste. 
Osgood. G. R., W. Va. Indian Relics. 

Parks, Mrs. Dr., Maiden. W. Va. Marine Shells from California. 
Protzman, W. J , Morgantown, W. Va. Coin. 
Stine, D. H., Morgantown, W. Va. Coins. 
The University is especially indebted to the Smithsonian Institution for several 
collections of marine shells. 

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

The National endowment of the University requires provision to be made for 
instruction in Military Tactics. The Board of Regents has provided the facilities 
for carrying out these obligations. Experience has demonstrated the wisdom of 
the plan. 

The Course of Instruction embraces Infantry, Cavalry and Artillery Tactics ; 
the use of the Bayonet and Sabre ; Ordnance and Gunnery ; Military Engineer- 
ing, and the Science of War. 

Attendance upon the exercises is made obligatory upon cadets, and the regular 
University classes, unless exempted therefrom, by the Faculty, for adequate 
cause. 

A full uniform has been adopted for the cadets, to be made after the Univer. 
sity pattern, harmonizing as far as may be, the elements of neatness, economy 
and utility. 

The exercises occupy one hour daily, on the afternoon of Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday of each week, at times not to conflict with regular 
recitations. 

Instruction is given in the form of class lectures on the subject of Science of 
Gunnery, Military Engineering and the Art of War. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are two of these in connection with the University, furnished with 
suitable halls, and whose exercises in Composition, Reading, Oraiions, Debate 
and Criticism are, in many respects, of great advantage to the student. They 
also afford facilities for the study of, and acquaintance with, Parliamentary forms, 
and the acquisition of business habits. The Authorities of the University will 
afford every facility for increasing the accommodations and usefulness of these 
valuable auxiliaries. 



\V E S T VI R G I N I A U N i V E RS I T Y 



o,- 



LOCATION. 

Morgantown, the seat of the University, is beautifully located on the right 
bank of the Monongabela river. Monongalia county, West Virginia. The 
scenery around is exceedingly attractive and picturesque: The place lias long 
been famous for its social, intellectual and moral culture, and general heal thf ni- 
ches leave every morning to and from Fairmont, on the Baltimore 
and Ohio Railroad. There is also a daily conveyance between Morgantown and 
Uniontown, Pa. Steamboats from Pittsburgh arrive e^ery day at Geneva, 
twelve miles below Morgantown, and at Morgantown twice each week. A place 
more eligible for the quiet and successful pursuit of Science and Literature is 
nowhere to be found. 

THE NEW UNIVERSITY BUILDING, 

Now completed, is a model of architectural beauty and convenient arrangement, 
greatly increasing the facilities for carrying out the noble designs for which the 
University was established. 



Erratum. — Tnsert the name of John Wesley Hickman, Middlebourne, Tyler 
county, \V. Va., in the list of the Preparatory Department: add 4 to the Re- 
capitulation, making total number of Students 170. 






~'ty 



CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



OF 






FOR THE YEAR 



1871-72. 




MOBGANTOWN: 

KORG \X A EOFFMAN, PE1 I 

1872. 



-k 




WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 






■w 



jtoarb of Jicgcnts. 



No. of District. Name of Regent. P. O. Address. 

1 - - - T. H. LOGAN, President, - - - - Wheeling. 

2 - - - Hon. F. H. PEIRPOINT, Fairmont. 

GEORGE M. HAGANS, Morgantovm. 



o 



4 - - - SAMUEL BILLINGSLEY, - - - - Middlebourne. 



5 - - - D. II. LEONARD, Elizabeth. 

G - - - J. LOOMIS GOULD, Buckhannon. 

7 . . . W. W. HARPER, Point Pleasant. 

8 --- J. S. WILKINSON, Hamlin. 

9 - - - ALEX. F. MATHEWS, Lewisburg. 

10 - - - JAMES CARSKADON, New Creek. 

1 1 - - - G. M. BELTZIIOOVER, ----- Shepherd&tvwn. 






Officers of the Board. 

T. II. LOGAN, President, 
ADAMS W. LORENTZ, Treasurer. 
GEORGE C. STURGISS, Secretary. 



Executive Committee. 



GEORGE M. HAGANS, Chairman. 

Hon. JOHN A. DILLE. 
E. H. COOMBS. 
ASJIBEL FAIRCHJLP. 
GEORGE C. STURGISS. 
ALEXANDER MARTIN. 



2 ( J 

jXlI'llKlClll'liniKHII. l'l.H,"iinil<U'l, l>li'Wl,'M-|,'l„M,"wM,"K'l| »«««•. "V 1 -^- — ■ ■ '.-«?>:' 



— 

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



fo r ffg mi Iwlffl 




Rev. ALEX, MARTIN, D. D., President, ■ 

And Pi -i -• . i ■ Ifeatal and M.>r:il Seieaee 

S. G. STEVENS, A. M., Vice-President, 

'ii Professei el latreaonsy aad Ph 

II. II. PIERCE, Bvt. Capt. W S. A., 

Professor of Mathen atlas and MllRarj Science. 

J. J. STEVENSON, A. M., Ph. D., 

Profeseor of Chemistry aad Nainr.il History. 

F. W, WOOD, A, M., Ph. D., 

Professor of Modern languages and Literature. 

Rev. J. B. SOLOMON, A. M., 

Profe s sor »f English Literature, and Principal of Preparatory Drpartmcnt 

Rev, JOHN W. SCOTT, D. D., LL. D., 

Acting Professor of Ancient Language and Literature. 

GEOKOK X. GLOVER, A. M., 

Acting Professor cf History, Political Kconomy, and Helles Lettres. 

J. a SOLOMOX, 

y of Faculty. 

GEORGE M. HAGANS, Esq., 

Superintendent of Ground*, and BaUdiagl 

HUGH W. BROCK, M. D., 

Lecturer on Physiology and RygieM 

Hon. JOHN A. DILLE, 

Lectumr on Civil and Constitational Law 



Capt, H. H. PIERCE, u 



bra nan. 



A. G, ALCOTT, A. 13., Teacher of. 



lecuti 






&^&>' 






iCl^-iCli" 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



indents 



,.•.,.■.,«.»,.,„. 



Seniors 



Drabble, John Heesoheli ......Lit.... 

M'Lane. Alax Elza .Lit... 

Smith. Benjamin Wells... .Lit.... 

White, Israel. C... ,,,.. ..Lit,.. 



Morgantown, Monongalia Co. 



Ripley, Tyler Co. 

.....JoUytov:n, Greene Co., Pa, 



{ Babe, Charles MoNTGOMERY.........Lit.........£oCTM< Grove, Grant County, 

{ Boughnee, Wh.i.iam LbRoy Sci Morgantown. 

I Brown, James Frederick Lit, .Charleston, Kanawha County. 

) Bueecm'K. Edmund Tanner .Lit .Parkersburg, Wood County. 

s Chadwick, Richard Vincent .Lit.... Morgantovcn. 

I Harris, John Thomas..... Sci.........i/amswi//e, Pitchic County, 

i Hoffman, Daniel Clark ,. ...Opt Morgantoum. 

) Linch, George Preston*,.. ,Sci ....Wheeling, Ohio County, 

^ McClure, Taylor Ba^om Sci Louisa, Lawrence Co., Ku. 

\ Price, Thomas Horner Sci Mooresville, Monongalia Co. 

I Prichard, William Taylor....,..., Sci Mannington, Marion Co. 

) Plrinton, Daniel Boardman..., LAi....... ..Morgantown. 

] Temple, Marcellus Luther... Lit Wadestown, Monongalia Co. 

\ Waters, James Talman., ..Lit... A T eni York City. 



Lit.— Literary Course. SeL— Scientific Gourae. Opt.— Optional Course. * Conditioned. 



i 



■ •>.<>. .'../■......•,, • 



»». .,,»,,■,.•. .>«..»«.'•. ,.••. 1. 1, 'I, .•!,•<, I', .••.,■! !,">, .M,". . ■•' 

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. ,'• 

I I 

Sophomores. 

Dean, John Shreve W t illiam Lit Buckhannon, D inty. 

Howell, William Moses Lit ton. 

Jacobs, Thomas Perry Lit " 

Logie, John H Lit A' I >unty. 

I ymii. < ha rles Wesley Lit Brown's ( r'o. 

Mel bum, Page Robert Lit German Settlement, I 

Millar, I ; eorg e \V lshington Lit Seio, Ohio. 

Moran, Ellsworth Blza* Opt Forksburg, Marion County. 

Solomon, John Surges* Lit Morgant ■ 

3, Frank Lit Phillippi, Barbour County. 

treshwen; 

Adams, Samuel Shugert Lit Washington ('it;/, 1). C. 

Allen, Guy Richard Champline.... Lit Morganlown. 

A.RGABRIT1 e Taylor Opt Pal nty. 

A rnett, William Jerome* Lit Arnettsville, Munongali 

Botkin, William Chapman Opt Charleston, Kanawha County. 

Brown, Robert Ludington Opt Morgant n 

Carse adon, James Thronton Opt Headsville, Mineral Count!/. 

Day, John E Opt Wheeling, Ohio County. 

Doliver, Robert IT Lit Mofganlown. 

Doliver, Jonathan Prentiss Lit " 

Willey Owens Opt Purkersburg, Wood County. 

Lazier, Andrew Foreman* Sci Morgc t von. 

Martin, .1 lmee Virginius Lit Morgantown. 

M \- »N, .1 \mi:s II. ■ Lit White Day, Monongalia Co. 

McCleave, Johns Lit Cumberland, Md. 

Mel rum, 1. 1. "VD Sci Oert ' 

LLOl i.'. ABRAM InSKIPT Lit Clinton, Ohio County. 

Petersos ■' kson Lit I ! Oounty. 

PlGOTT Thi den Opt HessviUe, Harrison ("aunty. 

Ramage, Thom •.- < i! lrles Oj>t West Milfonl, Harrison County. 

■:. J esse Truesdel: Opt ( 'harleston, Kanawha Comity. 

Warman, Clemmer* Opt Laurel Iron Works, W. Va. 

Willi era, Johj Samuei Lit Wheeling, Ohio County. 



m - 



Lit.— Literary C'uurne. Sci. — Scientific Ourse. Opt— Optional Court*. 



4 






WEST VIEGINIA UNIVERSITY. 




I 



wpnrhjrtj gftpaxtment 



Allen, George Eastham ..Buffalo, Putnam Covnty, W. Va. 

Armstrong, Eobert P Wheeling, W. Va. 

Arnett, James Elroy Amettsville, Monongalia Co. 

Atkeson, Thomas Clark Bvffalo, Putnam Co. 

Babb, Milton Edmund.. . Luney's Creek, Grant Co. 

Baker, Henry B . East Bethlehem, WaslCtm Co., Pa 

Barker, David H Ufa, Geneva, Pa. 

Basnett, Ferdinand Samuel „ Morgantown. 

Birtcher, Calvin L... Randall, Monongalia Co. 

Blaney, Henry Clay .. Morgcmtown. 

Boyers, James S.\.« ...Randall, Monongalia Co. 

Brown, John Craig....™ Buffalo, Putnam Co. 

Brown, Wiffiara Gay ...Kingwood, Preston Co. 

Chadwiek, David ....Morgantoini. 

Core, Moses Leven...._. ....Cassville, Morumgcttia County. 

Courtney, Alpheus S Randall, " " 

Courtney, Melville Clark.. „.. " u « 

Cox, James Alfred.... ...AmettsviUe, " " 

Cox, Arthur...... Rivesville, Marion County. 

Crane, John Morris..... Kingwood, Preston " 

Criss, Sylvester II..... Phillijypi, Barbour " 

Criswell, Newton Campbell... .Moundsville, Marshall County. 

Dawson, B. William..... ...Beallsville, Washington " Pa. 

Dering, Henry Stealey Morgantown. 

Dille, Clarence Brown .... " 

Dils, George Parkersburg > Wood County. 

Downs, Ashbel Fairchild........ Geneva, Fayette County, Pa. 

Enlow, James Allen..... Oakland, Md. 

Eskey, Leonard........... Shecrard > Marshall Cmnty. 

1 _. 6 




•■-•••' 

WEST VIRGINIA ONIVERSITY. 

X 

Fife, ( yrns Krider Morgantown. 

Fitch, J amos Plammer " 

Fitch, Dorsey Plammer " 

Fleming, Julien £ " 

Frashe Lake Tippecanoe, Fayette County, Pa. 

Gale, George W Parkersburg, Wood <'<"nttij. 

Guthrie, John Wort Dunbar, Fayette County, Pa. 

Ilagans, George II Morgantown. 

1 lagans, William Lucian " 

Hall, Samuel J Laurel Point, Monongalia ( bunty. 

Ilamill, Henry P Oakland Md. 

llarpold, Curtis L Hartford City, W. Va. 

Hartley, Homer Morgantown. 

Hartley, Luther E " 

Hartman, Endress Bouck Clarksburg, Harrison County. 

Hawthorn, Richard R Newport, Kentucky. 

Hawthorn, Joseph II Randall, Monongalia County. 

Hickman, Jeremiah W Purslcy, Tyler " 

llitchins, Ilowanl Frostburg, Maryland. 

Hood, Thomas Milton Arnettsvillc, Monongalia County. 

Horner, Charles Scott Wilsonburg, Harrison " 

Unwell, Fleming Morgantown. 

Hubbard, Harry D Wheeling. 

Jackson, Charles "William Kingwood, Preston County. 

Jacobs, William Lambert Morgantown. 

Jacobs, C. Columbus White Day, Monongalia County. 

Jamison, William Calvin Laurel Point, " " 

Jones, Barton Morris Cassville, " " 

Keck, Julius M Morgantown. 

Kemp, Howard Mason Bloomington, Md. 

Kincaid, George W Morg ntown. 

Knight, George Coster Moundsvihe, Marshall County. 

Laidley, George S Charleston, Kanawha " 

Little, Thomas A Wheeling, W. Va. 

Long, Isaac McCarty New Creek, Mineral " 

McLure, Harry Wheeling, W. Va. 

JL. McRa, Waitman Clinton Mills, Monongalia Co. 

I h 7 

'<► — • — & 




WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 




Marsh, Encch Jasper St. George, Tucker County. 

Martin, John Erian Morgantown. 

Martin, Charles Alexander " 

Mitchell, Mark 

Moore, Charles Andrew " 

Morrow, Robert William '. Benwood, Marshall County. 

Nash, James Henry Buffalo, Putnam 

Nessley, Charles S Linton, Ohio. 

O'Brien, Alonzo Lee Weston, Lewis County. 

O'Connor, John Osage, Kansas. 

Parshall, Isaac II McClelland town, Pa. 

Payne, Jed Goff. Bridgeport, Harrison County. 

Payne, Waldo W " , " 

Pell, John Ringold Burning Springs, W. Va. 

Pitrat, Willie Anthony Buffalo, Putnam County. 

Protzman, Randolph Easton, Monongalia " 

Purinton, George Dana Morgantown. 

Ravenscraft, Walter Sargent Frostburg, Md. 

Reed, Charles A Wheeling, W. Va. 

Rich, Daniel Laurel Point, Monongalia County. 

Rohbins, William Lindsey Maidsville, " " 

Robinson, Eustace Leon Morgantown. 

Rogers, Daniel " 

Shay, James Coburn Easton, Monongalia County. 

Smith, Edgar Randall, " 

Smith, William Bryant. Bellaire, Ohio. 

Snodgrass, Winfield Columbus Newburg, Preston County. 

Staggers, Thomas B Morgantown. 

Stevens, Joseph Theophilus West Epping, New Hampshire. 

Stewart, Odus Sherman Arnellsville, Monongalia County. 

Talbott, John Lafayette Frenchton, Upshur County. 

Tennant, Alpheus New Brownsville, Monongalia Co. 

Warden, William Granville, 

Warden, Reger Alfred " " " 

Warman, Elza Laurel Iron Works, " u 

W T arman, Lindsey ." 

Wetzel, Daniel Elliott Burning Springs, W. Va 








WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

Wheat, Harry Lawson Wheeling, W. Va. 

Wiley, Rankin Hartford City, W. Va. 

Wilson, Edgar Woods Morgantown. 

Yates, Thornton B Grafton, Taylor County. 

Yeager, George G Randall, Monongalia County. 








WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



— f 



6 

- H 



r 






J!|f(ik§ ^ bartttiettt 



Bvt. Captain H. H. PIEUCE, U. S. Army, 



CO IMZHyEAZtsTD AFT . 



STAFF . 



Cadet CHARLES M. BABE, Second Lieut, and Adjutant. 
" MAECELLUS L. TEMPLE, First Lieut, and Ord. Officer. 



Commissioned Officers— Corps of Cadets. 

Cadet JOIEST H. DRABELL, Major. 



Cadet BEXJ. W. SMITH, Captain. 

" ISRAEL C. WHITE, First Lieutenant. 
" , Second " 




10 



t&ms* 



• # 



!' 



- 



WEST VIlKilMA DNIVERSITY. 






Drum Corps. 



John T. I Link 
\. Poreman Lazier, 
Sanmel S. Adams. 



Harry Mr Lure, 
George P. Linch, 
Thomas II. Price. 



Corps <>f Cadets. 

District. Preset* or Ji>sent. 

I ramea J. Peterson, Present for duty. 

John S. Willetts, Present for duty. 

II.. ..Israel C. White, Present for duty. 

Ellaworth E. Moran, Present for duty. 

HI....Marcellus L. Temple, Present for duty. 

Luther 11 Hartley, Present for duty. 

IV. ...Benjamin W. Smith, Present for duty. 

John S. W. Dean, Present for duty. 

V....Willey 0. Ison, Present for duty. 

Endress B. Hartman, Present fur duty. 

VI. ...John II. Drabell, Present for duty. 

Charles W. Lynch, Present for duty. 

VII.. ..James F. Brown, Present for duty. 

James II. Nash, Present for duty. 

VIII... .James T. Waters, Present for duty. 

John R. Pell, ~ Present for duty. 

IX.... William M. Howell, Present for duty. 

X.... Charles M. Babb, Present for duty. 

James J. ( 'arskadon, Present for duty. 

XI. ...Leonard Kslccy, Present for duty. 




' — - .- 



11 



,Ti"«t« , »»"»«"\.««V«'Vi»»>VW«V.M*»«\.»».>*\,M. 1 «««.M,jl , » 



«»i«W»* •>»»•>• 1..»W« 



•K.. WVI 




WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



- - — m 

* 



Normal Class. 



Allen, George Eastham. 
Atkeson, Thomas Clark 
Barker, Henry B. 
Brown, John Craig 
Core, Me^es L, 
Cox, James Alfred 
Cox, Arthur 
Dawson, E. Wflliam 
En low, James A. 
Eskey, Leonard 
Hartley, Luther E. 
Hartman, Eiidress Bouek 
Hickman, Jeremiah W. 

Warman, 



Hood, Thomas Milton 
Ison, Willey O. 
Jacobs, C. Columbus 
Keck, Julius M. 
Kincaid, George W. 
McRa, Waitman 
Mason, James II. 
Marsh, Enoch J. 
Moran, Ellsworth E. 
Nash, James II. 
Pigott, Thomas G. 
Purinton, George Dana 
Solomon. John B, 



Clem 



-; Weekly Lectures have been delivered to the Normal Class by the Professors 

I of the University during the term, as follow: 

} President Martin, two— 1st, "A knowledge of the Science of Mind essen- 

5 tial to the Teacher." 2d, "The Character of the Education needed fur an 

i Agricultural People/' 

\ Dr. Scott, two lectures on "Philology," 

i Prof. Stevens, two lectures on "Heat." 

~i Capt Pierce, one on "The Utility of Mathematics." 

i Dr. Wood, one on "The Importance and Best Method of Studying 

f Modern Languages." 

3 Prof. Glover, one on "The Study of History." 

| Prof. Solomon,— the Professor in charge— two on "The Importance of 

\ the Cultivation of Finer Sensibilities of our Nature." 

^ All the members of the Senior Class, and some of the other Classes, have 

5 been, more or less engaged in the department of instruction during the vear. 






WEST VIRGINIA 1 M 7ERSITY. 




Volunteer Labor Corps. 



Mien, 
W. .]. Arnett, 

I . I Ukeson, 
D. H. Barker, 
Y> . ( J. Brown, 
s. H.Criss, 

II. S. Dering, 
It. II. Doliver, 
l P. DoKrer, 

J. A. Km low, 
II. Hitchen* 



Many of our young men have found it pleasant and healthful to spend an ( 

hour or two per day, at a remunerative price, in improving and ornament:! g ) 

the groundp, under the direction of the Superintendent. The corps also % 

forms the nucleus of a class in practical and scientific farming and related \ 

studies. £ 



W. o. Ison, 




C. W. Lynch, 


Johns Me' leave, 


i 


J. II. Nash, 


j 


John ()( 'onnef, 




J. .1 . Peterson, 


? 


W. T. Prichard, 


1 


W. S. Ravenscraft. 


I 


T. B. Stagger*, 

J.T. Waters, 


r 


T. B. Yates, 


: - 



II ( capitulation. 



Seniors 4 

.1 amors, 1 * 

Sophomores, 10 

Freshmen 23 

Normal Students. 527 

Preparatory Students. 

T< I At 



13 . 

*i" • - - •• 




WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 




Requisites for Admission. 



I. All candidates for admission to any Department of tire University, must 
present satisfactory evidence of good moral character. 

II. Students corning from other Colleges must produce certificates of honor- 
able dismission from the same. 

III. Those entering as Students for a Degree in any Department of the 
University, must sustain an examination in the various studies of the Prepar- 
atory School of the University, or their equivalent. 

IV. Candidates for advanced standing must sustain an examination in the 
previous studies of the Department which they desire to enter. 

V. The regular examination for admission of candidates, who have not 
pursued the preliminary studies in the Preparatory School of the University, 
will take place on Friday, [June 21st], succeeding Commencement, and 
on Tuesday, [September 3rd], preceding the opening of the Fall term. 

VI. Candidates should procure a copy of the printed laws of the Univer- 
sity, also the Treasurer's receipt for tuition, before presenting themselves for 
enrollment 




14 



'-^••wn.***.* 



IW»W»V.»(^.»'».»» 




WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 




(bourses of instruction. 






The instruction thus far provided for in the University proper, is principally • 

embraced in six departments, or courses of study, viz. : Literary Department, \ 

Scientific Department, Engineering Department, Agricultural Department, \ 

and Military Department. ? 

LITERARY DEPARTMENT. 

This Department, leading to the Degree of Artium BaccalaureuB, embraces } 

studies in nine schools, as follows: ;• 

L School of Philosophy. 

Professor in charge — President Martin. \ 

In this School the instruction is given partly by the use of text books, and ; 

partly by lectures. The Literary Course includes six terms in this School. ( 

FIRST YEAR. \ 

Fall Term — Mental Philosophy— The Intellect. ) 

WINTER TERM — Mental Philosophy — The Sensibilities and the Will. } 

SECOND YEAH. I 

PALL TERM. — Moral Science — 'Wayland's. '. 

WlNTEB TERM.— Political Philosophy — International Law — Woolsey. ( 

WINTER TERM. — Sacred Philosophy — Butler's Analogy. : 

SPRING Term. — Sacred Philosophy — Natural Theology and L\\ Christianity. ; 

11. School of Astronomy and Physics, 

PROFESSOR STEVEN-. : 

This School furnishes studies in the Literary Course, extending through r 

two years. ) 

JUNIOR YEAR. •; 

PALt TERM. — Physics — Silliman's, to Chap. 1\', including problems. 

Winter '1 erm. — Pastes— Pneumatics; Acoustics; Optics. ) 

Spring Term.— Heat; Correlation of Forces; Electricity. 

I. 



I 




WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY " ^ 

i 



SENIOR YEAR. 

Winter TERM.-Astronomy-Kobmson's, Descriptive and Physical. 

Spring Term.— Practical Astronomy. 
The various branches of Physics are illustrated by means of suitable appa- 
ratus. In Astronomy, the treatment in the text book is supplemented bv 
lectures, whenever it is required, in order to represent fairly the present state 
of astronomical knowledge. 

111. School of Mathematics and Engineering. 

PROFESSOR PIERCE. 

The studies in the Classical Department of this School extend thrru.-h 
three years. * 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 
Fall Term.— Mathematics— Robinson's New University Algebra. 
A\ inter Term.— Robinson's Geometry, commencing at Book VI. 

Spring Term.- Robinson's Spherical Geometry and Trigonometry. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
Fall Term.— Engineering -Mensuration, Surveying and Navigation. 
Winter Tmm.-Mathematics-Conic Sections and Analytical Geometry, 



JUNIOR YEAR. 
Fall Term.— Mathematics— Differential and Integral Calculus. 

IV. School of Chemistry and Natural History, 

PROFESSOR STEVENSON. 
SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
Fall Term,— Inorganic Chemistry— Roscoe's. 
Winter Term.— Organic Chemistry— « 
Spring Term.— Botany— Graf s School and Field Book. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
Winter Term.— Zoology— Agassiz and Gould. 
Spring Term.— Anatomy and Physiology. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
Fall Term.— Geology— Dana. 

in 



(v 



k " ,, "" , "" , " n "' ' "' ! W .,W,, W , ,.„*C^§J Jg|| 




WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 




V. School of Greek Language and Literature 



ACTING PROFESSOR SCO! I". 
FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Term. — Herodotus — Arnold's Greek Prose Composition. [ 

Winter Term. — Homer's Iliad — Arnold (continued); Greek Grammar. 
Spring Term. — Homer's Odyssey; Arnold's Prose Comp. (completed . 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
Fall Term. — Xenophon's Memorabilia — Exercises in Greek Composition. 
Spring Term. — Plato — Crito and Apology. ; 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
Fall Term. — Euripides 1 Alcestis. (Elective. 
Spring Term. — Demosthenes— On i\ie Crown. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
Winter Term. — Sophocles — CEtlipus Tyrannus. ( Elective. ! 
Instead of the Latin and Greek of the .Junior year, the student may elect 
French, and for those of the Senior year. German; such election being made 
at the beginning of the year. 

VI. School of Latin Language arid Literature. 

ACTING PROFESSOR BCOTT. 
FRESHMAN YEAR. 
Fall Term. — Virgil — Bucolics and Georgics; Arnold's Latin Prose Comp. 
Winter Term. — Horace— Odes and Epodes. 
Spring Term. — Cicero — De Senectute or De Amicitia. 

SOPHOMORE F/EAR. 
Winter Term. — Horace — Satires and Epistles; Exercises in Latin Comp. 
Spring Term. — Livy — Lincoln's; Exercises in Latin Composition. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
Winter Term. — Tacitus — Germania and Agricola; Latin Composition 

continued, i Elective. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term.— Cicero — De Officiis; Written Exercises on Historical Sub- 
jects. (Elective, i 

n 

________ 




WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



VII. School of History and English Literature. 

PROFESSOR SOLOMON. 

Besides Themes, Declamations and Rhetorical Readings throughout the 
course, this School embraces six terms, equivalent to two years of instruction 
by text books. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 
Winter Term. — English Literature. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
Fare Term. — English Philology. 

Spring Term. — Rhetoric. 

* 

SENIOR YEAR. 
String Term. — Literary Criticism — Lord Karnes'. 

VIII School of Military Science and Tactics. 

PROFESSOR PIERCE. 
FIRST YEAR. 

First Term. — Infantry Tactics— School of the Soldier. 
Second Term. — Cavalry Tactics — Sabre Drill; Lectures. 
Third Term. — Artillery Tactics — School of the Piece. 

SECOND YEAR. 
First Term. — Infantry Tactics — School of the Company. 
Second Term. — Bayonet Exercise — Lectures. 
Third Term. — Target Practice — Small Arms. 

THIRD YEAR. 
First TERM. — Infantry Tactics — School of the Battalion. 
Second Term. — Military Engineering — Lectures. 
Third Term. — Target Practice — Heavy and Field Artillery. 

FOURTH YEAR. 
First Term. — Infantry Tactics — School of the Brigade. 
Second Term. — Science of Gunnery — Lectures; Martial Law — Lectures. 
Third Term. — Art of liar— Lectures. 

Dress Parades, Reviews, Inspections and Guard Mountings are held as 
often as is deemed expedient throughout the entire course. 

f 

L 18 



c 



--;• 




WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



IX. School of History^ Political Economy^ and Belles Lettres. ■; 

ACTING PROFESSOB GLOVER. ) 

• 
FRBSHMAM YEAR. > 

Fall Term. — Universal History. ) 

Spring Term. — Constitution of the United States and of West Virginia. ) 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. \ 

Winter Term. — Logic — Coppee's. \ 

JUNIOR YEAR. \ 

: 

SPRING TERM. — Political Economy — Bowen. \ 

SENIOR YEAR. ( 

- 

Fa i.j. Term.— History of Civilization — Guizot. ( 



SCIENTIFIC DEPARTMENT. { 

This Department, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science, embra 

studies in eight Schools, as follows: / 

I. In the School of Philosophy. 

Professor in Charge — President Martin. ( 

JUNIOR YEAR. \ 

Fall Term. — Mental Philosophy — The Intellect. ? 

Winter Term. — Menial Philosophy — The Sensibilities and the Will, ) 

SENIOR YEAR. t 

Fall Term. — Moral Science — Wayland, and Lectures. ; 

II. School of Astronomy and Physics. \ 

PROFESSOR STEVENS. \ 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. \ 

First Term. — General Principles of Physics — Silliman's. 

SECOND TERM. — Pneumatics; Acoustics; Optics; Problems. : 

THIRD TERM. — Heat; Magnetic, Statical and Dynamical Electricity. i 
JUNIOR YEAR. 



•: 



: 
: 

FIRST TERM. — Meteorology — Looniis'. } 

SECOND TERM. — Analytical Mechanics. 

THIRD TERM.— Analytical Mechanics. Completed. 



10 l I 

- '■- - --V 



pSS? , 

>;> ..~~ T " • ' • «......«.,.,....,■. ..,•...<., , , , , . ^ w; 

I WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

H"j _ 

t i 

SENIOR YEAR. 
First Term. — Physical Geography. 
Second Term,— Descriptive and Physical Astronomy. 
Third Term.— Practical Astronomy, Calculation and Graphical Construction 

of Eclipses; Solution of Problems to be verified bv the 

Nautical Almanac. 
To pursue successfully the studies of the first year of this School, students 
must have a fair acquaintance with Algebra, Geometry and Trigonometry, 
and in addition to these, should have, before commencing those of the second 
year, some knowledge of Analytical Geometry and Calculus. 

III. In the School of Mathematics and Engineerhy. 

PROFESSOR PIERCE. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 
First Term. — Robinson's University Algebra. 
Second Term. — Robinson's Geometry, beginning at Book VI. 
Third Term. — Robinson's Spherical Geometry and Trigonometry. 

SOP .HO MOKE YEAR. 
First Term.— Robinson's Mensuration, Surveying and Navigation. 
Second Term.— Robinson's Analytical Geometry and Conic Sections. 
Third Term.— Analytical Geometry, completed. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
First Term.— Differential Calculus. 
SECOND Term.— Integral Calculus. 

I V. School of Chemistry and Natural History. 

PROFESSOR STEVENSON. 
FRESHMAN YEAR. 
Fall Term. — Roscoe's Chemistry. (Inorganic). 
Winter Term.— Roscoe's Chemistry. (Organic,. 
Sp^unq Term.— Gray'* School and Field Book of Botany. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
Fall Term. — Chemical Analysis. 

Winter Term.— Agricultural Chemistry— Analysis of Soils, &c. 
Spring Term,— Manual of Agriculture. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
Winter Term.— Zoology. 

Spring Term. — Human Anatomy and Physiology — Draper's. 
SENIOR YEAR. 
ft Fall Term. — Lithological. Dynamical and Historical Geology— Dana 
1 

20 

ssp%* — • - * .■*4^m 







- - •••■ •• " •••••—• — ® 

WEST VIRGINIA [JNIVEESITY. 



] r . School of Modern languages. 

I R0FE390R WOOD. 
FRESH M VN YEAR. 

Fall Term. -French — Fasqnelle's French Course; Oral and Written Exer- 

cises. 
Win ir.iv Term. — French — Fasqnelle completed. 

Spring Term. — French — Teleinachus, or Dumas' Napoleon; Memorizing 
Sentences and Conversation. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
Fall Term— Frendi — completed. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
Fall Term. — German — Comfort's German Course;. Oral and Written Exer- 
cises. 
Spring Term. — German — Selected Poetry of Goethe; fieyse's advanced 
Grammar, and his view of German Literature. 
SENIOR YEAR. 
Winter Term. — German, continued. 
Spring Term. — German, continued. 

VI. School of English Language and Literature. 

, ■ PROFESS ■:: 80LOMON. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 
Winter Term.— Shaw's Manual of English Literature. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
Fall Term.— English Philology. 
Spring Term. — Rhetoric. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
Spring Term. — Elements of Criticism. 

VII. School of Military Science and Tactics. 
professor pierce. 
The studio- in this School are the same as those in the Literary Department. 
They are enumerated on page 18. 

VIII. School of History \ Political Economy and Belles LeUres. 
acting professor glover. 
FRESHMAN YEAR. 
Fall Term. — Universal History. 
Spring Term. — Constitution of the T"nit< d States and West Virginia. 

01 I 

M- — -V 




WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

i _ 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
Winter Term. — Logic. Coppee. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
Spring Term.— Political Economy. Bowen. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term.— History of Civilization. Guizot. 




DEPARTMENT OF EXC4IXEERIXG. 

The studies in this Department, for the first and second years, are the same 
as in the general Scientific Course. For the Junior and Senior years they 
are in the 

School of Philosophy* 
President Martin, 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
Fall Term —The Human Intellect. 
Winter Term,— The Sensibilities and the Will 

SENIOR YEAR, 
;• Fall Term.— Moral Philosophy. 

School of Astronomy and Thjslcs\ 

. PROFESSOR STEVENS, 
JUNIOR YEAR, 

Winter Term. — Analytical Meehanica. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
Winter Term.— Descriptive and Physical Astronomy. 
Spring Term. — P/actical Astronomy. 

Si-hiMj of Mathematics and -Engineering* 

PROFESSOR PIERCE. 

Fall Term. — Civil Engineering — Mahan. 
Winter Term.— Military Engineering— Mahan. 

Spring Term.— Gillespie on the Location, Construction and Improvement 
of Roads and Railroads. 

Srhool of Chemistry and Natural History. 

I*ROFESSOR STEVENSON. 

Fall Term. — Geology — Pathological, Historical and Dynamical — Dana; 
Geological Excursions. 



i* — : --• < —*& 

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT. 

In tli is Department, the Btudiea for the first and second years are the same 

as in the general Scientific Course, excepting that for Modern Languag 
substituted Lectures on various subjects related to Agriculture. Analytical 
Geometry and the Calculus are omitted. 

School of Philosophy. 

PRESIDENT MARTIN. \ 

: 
JUNIOR YEAR. -: 

Fall Term. — Mental Philosophy — The Intellect. • : 

WINTER TERM. — Mental Philosophy — The Sensibilities and the Will. : : 

SENIOR YEAR. i 

Fall Term. — Moral Science. ; 

Spring Term. — Natural Theology and Ev. of Christianity. "; 



School of Astronomy and Physics, 

PROFESSOB BTEVENS. 




i 
} 
JUNIOR YEAR. r 

i 



1 a ll Term.— Physics. 

Winter Term. — Physics. 5 

Spring Term. — Physics; Heat and Electricity. i 

School of Mathematics and Engineering. 

PROFESSOR pierce. } 

SPRING TERM. — Location and Construction of Roads — Gillespie. : 

School of Chemistry and Natural History. I 

PROFESSOR STEVENSON. '} 

Winter Term. — Dana's Text Book of Geology. 

" " Meteorology. { 



The subjects for Lectures during the course, are the following: i 

fibst -x-:ea.:r,. ;. 

Fall Term. — The Chemistry 5 Structure and Physiology of Plants; on the ( 

Water, Atmosphere and Soil as related to Vegetables; on Tillage, \ 

Draining and Manuring. r 

Winter Term. — On Domestic Animals and their Digestion, Respiration, As- \ 

similation and Excretion; on the Composition, Preparation and r' 

Value of different kinds of Food; on Milk, Butter, Cheese, Flesh ''. 

and Wool as Agricultural Products. 

23 




^ 



fe- ^ •*•- ""* •' — - — :-: 



I 



I 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



•; Spring Term. — On Horticultural and Kitchen Gardening ; on the Propagation, 

'( Training and Culture of Fruit Tree?, the Vine, Small Fruits and 

\ Vegetables. 

s SECOND YE^IR.. 

r Fall Term. — On the staple grain, forage, root and fibre crops of this and ad- 

S joining States, and their varieties and the best soils adapted for 

: them; on the preparation of soil, seeding, cultivating, harvesting 

j and preparing for market; on the Origin and Natural History of 

{ Domestic Animals; on Entomology and the Insects useful and 

\ hurtful to vegetation. « 

I Winter Term. — On the raising, care, characteristics and adaptation of different 

\ breeds*of Domestic Animals; on Cattle for beef or draught, and 

} Sheep for wool or mutton; on Horses, Swine and Poultry; on 

•; Pasturing, Soiling and Stall Feeding; on Tobacco, Hops and 

} Forestry. 

\ Spring Term. — On Rural Economy; on the History of Agriculture, with 

s sketches of the same in ancient and modern times and foreign lands; 

C on the Adaptation of Farming to soil, climate, market, and other 

} natural and economical conditions; on the different systems of 

i Husbandry, such as stock, sheep, grain and mixed farming. 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

) PIEST YIE^IR,. 

} Fall Term. — Geography — Guyot's Common School; Map Drawing; Arith- 

: metic — Stoddard's Complete; English Grammar — Etymology; 

) Latin — commenced. 

^ Winter Term. — Geography — Guyot continued; Map Drawing; Arithmetic — 

: continued; English Grammar — Syntax; Latin — Grammar and 

: Reader. 

} Spring Term. — Arithmetic — Complete; English Grammar — Analysis of Sen- 

£ tences; Latin — Grammar and Reader; Greek — Bullions' First 

• Lessons. 

} secohstid YEAB. 

/ Fall Term. — Algebra — Robinson's New University, to Involution ; Book-keep- 

\ ing; Caesar — Latin Grammar; Greek Grammar and Reader. 

i Winter Term. — Algebra — Robinson's, to Quadratics; History of the F/nited 

) States — Wilson's; Cicero's Orations — Bullions'; Latin Gram- 

: mar; Greek Grammar and Reader. 

'} Spring Term. — Geometry — Robinson's First Five Books; History of the Uni- 

( ted States, completed; Virgil — Three Books of ^Eneid ; Latin 

S Grammar; Xenophon's Anabasis; Greek Grammar. 

I Regular lessons in Writing, Spelling, Elocution and English Composition 

s from the beginning. 



24 





WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



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General Revietv of ti 



Fall 
Term. 



Literary Department. 



Algebra — finished. 

Universal History. 

Virgil — Bucolics and Georgics. 

Herodotus. 



Scientific Department. 



University Algebra. 
Universal History. 
French — commenced. 
Chemistry — Inorganii 






'ourses of Study. 



Engineering Department. 



Agricultural Department 




Spring 
Term. 



Winter 
Term. 



Geometry — completed. 
Manual of English Literature. 
Horace — Odes and Epodes. 
Homer — Iliad. 



Trigonometry. 

Constitution of U. 8. and of \V. Va. 

Cicero — De Senectute. 

Homer — Odyssey. 



Geometry — completed. 
Manual of English Literature. 
French— continued. 
Chemistry — Organic. 



Same as in General Scientific De- 
partment. 



Same as in General Scientific De- 
partment. 



Trigonometry. j 

Constitution— U. S. and W. Va. 

French. 

Botany— Physiological & Systematic 



Fall 
Term. 



Mensuration and Surveying. 
English Philology. 
Xenophon — Memorabilia. 
Chemistry — Inorganic. 



WlNTEl 

Term. 



Spring 

Term. 



Analytical Geometry. 
Lrgic. 

Horace— Satires. 
Chemistry — Organic. 



Rhetoric. 
Livy. 

Plito — Apology and Crito. 
Botany — Gray's. 



Physics — Silliman's. 

Mensuration and Surveying. 

French. 

Chemical Analysis. 



Physics — Acoustics and Optics. 

Analytical Geometry. 

Logic. 

Chemic i'i Analysis— continued. 



Physics — Heat and Electricity. 

Analytical Geometry — completed. 

Rhetoric. 

Manual of Agriculture. 



Same as in General Scientific De- 
partment. 



Physical Geography. 
Algebra. 
General History. 
Chemistry. 



Geometry. 
English Literature. 
Logic. 
Chemistry. 



Trigonometry. 

Rhetoric. 

Constitution— U. S. and West V 

Botany. 



Same as in General Scientific De- 
partment. 



Same as in General Scientific De- 
partment. 



Same as in General Scientific De- 
partment. 



For Courses of Lectures in this De- 
partment, see pages 2\i and 24. 



Fall 
Term. 



Mental Philosophy. 
Physics — commenced. 
Calculus. 
Euripides— Alcestis. 



Mental Philosophy. 
Meteorology. 
Differential Calculus. 
German — commenced. 



I Mental Philosophy— co npletedj. 
Winter] Physics — Acoustics and Optics. 
Ierm. , Tacitus— Germania and Agricoja. 



Zoology. 



Physics; Heat; Electricity. 
Spring ' Political Economy. 
1 ERM. Demosthenes — De Corona. 

Anatomy and Physiology. 



Mental Philosophy. 
Analytical Mechanics. 
Integral Calculus. . 
Zoology. 



Analytical Mechanics. 
Political Economy. 
German — continued. 
Human Anatomy. 



Fall 

Term. 



Moral Science. 
History of Civilization 
Cicero — De Officiis. 
Geology. 



Moral Science. 
Physical Geography. 
History of Civilization. 
Geology — Dana's. 



Same as in General Screntitic De- 
partment. 



Same as in General S sientific De- 
partment. 



Mental Philosophy. 

Physics. 

Land Surveying. 

Chemical Analysis. 



Mental Philosophy. 
Physics. 
Zoology. 
Analysis ol 'el 







Physics. 




Same as in Gener; 


1 Scientific De- 


Political Economy. 




partment. 




Anatomy and Physiology. 








Manual of Agriculture. 





Butler's Analogy. 
Astronomy. 



Winter 
Tkrm. International Law. 

Sophocles — CEdipus Tyrannus. 



Spring 
Term. 



Nat. Theol. and Evid. Christianity. 

Astronomy. 

Elements of Criticism. 



Butler's Analogy. 
Astronomy — Descrip. i 
International Law. 
German — continued. 

Natural Theology. 
Practical Astronomy. 
Elements of Criticism. 
German — continued. 



ind Physical. 



Moral Science. 
[I Guyot's Earth and Mar. 
|i Dana's Geology. 
I Mahan's Civil Engineering. 

I, Spherical and Physical Astronomy. 
; Military Engineering — Mahan. 
International Law. 
ji Analogy of Religion to Nature. 



Moral Philosophy. 

Meteorology. 

History of Civilization. 

Geology. 



Butler's Analogy. 
Astronomy. 
International Law. 
[ Lectures. 



Nat. Theology. 

Gillespie's Roads and Railroads. 
Practical Astronomy. 
Elements of Criticism. 



Natural Theology. 
Astronomy. 
Elements of Criticism. 
Lectures on Roads. 



To Face Page 26. 




General Review of ft 



Literary Department. 



Scientific Department. 



x 

- 

u 

ft 



Algebra — finished. 
Fall Universal History. 
Ierm. Virgil — Bucolics and Georj 

Herodotus. 



I'ni ersity ' Igebra. 
I'niv. rsal History. 
French commenced. 
Chemistry inorganic. 



metrv — completed. 
Manual of English Literature. 
Horace — Odes and Epodes. 
Homer — Iliad. 



Term. 



Trigonometry. 
Winter Constitution of l". S. and of W 
I Term. Cicero — De Senectute. 

Homer — Odyssey. 



Va. 



< Jeometry — completed. 
-Manual of English Literatur 
French— continued. 
( Ihemistry— Organic. 

nometry. 
Constitution— U. S. and W. 
French. 
Botany— Physiological & Syi 



Mensuration and Surveying. 
Fall English Philology. 
Term. Xenophon — Memorabilia. 

Chemistry — Inorganic. 



Analytical Geometrv. 
WlNTE : Lr g i Ci 

Ierm. lionu-e— Satires. 

( ihemistry — Organic. 



-ring 
2 Term. 



Rhetoric. 

Livy. 

Plato— Apology and Crito. 

Botany — Gray's. 



Physics — Silliman's. 
Mensuration and Survev' 

French. f 

( !hemical Analysis. \ 

-r., '. ~ . HI '- 

Physics— Aconsf 7 „ ~ 

Analytical G^ '""'■ "r 

Logic. Hunt? the j 

'/.< and -: 

pj r pointed ■ Board ) 

\ Departm nts of Edu- f 

rn Turtles — including a \ 



Mental Philosophy. 
Fall Physics— commenced. 
Term. Calculus. 

Euripides — Alcestis. 



s amounted to $90,000. The 

buildings and money, about 
y and immense value of such 
th of the Commonwealth and 



" Mental Philosophy— co npletetPS numbers, have resorted to | 

ER Physics— Acoustics and Opt'cs. ^100,000, with annual appro- f 

'• Tacitus— Germania and Agi ico'ft also, pursuant to the formal ■: 

>l °gy- ny with the design and .cope \ 

Agricultural College of West [ 

tslTY," in which the theory ':■ 

t department. We trust that f 

the thoroughness of its dis- } 

lie demands of the age, the £ 

second rate position among > 

Dstmction in Literature and ( 

lematics, pure and applied — t 

Butler's Analogy. .oral and social — by its reei- ? 

Astronomy. ences to educate, inform and : : 

noral principles, and supply \ 

ire as will best prepare him i 






Physics; Heat; Electricity 
Spring Political Economy. 
Ierm. Demosthenes — De Corona. 

Anatomy and Physiology. 



Moral Science. 
History of Civilization. 

Cicero — De Officiis. 
Geology. 




Sophocles — (Edipus Tyrannus. 



Nat. Theol. and Evid. ( hristiansaion in life. 
SPRING ; Astronomy. 
LERM. Elements of Criticism. 



To Face Page 26. 



•«^»«»m« , »«"U« , »«J«.< , »«»"».' 



....... --.;• 



. 



'U —^ -....„■•. ..„■... 



1- — ■•-.> - ■• n 

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Origin and Scope of the University. 






The subject of advanced edncation baa been in various forms before the i 

of West Virginia for yean, bat without any liberal provision having s 

keen made for the Bame until quite recently. The Constitution of the S 

makes it the duty of the Legislature to "foster and encourage Moral, Intellectual) •: 

S fie and Agricultural Improve m e nt ; and to make provision for the i - ganizatim } 

institutions of learning as the best interests of general education may demand? ( 

The National I iongress having donated certain lands "tn order to promote the 1- 

librnil and practical education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and i 

professions in //>," the Legislature accepted the same, anil appointed ■ Board c 

to organize the Institution, with instructions to "establish Departments of Edur z 

cation in Liu ,iil . Art, Agriculture, and Military Tatties — including a I 

vrtmentP { 

The proceeds of the sale of Congressional lands amounted to S90.000. The ^ 

: citi/.ens of Morgantown contributed in grounds, buildings and money, about f 

10. The Legislature, realizing the necessity and immense value of such v 

i an Institution; its incalculable worth to the youth of the Common wealth and } 

I of the country — scores of whom, in ever increasing numbers, have resorted to C 

[ it- halls — has increased the endowment to over $100,000,, with annual appro- r 

^ priations for current and contingent expenses. It also, pursuant to the formal Z 

I recommendation of the Governor, and in harmony with the design ami 

? of the Institution, chaaged its name from "The Agricultural College of West « 

[ Virginia," to that of "West Virginia Univebsity > m in which the theory ;- 

: and practice of agriculture remain an important department. We tru-t that f 

| in the extent and in the quality of its work, and the thoroughness of its dis- ; 

r cipline ami culture, as well as adaptation to the demands of the age, the r 

I Univebsity will prove itself deserving of no second rate position among V 

V tin- Institutions of our land. It designs by its instruction in Literature and :^ 

r* An in language, ancient and modern — in Mathematics, pure and applied — s 

'} in thi agricultural, physical, mental, moral and social — by its reci- -f 

i tations, lectures, examinations and elevating influences to educate, inform and } 

• discipline the student's mind; to strengthen his moral principles, and supply } 

£ such general and generous as well as special culture as will best prepare him I 

i for sucev.-s and usefulness in any pursuit or profession in life. : 



27 





JB° WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Departments of Instruction, 

There are six of these already in operation. 

1. Preparatory, designed to meet the wants of those who are too young, or 
who are not sufficiently advanced to enter the other Departments. 

2. Literary, in extent and exactness corresponding to that of our best 
American Colleges. 

3. Scientific, which affords a general preparation for those' pursuits that 
require extensive acquaintance with the Sciences. 

4. Engineering, civil and military, at present connected with the Scientific 
Department. 

5. Agricultural, embracing the various brandies of Agriculture, Horticul- 
ture, Rural Economy, and the Mechanic Arts. 

0. Military, which is arranged so as not only not to interfere with, but to 
promote instruction and discipline in other Departments. 

Lectureships in Civil and Constitutional Law, and in Physiology, Hygiene 
and related subjects, have also been established. 

An Optional Course is allowed those students whose special tastes or neces- 
sities prevent them from graduating in any of the regular Departments. 

A Normal Class, for the special advantage of Teachers, is formed every 
spring. In this the ordinary school studies are carefully reviewed, exactness 
and readiness in explanation and definition acquired, and instruction in the 
most approved methods of organizing and conducting schools imparted. 
There is also a weekly Lecture before the class on some subject connected 
with teaching. 

The Truste.es of the "Peabody Educational Fund," through their general 
agent, Dr. Barn as Sears, have placed at the disposal of the University, the 
sum of live hundred dollars, annually to be given to such young men of the 
Normal Department as need assistance to qualify themselves for higher use- 
fulness as teachers in West Virginia. 

Examinations. 

Three public examinations, at which all the students are required to be 
present, are held during the year; — one at the close of each term. These 
may be conducted by written papers or by oral questions. Reports of the 
deportment and scholarship of the students are sent to the parents or guardian 
after each examination in the Preparatory Department, and at the end of the 
College year in the other Departments. 



28 





•»«•«. »•!.•«. «•».»«. »•«.",,•«, , «... •«,»•,. •«./•«,".< «-...• • 

WEST VIRGINIA I'M VKRSITY. 



Calendar. 

The annual session of thirty-nine weeks is divided into three icnus of 
thirteen weeks each. An interval of a few days occurs between the Fall and 
Winter, and between the Winter ami Spring terras. Also a recess of about 
two weeks including the Christinas holidays. It i> highly important that 
students be present at the first recitation of their classes. The exercises begin 
promptly on the day designated, and any time h»t affects the standing of the 
student, and perhaps embarrasses his whole course. 

The annual Commencement Exercises are held on the third Thurdiv of 
June. The Fall Term begins on the first Wednesday of September. 
1>7'J. Thursday, June Kith, Annual Examination begins. 

Sunday. " Kith, Baccalaureate Sermon by the President. 

Tuesday. " I8tli, Regents' Prize Contest. 

Wednesday, " 19th, Address before the Literary Societies, by 

Dr. II. M. Harmon. 

Thursday, " 20th, Commencement Day. University year 1871-2 

ends. 

Tuesday, Sept'r 3d, Examination of Candidates for Admission. 
Wednesday, " 4th, Regular work of University year 1S72 .". 

begins. 
Friday, Kov'r 29th, Fall Term ends. 

Wednesday, Dec*r 4th, Winter Term begins. 
Thursday, " 19th, Christmas Recess begins. 

1>7.".. Monday, Jan'y Gth, Winter Term resumed. 
Wednesday, March 19th, Winter Term ends. 
Monday. " 24th, Spring Term begins. 

Thursday. June 19th, Spring Term ends. 

Expenses. \ 

Preparatory Department, $5.00 per Term of 13 week.-. 

Other Pepnrt men ts, 8.00 " " " " 

St i dents in the Preparatory Dtpirtment pay one dollar; in the other IV- 
pailm tnts two dollars per term contingent fee. 

Two Cadi t may he appointed by each Regent, free of charge for tuition, 
books, and sta ionery. Boarding varies from $3.00 to $4.00 per week. 

90 








p* — * — » 4 """'"" - - 

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 




Re( 



s Regents' Prizes. 

( I. To the Student who shall write the best essay upon a given subject, S25. 

| To the Student who shall be adjudged the best Declaimer, S15. These prizes 

^ to be awarded after public competition, by a committee of citizens appointed 

< by the Faculty. 

Brown Prizes. 

II, The annual sum of one hundred dollars has been placed in the Presi- 
dent's hands by Gen. G. W. Brown, of Grafton, for the encouragement of the 
Literary Societies, to be awarded for superiority in Essay, Oration, Declama- 
tion and Debate. 

Prizes Awarded. 

1869. 

f D. B. Purinton, for general deportment, $25.00 

J B.W.Smith, " " " 15.00 

M.H.Dent, " Essay, 25.00 

I W. D. Carlile, " Declamation, 15.00 

1870. 

CT. G. Edmiston, for Declamation, S10.00 

Bro WS ] W. L. Led with, " Essay, 20.00 

| A. E. McLane, " Oration, 30.00 

[M.L. Temple, " Debate, 40.00 

1870. 

f B. W. Smith, for deportment S25.00 

I R. M. Strickler, " ". 15.00 

j A. E. McLane and W. L. Ledwith, for Essay, 25.00 

[A. F. Lazier, for Declamation, 15.00 

1871. 

f.J. S. Willetts, for Declamation,. 810.00 

! D. W. Border, " Essay, 20.00 

j J. C. White, " Oration 30.00 

L D. B. Purinton, " Debate, 40.00 

1871. 

f Willey O. Ison, for Declamation, $15.00 

(Benj. W.Smith, " Essay, 25.00 



REGEXTi 



Br >\vx. 



Be cents' 



1872. 
j Harry McLure, for Declamation, $10.00 

Brown ] J ' T ' Waters > " F ~** 20 - 00 

j W. T. Prichard, " Oration, 30.00 

t J. S. Willetts, " Debate, 40.00 

30 4 

C@Sp ^= ^?^ 3 * , '""'■"""•"••••••"■•■••'"••■••"•''••"♦•"•'"•""■•-'••'■••'■'-•••■'«»« , ».'«»-»l.<«».«l.*««.»». «•••*«■ 4 , V2<^=^ -,^?) 




WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 




Discipline, 

The rules of the University require that every Student -hall be in his place 
at all stated exercises from the opening to the close of his connection with 
the University. A record is kept in which are entered the grade of Scholar- 
ship of each Student, his absence from the exercises of the Institution, his 
tardiness, or failure in recitation, unless satisfactorily accounted for. An ab- 
stract of this; record is sent at the close of each Term, and year, to parents <-r 
guardians, so that they may see what, and how their wards are studying, and 
how they stand in scholarship and deportment. In case of negligence, irreg- 
ularity, or other misconduct, the Student will be privately admonished and 
the parent or guardian will be informed pf the fact. Mere inattention to 
study will, if persisted in. insure dismission from the University. NoStudent 
is allowed to leave the town during Term time without speeial permission. 

Students from abroad, under fifteen years, shou Id have their money sent to, 
and their bills settled by, Prof. S. G. Stevens, Registrar of the University. 

_tt<l/<ji<)iis Instruction and Worship. 

The exercises of each day are opened with reading the Scripture- and 
prayer, at which all the Students are required to be present. They are also 
required to attend regularly some plaee of religious worship on the Sabbath, 
and on all occasions to treat the institutions of religion with respect. 

Library. 

A respectable beginning towards a University Library has already been 
made. ( )ver two thousand volumes have been carefully selected and placed 
on its shelves, including not only many choice and valuable books of reference, 
but also standard works in the various departments of History, Biography, 
Theology, Agriculture, Art, Science and General Literature. 

We respectfully request the friends of Education to make contributions to 

Its shelves. Very valuable donations have been received during the past 

year, chief among which is a full sett of " The Transactions of the New York 

Agricultural Society" from 18G0 to 1869, inclusive, through Hon. T. L. 

Harison. 

1 pies of the Daily Wheeling Intelligencer and 2ri-Weekly Wheeling Register, 
and of nearly all the weekly journals in the State, as well as several from 
other State-, have been cheerfully donated to the Reading Room of the Uni- 
versity. We trust these are but the beginnings of larger gifts. 

Museum, Apparatus, Sfc. 

The University is in possession of apparatus requisite for thorougb illus- 
tration of C'hemi<try and Physics. 

Several valuable articles of apparatus have been obtained for the depart- 
ment of Astronomy and Physics, including a Smithsonian Barometer, by 
( rreene, of New York ; a Sextant, by Crichton, of London, and a (lock, with 

± ,-., 



gg "T^> - ' ?pM 

", WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. , 

I : 

Zinc Compensation, by E. Howard & Co., of Boston. A 7 ft. Telescope is in 
process of construction by John Byrne, of New York, and is to be completed 
by the 1st of May, in season for the use of the class of 1872. It will be equa- 
torially mounted with right ascension and declination circles, and is guaran- 
teed as a first class instrument in every respect. 

The Museum contains extensive Mineralogical, Geological and Concholog- 
ieal cabinets, together with many specimens in other departments of Natural 
History. We request all who are interested in such matters to send suitable 
specimens for the Museum, especially Indian relics, shells, minerals, fossil.-, 
and alcoholic specimens of animals. Such donations will be acknowledged 
and carefully labeled with the name of the donor. There are already over 
2000 specimens of minerals and fobsils, and more than 2,300 of recent shells. 

The vicinity of the University offers unrivalled advantages for the study of 
practical Geology. Especial attention will be paid to this branch. 

The laboratory of Practical Chemistry is in operation. The instruction for 
the present is devoted chiefly to analysis, with its application to agriculture. 

Donations have been received during the year, as follows. 
Minerals. — John Gebbard, jr.; Kev'd W. L. Hind man; L. S. Hough; J. T. 

Harris; G. P. Linch; and Dr. F. H. Youst. 
Shells— M. II. Dent: Mrs. Dr. Parks; Smithsonian Institute. 
Nests and Eggs.— D. W. Border; A. H. Troxell; R. H. Dolliver; M. Jackson. 
Coins. — Duryee Beekman; J. A. Dille; F. S. Lyon; W. I. Protzman; D. II. 

Sline; Clarissa Evans; R. P. Armstrong. 
Indian Relics.— R. P. McCrnm; G. K. Osgood: Dr. F. H. Youst. 

I Ore* fur Laboratory. — G. P. Linch. 

^ Grahamite. — Dr. Alex. Martin; tine specimen. 

I Catamites Approximatir.<. — Col. A. S. Vance. 

) Misee'la neons. — N. N. Hoffman ; F. S. Lyon; W. T. YVilley; Dr. Joseph A. 

£- McLane; Dr. H. N. Mackey. 

^ Special acknowledgements are due to the Smithsonian Institute for several 

:[ hundred species of shells, and many specimens of rocks, minerals, Ac. 

\ Also to the United States Patent Office for nine boxes containing about one 

r thousand Models fur illustration in Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, in 

\ Mining, Engineering, Naval and Military affairs. Ax. 

} Also to the Agricultural Department for seeds, Ac. 

f Military Science and Tactics. 

\ The National endowment of the University requires provision to be made 

r for instruction in Military Tactics The Board of Regents has provided the 

\ facilities for carrying out these obligations. Experience has demonstrated 

} the wisdom of the plan. 

I The Course of Instruction embraces Infantry, Cavalry, and Artillery Tae- 

.- tics; the use of the Bayonet and Sabre; Ordnance and Gunnery; Military 
;ineering, and the Science of War. 



| ,-:„ 






' VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 




Attendance upon the exercises ia made obligatory upon Cadets, and the 
regular University classes, unless exempted therefrom, by the Faculty for 
adequate cause. 

A full uniform lias been adopted tor the Cadets, t<. ho made after the 
University pattern, harmonizing as far as may be, the elements of neat 
economy and utility. 

The exeroi-es occupy one hour daily, on the afternoon of Monday. 
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday of each week, at times not to conflict 
with regular recitations. 

Instruction is given in the form of class lectures on the Bubject of Science 
of Gunnery, Military Engineering, and the Art of "War. 

During the past year, the United States Government generously furnished 
$5,000,00 worth of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores, for the special benefit of 
this Department. The Arms and Equipments are of the mosl improved, 
modern construction. 

Literary Societies. 

There are two of these in connection with the University, furnished with 
suitable halls, and whose exercises in Composition, Reading, Orations, Debate 
and Criticism are, in many respects, of great advantage to the student. They 
also afford facilities fur the study of, and acquaintance with Parliamentary 
forms, and the acquisition of business habits. The authorities of the Uni- 
versity will afford every facility for increasing the accommodations and iim- 
fulness of thes€ valuable auxiliaries. 

Location. 

Morgantown, the seat of the University, is beautifully located on the right 
hank of the Monongahela river, Monongalia County, West Virginia. The 
:y around is exceedingly attractive and picturesque. The place has 
long been famous for its social, intellectual and moral culture, and general 
healthfullness. Coaches leave every morning to and from Fairmont, on the 
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. There is also a daily conveyance between 
Morgantown and Uniontown, Pa. Steamboats from Pittsburgh arrive every 
day at Geneva, twelve miles below Morgantown, and at Morgantown twice 
each week. A place more eligible for the quiet and successful pursuit of 
Science and Literature is nowhere to be found. 

The New University Building, 

Now completed, is a model of architectural beauty mid convenient arrange- 
ment, greatly increasing the facilities for carrying out the noble designs for 
which the University was established. 






iSh, 33 






CATALOGUE 



OK THF. 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



i 



n i 




It 



r$l Uinpia itnivrrsk 



FOR THE YEAR 



1872-73. 





MORG \XTOWN: 

MOB&ABa Hoffman, BOOB AM> JOB-FRXOTEBG 

i87a 






Board of Regents. 



No. of District. Name of Regent. P. 0. Address. 

1. - - - T. H. LOGAN, President, - - - Wheeling. 

2. - - - JAMES MORROW, ----- Fairmont. 

3. - - - GEORGE M. HAGANS, - - - - Morgantown. 

4. - - - SAMUEL BILLINGSLEY, - - - Middlebourne. 

5. - - - D. H. LEONARD, Elizabeth. 

6. - - - J. LOOMIS GOULD, Buckhannon. 

7. - - - W. W. HARPER, Point Pleasant. 

8. - - - ISAIAH BEE, Princeton, 

9. - - - ALEX. F. MATHEWS, - - - - Lewisburg. 

10. - - - JAMES CARSKADON, - - . - - New Creek. 

11. - - - GEO. M. BELTZHOOVER, - - - Shepherdstown. 



GEORGE M. HAGANS, 

JOHN A. DILLE, 

GEORGE C. STURGISS, 

ALEX. MARTIN, 

L. S. HOUGH, 

A. W. LORENTZ, Treasurer. 

G. C. STURGISS, Secretary. 



Executive Committee. 





Compliments of 

Alexander Mar/in. 



f nroliii mh Iffftfft- 







REV. ALKX. MARTIN, D.D., President, 

Ami Proftaeorof Mental hihI Mural Betona*. 

s. Gh STEVENS, A. M., Vice President, 

And Prnfessor of Astronomy and PIivshm. 

II. JL PIERCE, Bvt. Capt. U. S. A., ,, ihPariail . 

Professor of Mathematics and Military Science. 

P. W. WOOD, A. M., Ph. D., 

Professor of Modem Languages and Literature. 

♦REV. J. B. SOLOMON", A. B., 

Professor of English Literature, and Principal of Preparatory Department. 

REV. JOHN W. SCOTT, D. D., LL. D., 

Professor of Ancient Languages and Literature. 

GEO. N. GLOVER, A. M., Secretary, 

Professor of History, Political Economy, and Belles Lettres. 

WILLIAM M. FONTAINE, A. M., 

Professor of Agriculture, Chemistry, and Natural History. 

F. S. LYON, A. M., 

Acting Professor of English Literature, and Principal of Preparatory Department. 

BENJAMIN W. SMITH, 

Tutor in the Preparatory Department. 

GEORGE M. HAGANS, Esq., 

Superintendent of Grounds and Building!. 

HUGH W. BROCK, M. D., 

Lecturer on Physiology and Hygiene. 

HON. JOHN A. DILLE, 

Lecturer on Civil and Constitutional Law. 

SERG'T. THOS. L. WATSON, M.uoro>o B iei eb-™, 

And Instructor in Signalizing and Telegraphy. : 



*To March 24th, 1873. 




72 - : 




WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 




-Mi? 

Seniors. 

Babb, Charles Montgomery Lit Locust Grove, Grant County. 

Border, Daniel Webster Lit Shepherdstown, Jefferson Co. 

Boughner, W t illiam Le Roy Sci Morgantown. 

Brown, James Frederic Lit Charleston, Kanawha County. 

Bullock, Edmund Tanner Lit Parkersburg, Wood County. 

Harris, John Thomas Sci Harrisville, Ritchie County. 

Linch, George Preston Sci Wheeling, Ohio County. 

McClure, Taylor Bascom Sci Louisa, Lawrence County, Ky. 

Price, Thomas Horner Sci Mooresville, Monongalia Co. 

Prichard, William Taylor Sci Manningi/m, Marion Co. 

Purinton, Daniel Boardman Lit Morga ntown . 

Temple, Marcellus Luther Lit Wadestoun, Monongalia Co. 

Waters, James Talman Lit New York- City. 

Juniors. 

Dean, John Shreve William Lit Buckhannon, Upshur County. 

Howell, William Moses Lit Morgantown. 

Jacobs. Thomas Perry Lit u 

Lynch, Charles Wesley Lit Brown's Creek, Harrison Co. 

*Moran, Ellsworth Elza Lit Forksburg, Marion Co. 

Woods, Frank Lit Philippi, Barbour Co. 

Sojrfiomores. 

Adams, Samuel Shugert Lit Washington City, D. C. 

Allen, Guy Richard CHAMPLiNE...Lit Morgantoim. 

|Arnett, William Jerome Lit Arnettsville, Monongalia Co. 

Doliyer, Robert H Lit Morgantoun . 

Doliyer, Jonathan Prentiss Lit " 

Martin, James Virginii is Lit " 

McCleave, Johns Lit Cumberland, Md. 

McCrum, Lloyd Sci German Settlement, Preston Co. 

Peterson, James Jackson Lit Weston, Lewis Co. 

Purinton, A a ron L yon L it Morgantown. 

Willetts, John Samuel.. Lit Wheeling, Ohio Co. 

Lit.— Literary Course. Sci.— Scientific Course. Conditioned. f Deceased. 

4 







\\ EST VIRGINIA FNIYKKSITY 



Freshmen. 

Rabb, Milton Edward Opt Lune^a Creek, Crant ('uunty. 

Bowers, William Mki.am tiion Sci Summit PoiAt, Jeffermm Co. 

Buyers, Jame> S Opt tbmdcUl, Monongalia 

Cak^kadon, Jami> Thornton Sci Headmritk, Mineral Co. 

Coke, Moses Leven Lit Cassville, Mononyalia Co. 

CoRPENNING, Edward MoG Opt Bridgeport, Harrison Co. 

Dawson, K. William Opt Beallsville, WasVton Co., Pa. 

DlLS, George Opt Parkersbitry. 

Eskey, Leonard Sci SJurrard, Marshall Co. 

*Frasher, Luke H Lit Tippecanoe, Fayette Co., Pa. 

*Hamill, Henry Phelps Sci Oakland, Md. 

Hartley, LtTTHEB Opt Masontown, Preston Co. 

Haitman, En dress Bouck Opt Clarksburg, Harrison Co. 

HlCKMAN, Jeremiah W Opt Pursley, Tyler Co. 

Hubbard, Harry Dana Opt Wheeling. 

l»>s, Willey Owens Lit Parkersburg. 

Kemp, Howard Ma>on Opt Bloomington, Md. 

Kmuht, George Coster Opt HomwtdmHOe, Marsfudl Co. 

Lajdley, George Summers Sci Charleston, Kanaivlui Co. 

*Long, Isaac McCarty Sci New Creek, Mineral Co. 

Moure, Charles Andrew Opt Morgantown. 

Morgan, Benjamin Stephen Lit Laurel Point, Monongalia Co. 

*Xash, James Henry Sci Buffalo, Putnam Co. 

Ogden, Jay Franklin Opt Shinnston, Harrison Co. 

*Parshall, Isaac Hamilton Lit McClellandtoum, Pa. 

Payne, Jed Goek Lit Bridgeport, Harrison Co. 

Payne, Waldo W Lit 

*Rogers, Daniei Lit Morgantou-n. 

Swanx, Ferdinand R Lit Honey Grove, Texas. 

Wetzel, Daniel Elliott Opt Burning Spring, Wirt Co. 

Wilky, Rankin Jr Opt Hartford City, Mason Co. 

*Wu>on, Edgar Wood Lit Morgantoim. 




Lit— LiUrary Course. Sci.— Scientific Course. Opt.— Optional Course. *Couditioned 





WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 




Preparatory Department. 

IFIDRST YEAB. 

Bowman, Thomas W Valley Furnace, Barbour Co. 

Brooke, William H Oakland, Md. 

Burdett, John S. Jr Charleston, Kanawha Co. 

Clay, Burwell W Jarrett's Ford, " 

Coleman, Theodore V Morgantown. 

Coogle, William Arnettsville, Monongalia, Co. 

Courtney, Melville C Randall, " " 

Crisswell, Everett H Moundsville, Marshall Co. 

Crisswell, Newton C 

Davis, John M Maidsville, Monongalia Co. 

Dering, Henry S Morgantown. 

Douglass, Elijah Ripley Landing, Jackson Co. 

Enlow, James A Oakland, Md. 

Fitch, Dorsey P Morgantown. 

Hagans, William Lucian " : 

Harris, Perry B Moundsville, Marshall Co. * 

Hawthorne, Richard R Newport u Ky. 5 

Hinkle, Job W Buckhannon, Upshur Co. ) 

Hoffman, William K Morgantown. \ 

John, George M " \ 

Kester, Thomas St. Mary's, Pleasants Co. 

Kincaid, George W Morgantown. ) 

Klieves, Frank A Wheeling. \ 

List, William B " \ 

Martin, William J Buckhannon Upshur County. \ 

Mercer, James E Ray's Flats, Marion " ) 

Morgan, Marcus Charleston, Kanawha " 

Murphey, Jonathan C Maidsville, Monongalia Co. \ 

Parsons,' Mark D. M Ripley, Jackson Co. I 

Paugh, Isaiah C Oakland, Md. : 

Pifer, Felix C Buckhannon, Upshur Co. 

Pinnell, Charles S. C 

6 






WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 




Protziuan, Lowell M Morgantown. 

Ravenscraft, Walter S Frostburg, Md. 

Ruttencutter, Green St. Mary's, Pleasants County. 

Shaw, Z Barton, Md. 

Shields, William H Charleston, Kanawha County. 

Slack, Edward B 

Somerville, Robert L Barton, Md. 

Tabler, George W. M Martinsbury, Berkeley Co. 

Tillson, Clarence H Deer Park, Garrett Co., Md. 

Vandervort, Virgil Easton, Monongalia Co. 

Wade, Clarke C Morgantown-. 

Warden, William Granville, Monongalia Co. 

Warden, Alfred R 

Weltner, Charles W Ch-ay' s Landing, Greene Co., Pa. 

Wetzel, John F. P Burning Springs, Wirt Co. 

Wilson, Andrew Jr Wlieeling. 



Preparatory Department. 

SZECOZLsTID YIE^LZR,. 

• Arnett, James E Arnettsville, Monongalia Co. 

\ Brown, William G. Jr Kingwood, Preston 

} Chadwick, David E Morgantown. 

} Courtnev, Alpheus F Randall, Monongalia Co. 

i Cox, Arthur Rivesville, Marian M 

: Cox, James A Arnettsville, Monongalia Co. 

} Dille, Clarence B Morgantown. 

Downs, Ashbel F New Geneva, Fayette Co., Pa. 

Fleming, Julian E Morgantown. 

Harrison, Samuel R Clarksburg, Harrison County. 

Hood, Thomas M Arnettsville, Monongalia " 

Howell, Fleming Morgantown. 

Jacobs, William L 

Keck, Julius M 

Koontz, Albert '. Easton, Monongalia Co. 

Long, Daniel M. L Mt. Morris, Greene Co., Pa 







WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 
W 

Martin, John Errian Morgantoum. 

Martin, Charles Alexander " 

Prickitt, Nathan iel C Ravensvood, Jackson Co. 

Pritchard, Alpheus W Clarksburg, Harrison " 

Pritchard, R. Carr 

Purinton, George D Morgantoicn. 

Ramage, Thomas C West MUford, Harrison Co. 

Rich, Daniel Laurel Point, Monongalia Co. 

Rose, John Lucasville, Scioto Co., Ohio. 

Simpson, John .Parkersburg. 

Smith, Everett C Spencer, Roane Co. 

Steele, John Lorentz Grafton, Taylor " 

Stewart, Odus S Arnettsville, Monongalia, Co. 

Temple, Harry V Wadestown, " " 

Vandervort, James W Chicago, Illinois. 

Warman , Lindsay Laurel Iron Works, Monong. Co. 

Wirgman, Henry T Romney, Hampshire Co. 

Woods, J. Hopkins PhUippi, Barbour Co. 






WEST VIRGIN] \ UNIVERSITY. 




Normal Class. 



Border, Daniel W. 

Bowers, William M. 
Beyers, James S. 
Brown, James F. 
Bullock, Edmund T. 
Coleman, Theodore V. 
Courtney, AJpheofl F. 
Courtney, Melville C. 
Davis, John M. 
Knlow, James 
Eskey, Leonard 
Hickman, Jeremiah W. 
[son, Willey 0. 
Laidley, Ceorge S. 
Long, Daniel M. L. 
McClure, Taylor B. 



Mercer, James E. 

Murjilu v, Jonathan C. 
Nash, . I aines 1 1. 
Ogden, Jay F. 
Paugh, Isaiah ( '. 
Titer, Felix C. 
Prickett, Nathaniel C. 
Pritchard, K. Carr 
Protzman, Lowell M. 
Rich, Daniel 
Smith, Everett C. 
Stewart, Odus S. 
Tahler, Ceorge W. ML 
Vandervort, James W. 
Warman, Lindsay 
Waters, James T. 



This Class is conducted strictly as a Teachers Class. It is under the inmie- 
mediate direction and instruction of the Professor of English Literature, 
assisted by the other Professors, who deliver weekly lectures before the Class 
on some subject especially related to the Teacher's profession. 







1«M 

fa 




-^tpiknt 



Bvt. Captain H. H. PIEUCE, U. S. Army, 



cojmli&j^i&idj^jx-t. 



STAFF. 

Cadet JAMES F. BUOWN, First Lieutenant and Adjutant, 
" MAECELLUS L. TEMPLE, First Lieut, and Ord. Officer. 



COMMISSIONED OFFICERS. 



Cadet CHARLES M. BABB, Captain. 

JAMES T. WATERS, First Lieutenant. 
." ¥M. M. HOWELL, Second Lieutenant. 
DAKTEL W. BORDER, Bvt. Second Lieut. 




10 





WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



STATE CADETS. 



Cadet JOHN S. W. LEAN, First Sergeant. 
" JAMES J. PETERSON, Second Sergeant. 



District. | 



Name. 



| When confirmed. 



I. 

II. 

III. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

IX. 



XL 



James J. Peterson, 

John 8. Willetts, 

I •'. E. Bforan, 

Thos. M. Hood, 

Marcellns L. Temple,. 



John S. W. Dean, 

Jeremiah W. Hickman, 

Willey O.Ison, 

Leonard Eskey, 

Charles \V. Lynch, 

Felix C. Pifer, 

James F. Brown,, 

James H. Nash, 

James T. Waters, 



William M. Howell- 
George W. M. Tabler, 

Charles M. Babb, 

James T. Carskadon,.. 

Daniel W. Border, 

William M. Bowers,.. 



Oct. 20th, 1870. 
Dec. 6th, 1870. 
Nov. 30th, 1869. 
Dec. 13th, 1872. 
Feb. 4th, 1870. 

Jan. 8th, 1870. 
Dec. 13th, 1872. 
Oct. 20th, 1870. 
Nov. 13th, 1871. 
Jan. 6th, 1871. 
Dec. 13th, 1872. 
Jan. 27th, 1871. 
Oct. 16th, 1871. 
Oct. 9th, 1871. 

Feb. 16th, 1870. 
Dec. 13th, 1872. 
Jurte 9th, 1869. 
Oct. 20th, 1870. 
Sept. 6th, 1872. 
Dec. 13th, 1872. 



* DISTINGUISHED CADETS— 1872. 

John H. Drabell, Literary. Military. 

Benjamin W.Smith, do. 

Marcellns L. Temple, do. 

Israel O. White, do. Military. 

Charles M. Babb do. do. 

William M. Howell, do. do. 

Charles W. Lynch, do. do. 

James T. Waters, do. do. 

James F. Brown, do. 

John S. Willetts, do. Military. 

John S. W. Dean, do. do. 

James T. Carskadon, do. 

Willey O. Ison,.. Literary. do. 

James H. Nash, do. do. 

Leonard Eskey, do. do. 

James J. Peterson, do. do. 



{ ___ ; 

■ * In accordance with the Rules and Regulations established for the govern 

fr Corps, the above Cadets were reported as distinguished in the departments oj 

•4&. names. 



ment of the 
pposite their 



11 





WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 




Volunteer Labor Corps. 



Bowers, William M 
Brown, William G. 
Burdett, John S. 
Carskadon, James T. 
Courtney, Alpheus F. 
Cox, James A. 
Criswell, Everett H. 
Doliver, Jonathan P. 
Douglass, Elijah 
Downs, Ashbel F. 
Eskey, Leonard 
Hood, Thomas M. 
Ison, Willey O. 
Kemp, Howard M. 



Ferdinand R. Swank, Captain. 



Laidley, George S. 
.Martin, Charles A. 
Payne, Jed G. 
Payne, Waldo W. 
Paugh, Isaiah C. 
Prickitt, Nathaniel C. 
Pritchard, R. Carr 
Ravenscraft, Walter S. 
Shields, William H. 
Slack, Edward B. 
Smith, Everett C. 
Vandervort, James W. 
Weltner, Charles W. 
Wiley, Rankin Jr. 



Klieves, Frank A. 

Several of our young men have found it pleasant and healthful to spend an 
hour or two pe»day, at a remunerative price, in improving and ornamenting 
the grounds, under the direction of the Superintendent. The corps also forms 
the nucleus of a class in practical and scientific farming and related studies 



Recapitulation. 

Seniors, 

Juniors, 

Sophomores, .... 

Freshmen, 

*" oZi 

Normal Students, 09 

First Preparatory Students, 4g 

Second " « 

• o4 

Total, — 

12 






WEST VIRGIN] \ INIVKIMTV. 





nstructioo. 



-y 



The instruction thus far provided for in the I'niversitv, is principally em- 
braced in live departments, or courses of study, viz: Literary Department, 
Scientific Department, Agricultural Department, Military Department; and 
for those desiring to qualify themselves for regular admission to any of the 
former, a Preparatory Department. 

LITERARY DEPARTMENT. 

This Department, leading to the Degree of Artium Baccalaureus, embraces 
studies in nine schools, as follows: 

I. School of Philosophy. 

PRESIDENT MARTIN. 
In this School the instruction is given partly by the use of text books, and 
partly by lectures. The Literary Course includes six tenus in this School. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Mental Philosophy — The Instincts and The Intellect. 

Winter Term. — Mental Philosophy — The Sensibilities and the Will. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term.— Moral Philosophy. 

Winter Term. — Political Philosophy — International Law — Woolsey. 
Spking Term. — Sacred Philosophy— Butler's Analogy. 

" " " " Natural Theology and Ev. Christianity. 

77. School of Astronomy and Physics. 

PROFESSOR STEVENS. 
This School furnishes studies in the Literary Course, extending through 
five terms. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
Fall Term. — Physics — General Principles — Solids and Fluids. 
Winter Term. — Physics — Pneumatics; Acoustics; Optics. 
Spring Tkrm. — Heat; Correlation of Forces; Electricity. 

13 






WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. &f 



SENIOR YEAR. 
Winter Term. — Astronomy — Loomis' — XII Chapters. 
Spring Term. — Astronomy — completed. 
The various branches of Physics are illustrated by means of suitable appa- 
ratus. In these and in Astronomy, the treatment in the text book is supple- 
mented by lectures, whenever it is required, in order to represent fairly the 
present state of scientific progress. 

III. School of Mathematics and Engineering. 

PROFESSOR PIERCE. 
The studies in the Literary Department of this School extend through six 
terms. 

FRESHMAN TEAR. 
Fall Term. — Mathematics — Robinson's New University Algebra. 
Winter Term. — " Robinson's Geometry, commencing at Book VI. 
Spring Term. — " Robinson's Spherical Geometry and Trigonometry. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
Fall Term. — Engineering — Mensuration, Surveying and Navigation. 
Winter Term. — Mathematics — Analytical Geometry. 
Spring " " Analytical Geometry. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
Fall Teem. — Mathematics — Differential Calculus. 
Winter " " Integral Calculus. 

IV. School of Chemistry and Natural History. 

PROFESSOR FONTAINE. 
SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
Fall Term. — Inorganic Chemistry — Eliot and Storer. 
Winter Term.— Organic " " " " 

Spring Term.— Botany— Gray's School and Field Book. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
Winter Term. — Zoology — Nicholson's. 
Spring Term. — Anatomy and Physiology. 

SENIOR YEAR. \ 

t 

Fall Term. — Geology — Dana. 

14 

lil>.i>t,l<„>l l >i > ,>l.l<|,M i f<t,>l,tM..| 1 l>t l.'l.iitill.lll.MUlWhlM.llt.ll.Kl.ll.Kl.'l.lll.'l.ll 






WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



V. Sr hool of Greek Lang uag< <iml Literature, 

PROFESSOR SCOTT. 
FRESHMAN YEAR. 
Fall Term. — Herodotus — Arnold's Greek Prose Composition. 
Winter Term. — Horner'* Iliad — Arnold (continued); Greek Grammar. 
SPRING Term.— Homer's Iliad; Arnold's Prose Corap. (completed). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
Fall Term. — Xenophon's Memorabilia — Exercises in Greek Composition. 
Spring Term.— Plato— Crito and Apology. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
Fall Term. — Euripides' Alcestis. (Elective). 
Spring Term. — Demosthenes — On the Crown. (Elective^. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
Winter Term. — Sophocles — CEdipus Tyrannus. (Elective). 
Instead of the Latin and Greek of the Junior year, the student may elect 
French, and for those of the Senior year, German ; such electipn being made 
at the beginning of the year. 

VI. School of Latin Language and Literature. 

PROFESSOR SCOTT. 
FRESHMAN YEAR. 
Fall Term. — Virgil — Bucolics and Georgics; Arnold's Latin Prose Comp. 
Winter Term. — Horace — Odes and Epodes. 
Spring Term. — Cicero — De Senectute or De Amicitia. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
Winter Term. — Horace — Satires and Epistles; Exercises in Latin Comp. 
String Term. — Livy — Lincoln's; Exercises in Latin Composition. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
Winter Term. — Tacitus — Germania and Agricola; Latin Composition 
continued. (Selective.) 

SENIOR YEAR. 
Fall Term. — Cicero — De Officiis; Written Exercises on Historical Sub- 
jects. (Elective.) 

VII. School of History, Political Economy, and Belles Lettres. 

PROFESSOR GLOVER. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 
Fall Term. — Universal History. 
Spring Term. — Constitution of the United States and of West Virginia. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
W i nter Term. — Logic — Coppee's. 

15 






WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 




JUNIOR YEAR. 
Spuing Term. — Political Economy — Bowen. 
SENIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Historv of Civilization — Guizot. 

r 

VIII. School of English Literature. 

ACTING PROFESSOR LYON. 
Besides Themes, Declamations and Rhetorical Readings throughout the 
course, this School embraces four terms of instruction by text books. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Winter Term. — English Literature. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Fall Term. — English Philology. 
Spring Term. — Rhetoric. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Winter Term. — Literary Criticism — Lord Karnes'. 

IX. School of Military Science and Taeths. 

PROFESSOR PIERCE. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term. — Infantry Tactics — School of the Soldier. , 
Second Term. — Infantry Tactics — School of the Company. 
Third Term. — Infantry Tactics — Bayonet Exercises. 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term. — Infantry Tactics — School of the Battalion. 

Second Term. — Oaoalry Tactics — Sabre Drill. 

Third Term. — Target Practice — Artillery and Small Arms. 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Term. — Infantry Tactics and Practice. 

Second Term. — Artillery Tactics. 

Third Term. — Target Practice— Heavy and Field Artillery. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Infantry Tactics — School of the Brigade. 

Second Term. — Ordnance and Gunnery. 

Third Year. — Advanced Guard and Outpost duty. 

Press Parades, Reviews, Inspections and Guard Mountings, are held as 
often as is deemed expedient throughout the entire course. 




16 





WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 




s«'!K\TTFIC DEPARTMENT. 



This Department, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science, embraces 
studies in eight Schools, as follows : 

1. In the School of Philosophy. 

PRESIDENT MARTIN. 
JUNIOR YEAR. 
Fall Term. — Mental Philosophy — The Intellect. 
Winter/Term. — Mental Philosophy — The Sensibilities and the Will. 
SENIOR YEAR. 
Fall Term.— Moral Science — Wayland's. 

Winter Term. — Political Philosophy — International Law — Woolsey. 
Spring,Term. — Sacred Philosophy — Butler's Analogy. 

Nat Theology and Ev. Christianity. 

II. School of Astronomy and Physics. 

PROFESSOR STEVENS. 
SOPHOMORE' YEAR. 
First Term. — General Principles of Physics — Solids and Fluids. 
Second Term. — Undulations; Acoustics; Optics; Problems. 
Third Term. — Heat", Magnetic, Statical and Dynamical Electricity. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
First' Term. — Meteorology — Loomis'. 
Second'Term. — Analytical Mechanics. 
Third Term.— Analytical Mechanics. Completed. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
First' Term. — Physical Geography. 
Second Term. — Descriptive and Physical Astronomy. 
Third Term. — Practical Astronomy, Calculation and Graphical Con- 
struction of Eclipses; Solution- of Problems to be 
verified by the Nautical Almanac. 
To pursue successfully the studies of the first year of this School, 
students must have a fair acquaintance with Algebra, Geometry and 
Trigonometry, and in addition to these, before commencing Analytical 
Mechanics, some knowledge of Analytical Geometry and Calculus. 

17 






WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



III. In the School of Mathematics and Engineering. 

) PROFESSOR PIERCE. 

\ FRESHMAN YEAR. 

3 First Term. — Robinson's University Algebra. 

s Second " Robinson's Geometry, beginning at Book VI. 

\ Third " Robinson's Spherical Geometry and Trigonometry. 

£ SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term. — Robinson's Mensuration, Surveying and Navigation. 

Second " Olney's Analytical Geometry. 
i Third " Analytical Geometry, completed. 

\ JUNIOR YEAR. 

s 

t First Term.— Differential Calculus. 

} Second " Integral Calculus. 

I IV. School of Chemistry and Natural History. 

I PROFESSOR FONTAINE. 

\ FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Eliot and Storer's Chemistry. (Inorganic.) 

\ Winter Term. — Chemistry. (Organic.) 

\ Spring Term. — Gray's School and Field Book of Botany. 
{ SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

£ Fall Term. — Chemical Analysis. 

} Winter Term.— Agricultural Chemistry — Analysis of Soils, &c. 

\ Spring Term. — Manual of Agriculture. 
{ JUNIOR YEAR. 

-: Winter Term. — Zoology. 

) Spring Term. — Human Anatomy and Physiology — Draper's. 
\ SENIOR YEAR. 

\ Fall Term. — Lithological, Dynamical and Historical Geology — Dana. 

X V. School of Modern Languages. 

'} PROFESSOR WOOD. 

) FRESHMAN YEAR. 

{ Fall Term. — French — Fasquelle's French Course ; Oral and Written 

} Exercises. 

S Winter Term. — French — Fasquelle, completed. 

\ Spring Term. — French — Telemachus, or Dumas' Napoleon ; Memori- 
zing Sentences and Conversation. 

18 







WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 




SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
Fall Term. — French — Completed. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term. — German — Comfort's German Coarse; Oral and Written 
Exercises. 

Spring Term. — German — Selected Poetry of Goethe; Heyse's ad- 
vanced Grammar, and hi9 view of German Literature. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
Winter Term. — German, continued. 
Spring Term.— German, continued. 

VI. School of History, Political Economy and Belles Lettres. 

PROFESSOR GLOVER. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 
Fall Term. — Universal History. 
Spring Term.— Constitution of the United States and West Virginia. 



Winter Term.— Logic. Coppee. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
Spring Term.— Political Economy. Bowen. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
Fall Term. — History of Civilization. Guizot. 

VII. School of English Language and Literature. 

ACTING PROFESSOR LYON. 
FRESHMAN YEAR. 
Winter Term.— Hart's English Literature. 
SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Spring Term.— Rhetoric. 
r 

SENIOR YEAR. 
Winter Term. — Elements of Criticism. 



VIII. School of Military Science and Tactics. 

PROFESSOR PIERCE. 

The studies in this School are the same as those in the Literary Depart- 
ment. They are enumerated on page 16. 



19 




I 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. I 





? 



WEST VJRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING. 




The studies in this Department, for the first, second and third years, 
are the same as in the general Scientific Course. For the Senior year 
they are in the 

School of Philosophy. 

PRESIDENT MARTIN. 

Fall Term. — Moral Science. Wayland's. 
5 Winter Term.— Political Philosophy — International Law. Woolsey. 

| Spring Term. — Sacred Philosophy— 'Butler's Analogy. 

I " " " " Nat. Theology and Ev. Christianity. 



School of Astronomy and Physics. 

PROFESSOR STEVENS. 

Fall Term.-— Comparative Physical Geography. 
Winter Term. — Descriptive and Physical Astronomy. 



I Spring Term. — Practical Astronomy. 



School of Mathematics and Engineering. 



\ PROFESSOR PIERCE. 

I Fall Term. — Civil Engineering — Mahan. 

Winter Term.— Military Engineering— Mahan. 
} Spring Term. — Gillespie on the Location, Construction and Improve- 

I ment of Roads and Railroads. 

I 

School of Chemistry and Natural History, 

PROFESSOR FONTAINE. 

Fall Term, — Geology — Lithological, Historical and Dynamical — Dana ; 
Geological Excursions. 

School of English Literature. 

ACTING PROFESSOR LYON 

Winter Term.— Elements of Criticism. 




20 

i ^i>«;<-ll-.;,->i-l.,-. J -. i <».:-...i-. J '1if.,....>i«-i* i )i >i ,, t »i,a»..,., J ,«. < .,.,,,..»,,,,.(,.Ji..<» t .J«k.'.,».| 





WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 




The studies of this Department are, at present embraced in a two years' 
course, and are pursued in six schools of the University. Students hav- 
ing creditably completed this course, will be entitled to receive a certifi- 
cate to that effect. 

School of Agriculture, Chemistry and Natural History. 

PROFESSOR FONTAINE. 

FIRST YEAR. 
First Term. — Inorganic Chemistry. 

Second Term. — Organic Chemistry; Zoology. ) 

Third Term. — Botany and Vegetable Physiology. I 

SECOND YEAR. ) 

First Term. — Analytical Chemistry; Geology. 
Second Term. — Analysis of Soils; Entomology. 
Third Term.— Allen's Farm Book. s 

S 



School of Astronomy and Physics. 



PROFESSOR STEVENS. 



PROFESSOR GLOVER. 




School of Mathematics and Engineering. 

PROFESSOR PIERCE. \ 

FIRST YEAR. J 

Third Term.— Plane Trigonometry. 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term. — Chain and Compass Surveying. 
Third Term. — Gillespie on Roads and Road-making. 
Students who have not previously studied Algebra will take it in addi- 3 
tion to the other studies of the first and second terms of the first year. [ 



i 

FIRST YEAR. 
First Term.- Physics of Solids and Fluids. { 

Third Term. — Heat, Magnetism and Electricity. 

SECOND YEAR. 
First Term. — Meteorology. } 



Second Term. — Astronomy. i 

School of History, Political Economy, and Belles Lettres. 



FIRST YEAR. J 

First Term. — General History. { 

Third Term. — Constitution of the United States and of West Virginia. 

SECOND YEAR. 
Third Term.-— American Political Economy. 

21 





WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



School of English Literature. 

ACTING PROFESSOR LYON 

First Year.— Second Term.... Hart's English Literature 

School of Philosophy. 

PRESIDENT MARTIN. 

Second Year.— Third Term.— Natural Theology. 




r 

The subjects for Lectures during the course, are the following: 

{ Fall Term.— 'The Chemistry, Structure and Physiology of Plants. 

} On the Water, Atmosphere and Soil as related to Vegetables. 

C On Tillage, Draining and Manuring. 

> Winter Term.— On Domestic Animals and their Digestion, Inspiration, 

( Assimilation and Excretion. 

} On the Composition, Preparation and Value of different kinds of 

i Food. 

\ On Milk, Butter, Cheese, Flesh and Wool as Agricultural Products. 

( Spring Term.— On Horticultural and Kitchen Gardening. 

[* On the Propagation, Training and Culture of Fruit Trees, the Vine, 

I Small Fruits and Vegetables. 

\ second 3t:e.a.:r,_ 

£ Fall Term.— On the staple grain, forage, root and fibre crops of this 
and adjoining States, and their varieties and the best soils 
C adapted for them. 

On the preparation of soil, seeding, cultivating, harvesting and 
C preparing for market. 

On the Origin and Natural History of Domestic Animals. 
| On Entomology and the Insects useful and hurtful to vegetation. 

) Winter Term.— On the raising, care, characteristics and adaptation of 

different breeds of Domestic Animals. 
I On Cattle for beef or draught, and Sheep for wool or mutton. 

On Horses, Swine and Poultry. 
} On Pasturing, Soiling and Stall Feeding. 

t On Tobacco, Hops and Forestry. 

\ Spring Term.— On Rural Economy. 

\ On the History of Agriculture, with sketches of the same in ancient 

\ and modern times and foreign lands. 

I On the Adaptation of Farming to soil, climate, market, and other 

i natural and economical conditions. 

On the different systems of Husbandry, such as stock, sheep, grain 
5 and mixed farming. 



22 






WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



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23 





WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



General Review of the 






Literary Department. 


Scientific Department. 






Algebra — finished. 


Universitv Algebra. 


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Universal History. 


Universal History. 


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Virgil — Bucolics and Georgics. 


French — commenced. 


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Herodotus. 


Chemistry — Inorganic. 


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Geometry — completed. 


Geometry — completed. 


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Manual of English Literature. 


Manual of English Literature. 


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Horace — Odes and Epodes. 


French — continued. 


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Homer— Iliad. 


Chemistry — Organic. 






Trigonometry. 


Trigonometry. 


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Constitution U. S. and W. Va. 


Constitution — V. S. and W. Va. 


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Cicero — De Senectute. 


French. • [tematic. 






Homer — Odyssey. 


Botany — Physiological and Sys- 






Mensuration and Surveying. 


Physics — Silliman's. 


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English Philology. 


Mensuration and Surveying. 


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Xenophon — Memorabilia. 


French. 


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Chemistry — Inorganic. 


Chemical Analysis. 


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Analytical Geometry. 


Physics — Acoustics and Optics. 


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Logic. 


Analytical Geometry. 





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Horace — Satires. 


Logic. 


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Chemistry — Organic. 


Chemical Analysis — continued. 


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Rhetoric. 


Physics — Heat and Electricity. 


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Livy. 


Analytical Geom. — completed. 


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Plato — Apology and Crito. 


Rhetoric. 




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Botany — Gray's. 


Manual of Agriculture. 






Mental Philosophy. 


Mental Philosophy. 




Physics — commuted . 
Calculus. *^ 


Meteorology. 


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Differential Calculus. 




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Euripides — Alcestis. 


German — commenced. 


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Mental Philosophy — completed. 


Mental Philosophy. 


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Physics — Acoustics and Optics. 


Analytical Mechanics. 


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Tacitus — Germaniaand Agricola. 


Integral Calculus. 


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Zoology. 


Zoology. 


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Physics; Heat; Electricity. 


Analytical Mechanics. 


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Political Economy. 


Political Economy. 




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Demosthenes — De Corona. 


German — continued. 




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Anatomy and Physiology. 


Human Anatomy. 






Moral Science. 


Moral Science. 




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History of Civilization. 


Physical Geography. 




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Cicero — De Officiis. 


Historv of Civilization. 


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Geology. 


Geology — Dana's. 


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Elements of Criticism. 


Elements of Criticism. 


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Astronomy. 


Astronomy— Descrip. and Phys. 


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International Law. 


International Law. 


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Sophocles — CEdipus Tyrannus. 


German— continued. 






Nat.Theol. and Ev. Christianity. 


Natural Theology. 


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Astronomy. 


Practical Astronomy. 




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Butler's Analogy. 


Butler's Analogy. 




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German — continued. 



24 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Courses of Study. 


Military Department. Agricultural Department. 


University Algebra. 

Universal History. 

French. 

School of the Soldier. 


Algebra — (Elemental 
History. 
Chemistry. 
Physics. 


Solid Geometry. 

English Literature. 

French. 

School of the Company. * 


Algebra. 

English Literature. 

Chemistry. 

Natural History of Animals. 


Trigonometry. 

Constitution — United States. 

French. 

Bayonet Exercises. 


Trigonometry. 

Constitution U. S. and W. Va. 

Physics. 

stable Physiology. 


Physics. 

Mensuration and Surveying. 

French. 

School of the Battalion. 




Physics. 

Analytical Geometry. 
Industrial Drawing. 
Sabre Drill. 




Topographical Surveying. 
Analytical Geometry. 
Manual of Signals. 
Artillery Practice. 




German. 

Mental Philosophy. 
Differential Calculus. 
Infantry Tactics and Practice. 




Mental Philosophy. 
Analytical Mechanics. 
Integral Calculus. 
Artillery Tactics. 


Analytical Mechanics. 
Political Economy. 
German. 
Artillery Practice. 




Moral Science. Surveying. 
Physical Geography. Meteorology. 
History of Civilization. Chemical Analysis. 
Field Fortifications. Geology. 


Astronomy. 
International Law. 
Military Law. 
Ordnance and Gunnery. 


Astronomy. 
Entomology. 
Chemical Analysis. 
Lectures. 


Natural Theology. 
Practical Astronomy. 
Military Telegraphy. 
Advanced Guard, Outpost, &c. 


Natural Theology. 
Political Economy. 
Allen's Farm Book. 
Roads and Road-making. 



25 




WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 




PIEST YEAR. 

Fall Term. — Geography — Guyot's Common School ; Map Drawing. 
Arithmetic — Stoddard's Complete. 

English Grammar — Etymology. { 

Latin — commenced. \ 

Winter Term. — Geography — Guyot continued ; Map Drawing. 

Arithmetic continued. 2 

Eng. Grammar — Syntax. i 

Latin — Grammar and Reader. ) 

Spring Term. — Arithmetic — Complete. : 

English Grammar — Analysis of Sentences. • 

Latin — Grammar and Reader. \ 

Greek — Bullions' First Lessons. ) 

siecohstid irzEL^ie,. X 

Fall Term. — Algebra — Robinson's New University, to Involution. ; 
Book-keeping. \ 

Caesar — Latin Grammar. ) 

Greek Grammar and Reader. ? 

Winter Term. — Algebra — Robinson's, to Quadratics. \ 

History of the United States — Wilson's. S 

Cicero's Orations — Bullions'; Latin Grammar. \ 

Greek Grammar and Reader. \ 

Spring Term. — Geometry— Robinson's First Five Books. 
History of the United States, completed. 
Virgil — Three Books of JEneid ; Latin Grammar. 
Xenophon's Anabasis; Greek Grammar. 
Regular lessons in Writing, Spelling, Elocution and English Composi- 
tion from the beginning. 

The course preparatory to the Scientific, the Engineering and the Mil- 
itary Departments is the same as the above with the omission of the 
studies in Greek. 
The studies preparatory to the Agricultural Department, are as follows: 
Fall Term. — Algebra; Arithmetic; Grammar; Geography. 
Winter Term. — Algebra; Arithmetic; Grammar; History U. S. 
Spring Term. — Geometry; Arithmetic; Grammar; History. 



26 








WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 












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27 




WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 





Origin of the University. 

I The subject of advanced education has been in various forms before the 

( people of West Virginia for years, but without any liberal provision having 

i been made for the same until quite recently. The Constitution of the State 

i makes it the duty of the Legislature to " foster and encourage Moral, Intellectual, 

l Scientific and Agricultural Improvement ; and to make provision for the organization 

\ of such institutions of learning as the best interests of general education may de- 

} mand" The National Congress having donated certain lands "in order to 

} promote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the 

i several pursuits and professions in life," the Legislature accepted the same, and 

( appointed a Board to organize the Institution, with instructions to u establish 

} Departments of Education in Literature, Science, Art, Agriculture, and Military 

h Tactics — including a Preparatory Department^ 



Endowment and Funds. 

The proceeds of the sale of Congressional lands amounted to $80,000. The 
citizens of Morgantown contributed in grounds, buildings and money, about 
$50,000. The Legislature, realizing the necessity and immense value of such 
an institution; its incalculable worth to the youth of the Commonwealth and 
of the country, has increased the endowment to about $110,000, with annual 
appropriations for current and contingent expenses. As no part of the Con- 
gressional grant can be applied to the erection of buildings, (one tenth only 
being allowed for the purchase of an experimental farm,) the Legislature has 
also made provision for the supply and keeping in order of such buildings as 
the growth of the Institution may, from time to time, demand. 



28 






WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Name and Government. 




( At the beginning, in common with some other National Schools, it was 



; simply called the "Agricultural College." Having been, however, fully \ 

; adopted by the State, and the means supplied to aid in its establishment being ) 

\ supplemented by the Legislature, an act was passed, pursuant to the recom- ? 

( mendation of the Governor, ordering that it should thereafter be known bv C 

( the style and designation of "West Virginia University." It is under ( 

: the immediate oversight of a board of nine Regents, one from each judicial :' 

i circuit, appointed by the State and required to report to the Legislature. The } 

( bitterness of partizan and sectarian disputes is carefully excluded from its \ 
Halls, and a broad and manly culture thus secured to all. 

Scope. 

This is entirely in accord with the original design of the Institution as 
seen in the first paragraph of these "general remarks." The act of Congress 
contemplated the founding of Institutions that would furnish not only "prac- 
tical" but also "liberal education" — education "in the several pursuits," and 
just as certainly "in the several professions of life. The act of the Legislature 
contemplated a school of general instruction, and directed the Board to organ- 
ize several distinct Departments, as above enumerated, in the interest of the 
people of the State and the Nation. 

We trust that in the extent and in the quality of the work, and the thorough- 
ness of its discipline and culture, as well as adaptation to the demands of the 
age, the University will prove itself deserving of no second rate position 
among the Institutions of our land. It designs by its instruction in Literature 
and Art — in Language, ancient and modern — in Mathematics, pure and ap- 
plied — in the Sciences, agricultural, physical, mental, moral and social — by 
its recitations, lectures, examinations and elevating influences to educate, in- 
form and discipline the student's mind; to strengthen his moral principles, 
and supply such general and generous as well as special culture as will best 
prepare him for success and usefulness in any pursuit or profession in life. 

Dejjartments of Instruction. 

I. Literary. This embraces a comprehensive and thorough course of 
general study in nine schools, and is equal to that of our best American col- 
leges. It aims at the complete and harmonious development of all the pow- 

29 




WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 




i ers of the mind, and provides instruction in all the leading subjects of human 

-f thought. The student who successfully accomplishes its curriculum is en- i 

} titled to the Degree of " Bachelor of Arts." For those who have time, means, ( 

h and ability, it undoubtedly secures the highest culture which our best Insti- \ 

{ tutions supply to undergraduates. ') 

t II. Scientific. This is for those whose special tastes or necessities incline \ 

• ... \ 

} them to scientific study. It omits the ancient classics except as much of { 

) the Latin as is embraced in the Preparatory department, and includes the \ 

S French and German Languages. It embraces studies in eight schools and | 

t entitles to the Degree of "Bachelor of Science." In our State and country : 

I there is special demand for such instruction, and this Department is designed i 

I in extent and value to be second to none other of its kind. i 

J III. Agricultural. Studies relating to the theory and practice of Agri- } 

I culture constitute an important Department in the University. Young men 5 

I who desire to study only such branches as will enable the Farmer to pursue \ 

} his calling with intelligence and profit will here find, at small expense of time • 

\ or means, all they need in the way of a sound, practical education. They are \ 

i not required to study any language but their own, nor to go in mathematics '} 

( farther than land surveying. With a good free school education they will be ) 

) able to accomplish this course in two years. Those deficient in elementary \ 

) studies must spend at least one year in Preparatory studies before entering I 

% this department. ) 

\ IV. Military. The law provides that four cadets may be appointed for } 

£ each Judicial circuit in the State. These are educated free of cost for tuition, \ 

books, stationery, &c. For such as desire a military and engineering education ( 

this department is provided. Cadets, however, are not limited to this, but may ) 

pursue their studies in any Department of the University, subject to the general \ 

regulations laid down in the Code for the Cadets. Other students are permit- \ 

ted to drill on condition that they provide themselves with the neat and be- • 

coming uniform of the Corps. Drill occupies one hour on each of four days ? 

in the week. The United States Government liberally furnishes the special "\ 

supplies required for this department. These are of the latest and most im- } 

proved construction. I 

V. Preparatory. But few of our young "men in West Virginia have I 

home advantages for properly and fully preparing themselves to enter upon ) 

regular College studies. It has proved a large source of supply for the higher : 



30 

i<l.<l l >>U><li<l><<ll>lt<<t>'U« l <l'l ll l«,M,i>u><<) l liM.i>< < )>t<<l.<>t>M>l<i>'< l l>i,><.>>..M.< 





WEST VIRGINIA [JNIVERSITY. 



\ classes, and also the means of maintaining an elevated grade of preliminary 
\ scholarship for admission to them. AjB the "ther schools of the State increase 

• in number and efficiency, in the same proportion will the nere-«ity of this 
% Department diminish. Meanwhile, and nntil their fuller development, it 
I cannot be dispensed with without lowering the standard of Collegiate Study 
I proper, or shutting out from the advantages of the Institution many of the 
} best and most promising young men of the State. Nowhere else can young 
: men be better prepared for advanced studies, or, if this is not contemplated, 
{ accomplish more thoroughly and advantageously such studies as are here 
{ provided. 

: \n Optional Course is allowed those students whose special tastes or 
5 necessities prevent them from graduating in any of the regular Departments. 

• Parents and guardians of students who expect to attend the University are, 
\ however, earnestly advised to direct their studies with a view to entering one 
: of those Departments. The attention of those who teach in our intermediate 
: schools is also respectfully invited to this suggestion. 

5 A Normal Class, for the special advantage of Teachers, is formed every 
( spring. In this the ordinary school studies are carefully reviewed, exactness 
: and readiness in explanation and definition acquired, and instruction in the 
} most approved methods of organizing and conducting schools imparted. 
There is also a weekly Lecture before the class on some subject connected 
with teaching. 

The Trustees of the " Peabody Educational Fund," through their general 
agent, Dr. Barnas Sears, have placed at the disposal of the University, the 
sum of five hundred dollars, annually to be given to such young men of the 
Normal Department as need assistance to qualify themselves for higher use- 
fulness as teachers in West Virginia, or any other State entitled to the advan- 
tages of the Peabody Fund. 




31 





WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 




Requisites for Admission. 

I. All candidates for admission to any Department of the University, must 
present satisfactory evidence of good moral character. 

II. Students coming from other Colleges must produce certificates of hon- 
orable dismision from the same. 

III. Those entering as Students for a Degree in any Department of the 
University, must sustain an examination in the various studies of the Pre- 
paratory School of the University, or their equivalent. 

IV. Candidates for advanced standing must sustain an examination in the 
previous studies of the Department which they desire to enter. 

V. The regular examination for admission of candidates, who have not 
pursued the preliminary studies in the Preparatory School of the University, 
will take place on Friday, [June 20th,] succeeding Commencement, and on 
Tuesday, [September 2nd,] preceding the opening of the Fall term. 

VI. Candidates should procure a copy of the printed laws of the Univer- 
sity, also the Treasurer's receipt for tuition, before presenting themselves for 
enrollment. 

VII. Applicants for admission to the Preparatory Department must stand 
an approved examination before the Faculty or a committee of the Faculty, 
on spelling, reading, writing, modern geography, elements of English gram- 
mar, and arithmetic through common fractions. 




32 





WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 




Examinations. 

I. Each student at the close of the Term shall stand a public written ex- 
amination upon all the studies which he has pursued during that term. No 
student shall be excused for non-attendance on such examinations, except 
upon presentation of a reason which may be considered valid by the Faculty. 
No student who may be absent, and not thus excused, shall be allowed to 
continue in connection with the University. If at the close of any term a 
student shall have failed to attain a standing of 6, owing to a failure in exam- 
ination, he shall be informed of the fact, and he may be allowed to stand a 
special examination under the same committee at any time before the begin- 
ning of the next College year. 

II. The examination of each class shall be conducted by a committee com- 
posed of three members of the Faculty, who shall, within the three days next 
preceding the examination, select a series of questions not less than nine nor 
more than fifteen in number, and submit the same in writing to the class at 
the time of examination. 



III. After the examination the committee shall examine the papers and 
determine the standing made by each student in examination, which shall be 
considered the equivalent of one month's standing in recitation. 



IV. Before a student shall be entitled to enter a higher class he shall have 
attained a minimum standing of 6 in each study belonging to his class, which 
shall be determined by the average of his recitations and examinations. 




33 




WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 




Calendar. 

The annual session of thirty-nine weeks is divided into three terms of 
thirteen weeks each. An interval of a few days occurs between the Fall and 
Winter and between the Winter and Spring terms. Also a recess of about 
two weeks including the Christmas holidays. It is highly important that 
students be present at the first recitation of their classes. The exercises begin 
promptly on the day designated, and any time lost affects the standing of the 
student, and perhaps embarrasses his whole course. 

Tee annual Commencement Exercises are held on the third Thursday of 
June. The Fall Term begins on the first Wednesday of September. 
1873. June 12th, Thursday, 9 A. M. Annual Examination begins. 

13th, Friday, 7* P. M. Anniversary of Parthenon Society 

14th, Saturday, 7 J P. M. Anniversary Y. M. C. Association 
loth, Sunday, 3 P. M. Baccalaureate Sermon by the Presi- 
dent. 
16th, Monday, 7£ P. M. Anniversary of the Columbian Lit- 
erary Society. 
17th, Tuesday, 7£ P. M. Regents' Prize Contest. 
18th, Wednesday, U P. M. Address before the Lit'ry Societies. 
19th, Thursday, 9 A. M. Commencement Day. 
Sept. 2d, Tuesday, 9 A. M. Examination of Candidates for Ad- 

mission. 
3d, Wednesday, 9 A. M. Regular Work of the University 
Year 1873-74 begins. 
Nov. 25th, Thursday. Fall Term ends. 
Dec. 3d, Wednesday. Winter Term begins. 

24th, Wednesday. Christmas Recess begins. 
1874. Jan. 7th, Wednesday. Winter Term resumed. 
March 12th, Thursday. Brown Prize Contest. 
" ( 12th > " Winter Term ends. 

18th, Wednesday. Spring Term begins. 
April 24th, Friday. Junior Exhibition. 

June 18th, Thursday. Spring Term ends. Commencement. 

Expenses. 

Preparatory Department, $5.00 per Term of 13 weeks 

Other Departments, g.00 « .« « ,« 

Students in the Preparatory Department pay one dollar; in the other De- 
partments two dollars per term contingent fee. 

Four Cadets may be appointed by each Regent, free of charge for tuition 
books, and stationery. Boarding varies from $3.00 to $4.00 per week. 



34 






WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 




Prizi s. 

I. The Regents' Prizes. — To the Student who shall write the bed 
upon a given subject, $2$. To the Student who shall be adjudged the 
Declairner, S15. These prizes to be awarded after public competition, by a 
committee of citizens appointed by the Faculty. 

These were awarded at the last contest as follows, viz: 

M. L. Temple, Esay, S25.00 

Harry Mi. ire, Declamation 15.00 

II. The Brown Brizes. — The annual sum of one hundred dollars has 
been placed in the President's hands by Gen. G. W. Brown, of Grafton, for 
the encouragement of the Literary Societies, to be awarded for superiority in 
Essay, Oration, Declamation, and Debate. 

These were awarded at the last contest as follows, viz: 

Thomas Perry Jacobs, Debate, S40.00 

John Samuel Willetts, Oration, 30.00 

Charles Wesley Lynch, ) 

„ \ Essay, 20.00 

Welliam Moses Howell, ) 

Ashbel Fairchild Downs, Declamation, 10.00 

Discipline. 

The rules of the University require that every student shall be in his place 
at all stated exercises from the opening to the close of his connection with 
the University. A record is kept in which are entered the grade of Scholar- 
ship of each Student, his absence from the exercises of the Institution, his 
tardiness, or failure in recitation, unless satisfactorily accounted for. An ab- 
stract of this record is sent at the close of each Term in the Preparatory 
Department, and at the end of the College year in the other Departments, to 
parents or guardians, so that they may see what and how their sons and wards 
are studying, and how they stand in scholarship and deportment. In case of 
negligence, irregularity, or other misconduct, the Student will be privately 
admonished and the parent or guardian will be informed of the fact. Mere 
inattention to study will, if persisted in, insure dismission from the Univer- 
sity. No Student is allowed to leave the town during Term time without 
special permission. 

Students from abroad, under fifteen years, should have their money sent to, ) 
and their bills settled by, Prof. S.G.Stevens, Registrar of the University. 



35 






WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 




Religious Instruction and Worship. 

The exercises of each day are opened with reading the Scriptures, singing 
and prayer, at which all the Students are required to be present. They are 
also required to attend regularly some place of religious worship on the Sab- 
bath, and on all occasions to treat the institutions of religion with respect. 
The Institution is, and from the beginning has been, free from Sectarian con- 
trol or domination. 

A Young Mens' Christian Association 

is maintained by voluntary action of the Students, without interference from, 
or dictation by, the Faculty, or any member of it. This has been in many 
ways of great advantage to its members and to the Institution generally. 

Library. 

A respectable beginning towards a University Library has already been 
made. About four thousand volumes have been carefully selected and placed 
on its shelves, including not only many choice and valuable books of reference, 
but also standard works in the various departments of History, Biography, 
Theology, Agriculture, Art, Science and General Literature. 

We respecfully request the friends of Education to make contributions to 
its shelves. Very valuable donations have been received during the past 
year, of which the following are the principal: 

Geology of New Jersey, 1 volume; by Prof. Cook, State Geologist. 
" "of Iowa, 2 vols.; Governor Carpenter. 
" of Ohio, 1 vol.; State Geologist. 
k " of Indiana, 1 vol.; Prof. Cox, State Geologist. 

I " of Connecticut, 1 vol.; Secretary of State of Connecticut. 

\ Documentary History of Maine, 1 vol.; State Librarian of Maine. 
I Exploration of Colorado River — Ives — 2 vols.; Capt. Pierce. 
i American Commercial Law, 1 vol.; Capt. Pierce. 

£ Transactions of N. Y. State Agricultural Society, 11 vols.; Gov. of N. Y. 
i Ohio Agricultural Reports, 7 vols.; Governor of Ohio. 
) Massachusetts Labor Statistics, 1 vol.; Governor of Massachusetts. 
i Agricultural Reports, 6 vols.; Governor of Massachusetts. 

? " Health Report, 1 vol. ; " " 

: " Report of State Charities, 2 vols.; " " 

) " Life, Fire and Marine Ins., 3 vols.; Gov. of Mass. 

{ " on Railroads, 1 vol.; Gov. of Massachusetts. 

} " " on Education, 4 vols.; " " 

Geology of Maine, 21 vols. ; Governor of Maine. 

36 






WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 




Speeches on Financial Questions, Ac, 1 vol.; Industrial Publishers, Phila. 

Slave Trade, 1vol.; 

Speeches on the Tariff, &c, 1 vol. ; " " " 

Protection to Native Industry, 1 vol. ; " " " 

Questions of the Day. 1 vol. ; " " " 

Carey's Historical Works, 1vol.; '.' 

Social Science — Carey — 1 vol.; " " u 

Unity of Law— Carey— 1vol.; " " " 

Dicks' Works, complete, 5 vols.; John E. Day, Wheeling. 

Preliminary Report of Explorations in Nevada — Wheeler — 1 vol.; Gen'l 
Humphreys, U. S. Engineers. 

Geological Explorations of 40ih Parallel — King — 1 vol. ; Gen. Humphrey's, 
U. S. Engineers. 

Travels in East Ind. Archipelago, 1 vol.; Rev. W. M. Mullen ix. 

Census 1870, — Public Documents, &c, 40 vols. ; Members of Congress. 

Travels in Delmatia, by Alberto Fortis; Hon. Mrs. W. G. Brown. 

There have been purchased during the year, fifty volumes of standard 
works, including a most valuable and complete copy of the Natural History 
of New York. 

Copies of the Daily Wheeling Intelligencer, Daily Charleston Courier, and 

Tri- Weekly Wheeling Register, and of nearly all the weekly journals in the 

State, as well as several from other States, have been cheerfully donated to 

j the Reading Room of the University. We trust these are but the beginnings 

{ of larger gifts. 
I 

} Museum, Apparatus, Sfc. 

/ The University is in possession of apparatus requisite for thorough illus- 

) tration of Chemistry and Physics. 

I Several valuable articles of apparatus have been obtained for the depart- 

i ment of Astronomy and Physics, including a Smithsonian Barometer, by 

/ Greene, of New York ; a Sextant, bv Crichton, of London, and a Clock, with 

i 

) Zinc Compensation, by E. Howard & Co., of Boston. A 7 ft. Telescope has 

} been constructed by John Byrne, of New York. It is equatorially mounted 

\ with right ascension and declination circles, and is a first-class instrument in 

{ every respect. 



) The Museum contains extensive Mineralogical, Geological and Concholog- 
; ical cabinets, together with many specimens in other departments of Natural 
\ History. We request all who are interested in such matters to send suitable 
specimens for the Museum, especially Indian relics, shells, minerals, fossils 

37 






WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 




and alcoholic specimens of animals. Such donations will be acknowledged 
and carefully labeled with the name of the donor. There are already over 
2000 specimens of minerals and fossils, and more than 2,300 of recent shells. 

The vicinity of the University offers unrivalled advantages for the study of 
practical Geology. Especial attention will be paid to this branch. 

The laboratory of Practical Chemistry is in operation. The instruction for 
the present is devoted chiefly to analysis, with its application to agriculture. 

Donations have been received during the year, as follows: 

Specimen of Teredo Navalis, by Col. T. B. Swann, Charleston, W. Va. 

Shark's Tooth, by J. T. Waters, of New York. 

Specimens of Continental Money, also of Limestone and Stalactites from Jeffer- 
son county, W. Va., by D. W. Border, Frederick City, Md. 

Specimens of Baryta, by Wm. M. Bowers, Jefferson county, W. Va. 

Bear's Tooth, by Elgis Davis. 

Specimens of Stalactites and Gypsum, from Mammoth Cave, by Rev. S. R. 
Davis, Wheeling. 

Specimens of Manganese and Ochre, by Dr. I. N. Clark. 

Specimen of Iron Concretion with fluid, by Dr. Dent. 

Miocene Coral, by Thomas H. Price, Monongalia county, W. Va. 

Fossils, by G. M. Hagans, Morgantown. 

Parchment Bonds with Autographs of Governors of Virginia from 1780 to 1815 
by Miss C. Evans, Morgantown. 

Fossils, from Kanawha, by Miss Sally A. Evans, Charleston. 

One Boomerang, from Australia; One Wooden Carved Vessel; Two Pieces of 
Tappa Cloth from the Feejee Islands; Three Arrows from the Solomon 
Islands; Specimens of Quartz Crystals and Quartz Schist, by Lieutenant 
Moore, United States Navy. 

Copper Medal, by I. A. Childs. 

Ores and Fossils, by Cephas Jacobs, Morgantown. 

One Old Document by F. Heermans, Kingwood, W. Va. 

Moose Horns, from Montana, by Dr. Jos. A. McLane, Morgantown. 

Elk Horns, from Montana, by J. R. Donehoo, Morgantown. 

United States Signal Station. 

By direction of General Myer, Chief Signal Officer of the Army, a signal 
station has been established at the University for the benefit of Commerce, 
Agriculture, and Science. It is, at present, in charge of Sergeant Thomas R 
Watson, S. S. U. S. Army. Students are by this means furnished with special 
advantages for the study of Meteorology and related subjects. The frequent 
and carefully recorded observations taken by means of the most improved instru- 
ments will furnish accurate and reliable data for, hereafter, estimating 




38 





WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 




climatic changes in West Virginia. By this means also the newspapers, 
Eoards of Trade, and River men generally, at Pittsburgh, Wheeling and 
Cincinnati, if they so desire, can be reliably advised of special movements in 
the river at the head of navigation. 

• Literary Societies. 

There are two of these in connection with the University, furnished with 
suitable halls, tastefully furnished, and whose exercises in Composition, Read- 
ing, Orations, Debate and Criticism are, in manv respects, of great advantage 
to the student. They also afford facilities for the study of, and acquaintance 
with Parliamentary forms, and the acquisition of business habits. The au- 
thorities of the University will afford every facility for increasing the 
accommodations and usefulness of these variable auxiliaries. 

Location . 

Morgantown, the seat of the University, is beautifully located on the right 
bank of the Monongahela river, Monongalia County, West Virginia. The 
scenery around is exceedingly attractive and picturesque. The place has 
long been famous for its social, intellectual, and moral culture, and general 
healthfulness. Coaches leave every morning to and from Fairmont, on the 
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. There is also a daily conveyance between 
Morgantown and Uniontown, Pa. Steamboats from Pittsburgh arrive every 
day at Geneva, twelve miles below ^Morgantown, and at Morgantown twice 
each week. Congress has made liberal appropriations for the continuance of 
slackwater navigation in the Monongahela as far as Morgantown. A place 
more eligible for the quiet and successful pursuit of Science and Literature is 
nowhere to be found. 

University Buildings. 

These are models of Architectural beauty, capacity, solidity, and convenient 
arrangement. The Armory will be ready for occupancy by the end of the 
College year. The new Hall, for which a liberal appropriation was made at 
the last session of the Legislature, will be put under contract as soon as pos- 
sible. Grateful for the past, its friends are encouraged to expect a bright 
future for the Universitv. 



39 





CATALOGUE 



OF 



West Virginia University 



1873-74. 



CHARLESTON : 

John W. Gentry, Printer. 
L874. 



WKST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



BOARD OF REGENTS. 



No. of Circuit. Name of Regent. P. 0. Address. 

1 GEO. W. FRANZHEIM, Wheeling. 

2 : L. S. HOUGH, Morgantown. 

3 CHAS. J. FAULKNER. Martinsburg. 

4 H. S. CAEE Moorefield, 

5 1). J). JOHNSON, Long Beach. 

G F. M. CHALFANT Weston. 

7 H. S. WALKER Charleston 

8 A. F. MATHEWS Leicisburg. 

9 ISAIAH BEE ; Princeton. 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 



D. D. JOHNSON, President. 
A. W. LOEEXTZ. Treasurer. 
GEORGE C. STURGISS, Secretary. 



Executive Committee. 



L. S. HOUGH, Chairman. 
JOHN A. DILLE. 
JESSE .1. FITCH. 
DAVID H. CHADWICK. 
JAMES EVANS. 

GEO. C STURCISS, Secretary. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



FACULTY AND TEACHERS, 



Rev. ALEX. MARTIN. D. P., 

i 

President. 



Rev. J. W. SCOTT. I). D.. LL. D., Vice-President. 

Prof, of Mental and Moral Science and English Literature. 

S. <;. STEVENS, A. M., 

Prof 8303 oi Astronomy and Physics. 

H. II. PIERCE, Bvt. Capt. U.S. A.. Librarian. 

Professor of Mathematics and Military Science. 

F. W. WOOD. A. M., Ph. D. ? 

Professor of Modern Languages and Literature. 

GEO. X. GLOVER, A.M.. Secretary, 

Prof. of Eistory, Political Economy and BeUes Lettres. 

W.M. M. FONTAINE, A. M.. 

Prof, of Agri olture, Chemistry and Natural 1L 



4 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

F. S. LYON. A. M. 3 

Prof, of Normal Instruction and Principal of Preparatory Department. 

EOBT. C. BEKKELEY, A. M., 

Prof, of Ancient Languages and Literature. 

BENJ. W. SMITH. A. B., 

Assistant in Preparatory Department. 

I). B. PUIUNTOX. A. B., 

Assistant in Preparatory Department. 

E. SHISLER, Esq., 

Superintendent of Grounds and Buildings 

HUGH W. BROCK, M. D., 

lecturer on Physiology and Hygiene. 

Hon. JOHN A. DILLE ; A. M.. 

Lecturer on Civil and Constitutional Law. 



Serg't L. DUNNE, Sig. Serv. ? U. 8. A. 

Meteorological Observer aid Instructor in Signalizing and Telegraphy. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



STUDENTS. 
Seniors. 

( Ihadwick, Richard Vincent Lit Morgantown. 

Dean, John Shreve William Lit Buekhannon, Upshur Comity. 

Howell. William Moses Lit Morgantown % 

Jacobs. Thomas Perry Lit ' ; 

Lynch, Charles Wesley Lit Brown's ('reek, Harrison Co. 

Bforan, Ellsworth Klza Lit Forkshurg. Marion Co. 

Woods. Frank Lit Phillippi, Barbour Co. 

Juniors. 

Adams, Samuel Shugert hit... Washington City. D. C 

Doliver, Robert H Lit. .. Morgan town. 

Doliver, Jonathan Prentiss Lit... - 

.Martin, James Yirginius Lit... M 

MeCrum, Lloyd Sei... German Settlement, Preston Co. 

Peterson. James Jackson hit... Weston, Lewis Co. 

Purin ton, Aaron Lyon L,\i... Morgantown. 

Sophomores* 

Anderson, John C 0\)t... Easton. Monongalia Co. 

Bowers, William Melancthon Sei... Summit Point, Jefferson Co. 

Carskadon, James Thornton 8ci. ..Headsv 'die, Mineral Co. 

Dawson. 11. William 0\)t. Bealinillc, Washington Co., Pa. 



b' WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

Sophomores— Continued. 

Dils. George 0\)t.. Parkersburg. 

*Frasher, Luke H Lit. ..Tippecanoe, Fayette. Co.. Pa. 

Hubbard, Harry Dana Opt. . Wheeling. 

*Ison, WilleyOwens Lit .. Parker sburg, Wood County. 

Kemp. Howard Mason 0\>t.. Bloomington, Md. 

Laidlev, George Summers Int.. .Charleston, Kanawha Co. 

*Xash, James Henry Sci... Buffalo, Putnam Co. 

Payne, Jed Goff Lit. . Bridgeport, Harrison to. 

Payne. Waldo W Lit... « 

Swann, Ferdinand B Opt. .Pari*, Texas. 

♦Wetzel, Daniel Elliott Int... Burning Spring, Wirt Co. 

Wiley, Rankin Jr Opt. Hartford City. Mason, Co. 

*Wilson, Edgar Wood Int... Morgantown. 

Willetts, John S Int... Wheeling. 



Freshmen- 

Arnett, James E Opt... Arnettsville. Monongalia Co. 

Boyers, James S Opt... Randall, i: " 

Brown . Eobert L Opt . . .Morgantown. 

Brown, William (fay Lit... Kingwood, Preston Co. 

Bullock. Talbot Sei... Parkersbwrg. 

Burr. Claudius Opt . . .French Creek, Upsh ur Co. 

Cox. James A Opt... Arnettsville, Monongalia Co. 

Crisswell, Everett H Opt... Moundsville. 

Dille, Clarence B Lit... Morgantown. 



WEST VIRGINIA I DIVERSITY. . 

Freshmen— Continued. 

Hskey, Leonard Sci... Sherrard, Marshall Co. 

Fleming, Julian E2 Lit... Morgantown. 

Hall. Samuel .1 Opt... Laurel Point, Monongalia Co, 

Harris. Perry B Opt. . .Moundsville. 

♦Hawthorn, Joseph 1[ Lit... 'Randall, Monongalia Co. 

Hickman, Jeremiah W O'pt... Pursley Tyler Co. 

Hood. Thomas M Lit... Arnettsville, Monongalia Co. 

♦Jacobs, William L Lit... Morgantown. 

Long, Daniel M. L LiV.. ML Morris, Greene Co., Venn. 

Martin. John Erian Sci... Morgantowni 

Pell, John R Lit... Burning Springs, Wirt Co. 

Pitrat, William A Opt.. .Buffalo, Putnam Co. 

Ramage, Thomas C Opt... West Milford, Harrison Co. 

Rich, Daniel Lit... Laurel Point, Monongalia Co. 

Rogers, Daniel Lit . . . Morgantown . 

Slack. Edward B Opt... Charleston, Kanawha Co. 

Steele. John L Lit... Grafton. 

Stewart James M Opt... Stewartoicn, Monongalia Co. 

Stewart. James S Opt... McCoy's Station. Jeff. Co., Ohio. 

Yamlervort. James W Lit... Chicago, Illinois. 

Wetzel. John F. H Opt... Burning Springs, Wirt Co. 

*Wirgman, Henry T Lit... Homney, Hampshire Co. 

Woods John Hopkins Lit... Phillippi, Barbour Co. 

Grates, Thornton B Oyb... Grafton. 



Lit— Literary Cjumc. Sci. — Scientific Course. Opt.— Optional Course. ^Conditioned. 



Preparatory Department. 



FACULTY 



REV. ALEX. MARTIN, I). D., 

President. 

F. S. LYON, A. M., 

IV fi. of Normal Instruction and Principal of Preparatory Dep't. 

BENJAMIN W. SMITH, A. B.. 

Assistant in Preparatory Department. 

1). B. PURINTON,A.B., Sec't. 

Assistant in Preparatory Department. 



WEST VIRGINIA I MVKHS1TV. 



STUDENTS. 



SECOND YEAR. 

Brown, John Craig Buffalo, Putnam county. 

Chadwick, ]>avi<l Morgantown. 

Dayton, Alston Gordon Phillippi, Barbour county. 

Downs, Ashbel F. "New Geneva, Fayette county. Pa. 

Eastham, .!. Prank Poinl Pleasant, Mason county. 

Enlow James A. Oakland, Maryland. 

Fitch, Dorsey I' Morgantown. 

Glasscock, Jacob L Phillippi. Barbour county. 

{lagans, William L Morgantown. 

Klieves, Frank A*. Wheeling. 

Marsh, Enoch Jasper Morgantown. 

Martin, Charles Alexander Morgantown. 

Ogden, Jay Franklin Shinnston, Harrison county. 

Park, George Washington Ravenswood, Jackson county. 

Paugh, Isaiah C Oakland, .Maryland. 

Pifer, Felix C Buckhannon, Upshur county. 

Purinton, ( reorgc Dana Morgantown. 

Bavenscrafb, Walter S Frostburg, Maryland. 

Smith. Everett C Spencer, Roane county. 

Bnively, Ha rry .1 (J raft on. 

Tabler, George W M Martinsburg. 

Wade, Clark C Morgantown. 

Warden, "William Granville, Monongalia county. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



FIRST YEAR. 



Argabrite, John Riley Palestine, Greenbrier county. 

Baily, Sylvan us W. J ...Weston, Lewis county. 

Brooke, William H Oakland. Maryland. 

Chidester, Marshall Winfield Morgan's Glade, Preston county. 

Curry, Blackburn Benette Hamlin Lincoln, county. 

Cummings, Stephen Raccoon, P.O. Preston county. 

Demain, Edmund Rigdon Morgantown, 

Drabell, Meigs Jackson " 

Harden, Wm. Hoiston Wheeling. 

Harrison. George Norris Williamstown, Wood county. 

Hatfield. James Allen Ousley's (Jap. Cabell county. 

Hatfield, Joseph Marion •• •• " " 

Ilaymond. Frank Thompson Morgantown. 

Holly, Elisha Walter Hamlin, Lincoln county. 

Holly. Janus Avis " " ;; 

Hunt. John Wesley ...iron Dale. Preston county. 

Johnston. Walter McDaniel Union. Monroe county. 

Keck. Leonidas Virginiue Morgantown. 

Kennedy. Robert Wilson Grafton. 

Lee, James McMillen Holliday's Cove. Hancock county 

Marsh, Thomas Morgantown. 

Masters, John Dice Franklin. Pendleton county. 

McGary, William Bernard Weston. Lewis county. 

. IcXutt, Benjamin C Gauley Bridge, Fayette county. 

LcYiekar, Emery Alvin ..Morgantown. 

Menear, Andrew Allen Gladeville, Preston county. 

Protzman . Lowell Mason Morgan tow n . 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. II 

S"J U DENTS— Contiu ued. 

Ramage, Benjamin Wcsl Milford, Harrison county. 

Ramsey, Marion Cole Cassville, Monongalia county. 

Reed, Charles B Wheeling. 

I h >gers, George M o rgantow 1 1 . 

Sheets, Ezra Allen Morgautown. 

Sin-,!. Cleon Keyes Pruntytown, Taylor county 

:. Charles Henry Stewartown, Monogalia county. 

Smith, George M Berkeley Springs, Morgan county; 

b, George C Quincy, Illinois. 

Steele, Wilmott L Ousley's Gap, Cabell county. 

Stevens. Thoburn Morgantown. 

Tillson, Clarence II Deer Park, Maryland. 

Vance, Robert A Morgantown. 

Vandervort, Bruce 

Vandervort, Virgil 

Wade, Sp< neer 

Wagner, Florence R 

Warden, Reger A Granville, Monongalia county. 

Warman, Lindsay Laurel Iron Work-. ■• < : 

Wells, Nicholas W LongEeaeh, Tyler. 

William-. William 15. Sycamore Dale. Harrison county. 

Yantis, Arnold S Harper's Ferry. 

y eager George G Randall, Monongalia county. 



Normal Class. 



Bailey. Sylvanus W. .1 
Chidester, Marshal W. 
Curry, Blackburn B. 
Dolliver, Robert H. 
Dolliver, Janathan P. 
Eastham, Joseph F. 
Hatfield, Joseph M. 
Holley, Elisha W. 
Holly, James A. 
Hunt, John W. 
Klievis, Frank A. 
Lee, James McM. 
Marsh, Enosh J. 
Masters, John D. 
McXutt. Benjamin C. 
Menear, Andrew A. 
Paugh, Isaiah C. 
Protzman. Lowell M. 
Reed, Charles B. 
Simmons. Joseph I). 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 13 

NORMAL CLASS— Continued. 

Sisler Charles II. 

Smith, George M. 

Steele, Wilmotl L 

Vandervortj Bruce 

Vandervort, Virgil 

Williams. William B. 

This Class is conducted strictly as a Teachers Class. It is under 
the immediate direction oi the Professor of (formal [instruction assis- 
ted by other Professors and Teachers. 



Military Department. 

FACULTY. 

Key. A\A<:X. MARTIN, D. J).. 

President. 

Bvt. CAPTAIN II. II. PIERCE, V . S. Army 

' nKMAMUM. 



STAFF. 

Cadet JAMES J. PETERSON, Second Lientenanl and Adjutant. 

Cadet CHARLES W. LYNtJH First Licutonant and Ord. Officer 



COMMISSIONED OFFICERS. 

Cadet WM. M. HOWELL, Captain. 

Cadet JOHN S. W. DEAN, Firsi Lieutenant. 

CADET E. E. MORAIST, Second Lieutenant. 



ROSTER OF STATE CADETS. 



Cadet JAMES T. CARSKADON, First Sergeant. 

Second 

District. I Name. Enlisted. 



J 



I! 



III. 



IV 



VI 



VII. 



James T. Peterson Oct. 20, L870 

j JamesM.Lee Sept.20, L873 

j Frank- A. Klieves Oct. 5, Is;:; 

1 Charles 1). Reed Oct. 8, L873 

f B. B. Moran Nov. 30, L869 

Thomas M. Hood Dec. 30, :_ 

JayF.Ogden Sept. 5, L873 

[ John L. Steele Sept. 5, 187-J 

I .lame- W. Vandervorl Nov. 21, 1-:: 

George W. M . Tabler Dec. 13, 1 572 

George M. Smith Sept. 20, 1873 

[ William 31 Bowers Dec. L3, 1872 

I .lames T. Carskadon Oct. 20, 1870 

George W. Park Oct. Is. 1873 

John D. Masters Oct. 18, 1873 

Enoch J Marsh Oct. 18, L873 



f 



Willev (.) Ison Oct. 20, 1870 

Nicholas AT. Wells Jan. 1C. 187-J 

Harry. I. Snivelv Ian. 16, 1-71 

John's. W. Dean Ian. s. 1870 



! 
I 

I Alston G. Dayton Sept. 5, 1873 

j Felix C. Pifer Dec. 13, 1872 

William B. McGary Sept.."). 1873 

Charles W. Lvneh" Ian. 6, 1871 



James II. Sash Oct. Id. 1871 

GeorgeS. Laidley Sept. 5, 1873 

.Ins. Prank Basthara Sept. 5, 1873 

Everett C. Smith Sept. 5, 1873 



16 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

CADEES— Continued. 



VIII. 



IX. 



John R. Argabrite Sept. 5, 1873 

Walter M. Johnston Oct. 9, 1873 

William M. Howell Feb. 16, 1870 

[ Benjamin G r MeNut Oct. 18, 1873 

Blackburn B. Carry Sept. 5, 1873 

William L. Steele... Sept. 5, 1873 



*DISTINGriSIIEl> CADETS— 1873. 

Charles M. Babb, Literary. Military. 

Daniel W. Border, do 

Marcellus L. Temple. Literary. do 

James F. Brown, do do 

James T. Waters, do do 

John S. W. Dean, do do 

Wm. M. Howell, do do 

E. E. Moran Military. 

Charles W. Lynch Literary. do 

James J. Peterson, Literary. do 

James T. Carskadon do 

John S. Willetts, do 

Wm. M. Bowers do 

Felix C. Pifer Literary. do 

Willey O. Ison do do 

Geo. W. M. Tabler Literary. do 

J. W. Hickman do 

Leonard Eskey do. 

Thos. M. Hood. Literary. do 

*In accordance with Regulations established for the government of the corps, the above Cadets 
are reported as distinguished in the departments opposite their names, by reason of having attained 
a yearly average of 9-00 and upwards, on a scale of 10-00. 



WEST VIRGINIA I NIVERSITY. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Senior- 7 

Junior- 7 

Sophomores L8 

Freshmen 

$Tormal Students -1 

First Preparatory Students, 50 

Second Preparatory Students -•> 

TotaJ 138 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 



The instruction thus far provided for in the University, is princi 
pally embraced in five departments, or courses of study, viz : Literary 
Department, Scientific Department, Agricultural Department, Tfctili^ 
tary Department; and for those desiring to qualify themselves for 
regular admission to any of the former, a Preparatory Department. 

LITERARY DEPARTMENT. 



This Department, leading to the Degree of Artium Baccalaureus, 

embraces studies in nine schools, as follows: 

I. SCHOOL OF PHILOSOPHY AND ENGLISH LITERATURE. 

PROFESSOB SCOTT. 

In this School the instruction is given partly by the use of text 
hooks, and partly by lectures. The Literary Course includes six 
terms' in this School. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Winter Term — English Literature. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term— Mental Philosophy: The Intellect. 
Winter Term — Mental Philosophy: The Sensibilities 
and the Will. 



VIRGINIA 1X1 \ I | 

SENIOR Vi:.\i:. 



19 



Pall Term — Moral Philosophy. 

Winter Term — Political Philosophy: International Law 
— Woolsey. 

Spring Term Sacred Philosophy: Butler's Analogy. 

Natural Theolgy and 
Ev. ( Jhristianity. 

11. SCHOOL OF ASTRONOMY AND PHYSK 

PROFESSOR STEV ENS. 

This School furnishes studies in the Literar\' Course, extending 
through five terms. 

JUNIOB v::.\::. 

Fall Term -Physics: General Principles— Solids 

and Fluids. 
Winter Term — Physics: Pneumatics; Acoustics: Optics. 
Spring Term — Heat; Correlation ofForces; Electricity. 

SENIOR vear. 

Winter Term — Astronomy: Loomis'— XI] Chapters. 
Spring Term— Astronomy : completed. 

The various branches of Physics are illustrated by means of suitah o 
apparatus. In these and in Astronomy, the treatment in the 
book is supplemented by lectures, whenever it is required, in order t > 
represc u1 fairly the present state of scientific progress 

[II. SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS AND ENGINEERING. , 

PR0FKS80B PIEBCE. 

The studies in the Literary Department of this School extend throug i 
six terms. 

FRESHMAN 5TEAR. 

Fall Term- .Mathematics: olney's — University Algebra. 
Winter Term— Mathematics: olney's — Geometry, Solid. 
Spring Term Mathematics: Olney's— Spherical Geometry 
and Trigonometry. 



> WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Fall Term — Engineering: Mensuration. Surveying and 
Navigation. 

Winter Term — Mathematics : Analytical Geometry — ( >1 aey's. 
Spring Term — Mathematics : Differential Calculus — Olney's. 

junior year. 

Fall Term — Mathematics: Analytical Geometry^ (Optional.) 
Winter Term — Mathematics: Integral Oalcus : (Optional.) 
IV. SCHOOL OF MILITAKY SCIENCE AND TACTICS. 

PKOFESSOE PIERCE. 
FIRST YEAR. 

First Term — Infantry Tactics: School of the Soldier. 
Second Term — Infantry Tactics: School of the Company. 
Third Term — Infantry Tactics: Bayonet Exercises. 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term — Infantry Tactics: School of the Battalion. 

Second Term — Cavalry Tactics: Sabre Drill. 

Third Term — Target Practice: Artillery and Small Arms. 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Term — Infantry Tactics and Practice. 

Second Term — Artillery Tactics: Field Fortifications. 

Third Term— Target Practice: Heavy and Field Artillery. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term — Infantry Tactics: School of the Brigade. 

Second Term — Ordnance and Gunnery. 

Third Term — Advanced Guard and Outpost duty. 

Dress Parades, Reviews, Inspections and Guard Mouldings are held 
s often as is deemed expedient throughout the entire course. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

V.SCHO >LOF MODERN LANGUA ■ ES \M> LITERATURE. 

PROFESSOR "STOOD. 

.1 [tnior — French : Three Terms — Elective. 
Senior — < i« rman : 

[f the studcul selects the French or German instead of the LatS 
Greek, he shall he required to study them respectively throe i 
|fessiv( Terms. 

VI. SCHOOL OF HISTORY, POLITICAL ECONOMY, AND BEL 

LETTRES. 

PROFESSOR GLOVER. 
FRE8HM \N YEAR 

Fall Term — Universal History. 

Spring Term — Constitution of the (Jnitod States and of 
West Virginia. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Term — English Philology: March. 

Elocution: Elementary Sounds. 
Winter Term — Logic: Coppee. 

Elocution: Emphasis and Modulation. 
Spring Term— Rhetoric: Haven. 

Elocution: Emotional Expression, Action, 

and Gesture. 

junior year. 

Spring Term — Political Economy: Bowcn. 

senior year 

Fall Term — History of Civilization: Guizot. 
Winter Term — Elements of Criticism: Lord Kai 
Litcrarvand Elocutionary Drill throughout the Freshman year also 



\Y EST V I B GINI A C N 1 V E R S ! T Y . 
VII. SCHOOL OV CHEMISTKY AND NATUKAL HISTORY. 

PROFESSOR FONTAINE. 
FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Fall Term — Eliot and Stoker's Chemistry: (Inorganic.) 

Winter Term — Chemistry : (Organic.) 

Spring Term — Grays School and Field Book of Botany. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Fall Term — Chemical Analysis. 

Winter Term — *\gricultura] Chemistry; Analysis of Soils. &c. 

Spring Term — Manual of Agriculture. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Winter Term — Zoology. 

Spring Term — Hainan Anatomy and Physiology: Draper's. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term — Lithological, Dynamical and Historical Geology: 
Dana. 

VIII. SCHOOL OF GREEK LANGUAGE AX!) LITERATURE. 

PROFESSOR BERKELEY. 
FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Fall Term — Herodotus: Arnold's Greek Prose Composition. 
Winter Term — Homer's Iliad: Arnold (continued;) 

Greek Grammar. 
Spring Term — Homer's Iliad ; Arnold's Prose Comp. (completed.) 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Term — Xenophon's Memorabilia: Exercises in 

Greek ( Jomposition. 
Spring Term — Plato : Crito and Apology. 

JUNIOR YEAR, 

Fall Term — Euripides" Alcestis (Elective.) 

Spring Term — Demosthenes on the Crown. (Elective.) 



WEST VIRGINIA i M \ ERSH i . 

SENIOR V!;\l:. 

Winter Term — Sophocles- — (Edipua Tyrannus.[i Elcctn 
[nstead of the Latin and Greek of the Junior year, the student mti 
feed French, and for those of the Senior year, German ; such electi< 

being made al the begin niug of the year. 

IX. S(!!<»()L OK LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATI RE. 

PROFESSOR BERK II I \ , 
FRESHM \N YEAR. 

Fall Term — Virgil — Bucolics and Georgics; Arnold's 

Latin Prose Com]* 
Winter Term — Horace — Odes and Epodes. 
Spring Term — Cicero — De Senectute or Dc Amicitia. 

sophomore year. 

Winter Term — llorac* — Satires and Epistles; Exercises in 

Latin Comp. 
Spring Term— Livy — Lincoln's. Exercises in Latin Composite 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Winter Term —Tacitus — Germ ania and Agrieola ; Latin 
Composition continued, i Elective.) 

SENIOR l'EAR. 

Fall Term — Cicero — DeOfficiis; Writu-n Exercises on His- 
torical Subjects. ( Elective, i 
Spring Term — Tacitus — Annals. I Elective.) 



SCIENTIFIC DEPARTMENT. 



This Department, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science, em- 
braces studies in seven Schools, as follows: 
I. IX THE SCHOOL OF PHILOSOPHY AXD EXGLISII LITERATURE. 



PROFESSOE SCOTT. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Winter Term — English Literature. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term— Mental Philosophy: The Intellect. 
Winter Term — Mental Philosophy: The Sensibilities 
and the Will. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term — Moral Science: Wayland's. 

Winter Term — Political Philosophy: International Law 

— Woolsey. 
Spring Term — Sacred Philosophy: Butler's Analogy. 

•• Xat. Theology and Ev. Christianity. 

II. SCHOOL OF ASTiloXoMY AXD PHYSICS. 

PROFESSOE STEVENS. 
SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term — General Principles of Physics; Solids and Fluids. 
Second Term — Undulations; Acoustics; Optics; Problems. 
Third Term — Heat; Magnetic, Statical andDynamical Electricity 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 26 

JUNIOB 1 i: u:. 

First Term — Meteorology: Loomis'. 
Second Term — A oalytical Mechanics. 
Third Term— Analytical Mechanics. Completed. 

SENIOR YEAR 

First Term— Physical Geography. 
Second Term — Descriptive and Physical Astronomy. 
Third Term — Practical Astronomy, Calculation and Graphical 
Construction of Eclipses; Solution of Problems 
to be verified by the Nautical Almanac. 
To pursue successfully the studies of the first year of this School, 
itudents must have a fair acquaintance with Algebra, Geometry and 
Trigonometry, and in addition to these, before commencing Analytical 
Mechanics, some knowledge of Analytical Geometry and Calculus. 

III. IN THE SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS AND ENGINEERING. 

PROFESSOB PIERCE. 
FRESHMAN YEAR. 

First Term — Olney's University Algebra. 

Second Term — Olney's Geometry. 

Third Term — Olney's Spherical Geometry and Trigonometry. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First Term — Robinson's Mensuration, Surveying and 

Navigation. 
Second Term — olney's Analytical Geometry. 
Third Term — Differential Calculus. 
JUNIOR yi:ak. 
First Term — Analytical Geometry. 
Second Term — [ntegral Calculus. 

IV. school <»F MILITARY SCI ENCE AND TACTICS. 

professor pi erce. 

The studies iii this School are the same as those in the Lit< 
Department. They are enumerated on page 20. 



26 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

V. SCHOOL OF MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE. 



PROFESSOE WOOD. 

The languages regularly taught in this School are French and Ger- 
man, but private classes in Spanish and Italian will be formed, when 
required. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Fall Term — French: Fasquelle's French Course: Oral 

and Written Exercises. 
"Winter Term — French : Fasquelle. completed : Telemachus. 
Spring Term — French: Dumas'. Napoleon : and Nouvelle 

Grammaire Francaise, Par M. Noel et M. 

Chapsal. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Fall Term — French : Dumas' Napoleon completed; Con- 
versation and Composition. 

Fifth. Term (optional) "Le Misanthrope" (A Comedy) By Moliere 
Noels and Chapsal's advanced Grammar. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term — German: Comfort's German Course ; Oral and 

Written 'Exercises. 
Winter Term — German ; Comfort's Course (completed.) 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Winter Term — German ; Comfort's Eeader; Conversation. 
Spring Term — German ; Schilleir's Mary Stuart and William 
Tell : Conversations. 

Fifth Term (optional) Whitneys Grammar: Goethe's Egmont ; 
Composition : Conversation. Adlers German Dictionary is recom- 
mended. 

Spier's and Surenne's French Dictionary is recommended. 

The Optional Term, in both French and German, may be taken by 
the Student, provided that it do not interfere with the regular course, 
and that it be ranked as an extra stud v. 



WEST VIBOINIA UNIVERSITY. 1~ 

VI. school OF HISTORY, POLITICAL ECONOMY AND BELLES 

LETTERS. 

PROFESSOR QLOV BR. 
FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Term — Universal History. 

Spring Term — Constitution of the United States and of West 
Virginia. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Winter Term — Logic: Coppee. 
Spring Term — Rhetoric. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Spring Term — Political Economy: Bowen. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term — History of Civilization : Guizot. 
Winteb Term — Elements of ( Jriticism. 

Literary and Elocutionary Drill throughout the Freshman and 
Sophomore years. 

VII. SCHOOL OF CHEMISTRY AND NATURAL HISTORY. 

PROFESSOR FONTAINK. 
FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Term — Eliot and Storer's Chemistry: (Inorganic.) 

Winter Term — Chemistry: (Organic.) 

Spring Term — Gray's School and Field Book of Botany. 

sophomore year. 
Fall Term — Chemical Analysis. 

Winteb Term — Agricultural Chemistry: Analysis of Soils, &c. 
Sprng Term — Manual of Agriculture. 

JUNIOR year. 
Winter Term — Zoology. 
Spring Term — Human Anatomy and Physiology: Draper's 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Fall" Term— Lithological, Dynamical and Historical Geology: 
Dana. 



28 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



DEPARTMENT OE ENGINEERING. 



The studies in this Department, for the first, second and third years, 
arc the same as in the general Scientific Course. For the Senior year 
they are in the 

SCHOOL OF PHILOSOPHY AND ENGLISH LITERATURE. 

PROFESSOR SCOTT. 

Fall Term — Moral Science: Wayland's, 

Winter Term — Political Philosophy: International Law 

— Woolsey. 
Spring Term — Sacred Philosophy: Butler's Analogy. 

" " " k - Nat. Theology and Ev. Christianity. 

SCHOOL OF ASTRONOMY AND PHYSICS. 

PROFESSOR STEVENS. 

Fall Term — Comparative Physical Geography. 
Winter Term — Descriptive and Physical Astronomy. 
Spring Term — Practical Astronomy. 

SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS AND ENGINEERING. 

PROFESSOR PIERCE. 

Fall Term — Civil Engineering: Malum. 
Winter Term — Military Engineering: Mahan. 
Spring Term — Gillespie on the Location, Construction and 
Improvement of Roads and Pail roads. 

SCHOOL OF CHEMISTRY AND NATURAL HISTORY. 

PROFESSOR FONTAINE. 

Fall Term — Geology: Lithological, Historical and Dynami- 
cal — Dana: Geological Excursions. 



WEST VIRGINIA I'M \ IRSITY. 29 

SCHOOL OF EUSTOBY. POLITICAL ECONOMT AN D BELLES I.K'II RES. 



PROFK880R QLCM RR. 

Winteb Term— Elements of ( Jritieism. 

school OF MODERN LANGUAGES. 
PROFESSOR Wood. 

The studies of the Modern Languages arc the same as in the gen- 
eral Scientific < Jourse. 

In addition to the Text books prescribed to the students of Modem 
Lanfiruasres, they are required to read a prescribed Course ofLitera- 
fcure, and write Exercises, both by Dictation and Translation, in 
French and ( rerman. 



o<> WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT. 



The studies of this Department are. at present, embraced in a two 
years' course, and are pursued in six schools of the University. Stud- 
ents having creditably completed this course, will be entitled to re- 
ceive a certificate to that effect. 
SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE. CHEMISTRY AND NATURAL HISTORY. 

POFESSOB FONTAINE. 
FIRST YEAR. 

First Term — Inorganic Chemistry. 

Second Term — Organic Chemistry: Zoology. 

Third Term — Botany and Vegetable Physiology. 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term — Analytical Chemistry: Geology. 
Second Term — Analysis of Soils: Entomology. 
Third Term — Allen's Farm Book. 

SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS AND ENGINEERING. 

PROFESSOR PIERCE. 
FIRST YEAR. 

Third Term — Plane Trigonometry. 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term — Chain and Compass Surveying. 
Third Term — Gillespie on Roads and Road-making. 

Students who have not previously studied Algebra will take it in 
addition to the other studies of the first and second terms of the first 
year. 

SCHOOL OF ASTRONOMY AND PHYSICS. 

PROFESSOR STEVENS. 
FIRST YEAR. 

First Term — Physics of Solids and Fluids. 
Third Term — Heat. Magnetism and Electricity. 



W I ST VIRGINIA I MY RR8ITY" 
SEi OND YEAR 

F i km - T frm — M ete< >rol< >gy . 
Second Tjsrm Astronomy. 
BCHOOLOF HISTORY, POLITICAL ECONOMY, AND BELLES L 

ESSOR OLOV ER. 
FIRST YEAR 

First Term — G-eneral History. 

Third Term — Constitution of the Unit •<! States and ol West 
Virginia. 

se ond year 
Third Term — Political Economy. 

SCHOOL OF MODERN LANGUAGES. 

PROFESSOR WOOD. 

French, ' , > ,. , r IM ,,, 

( )])t lonal — 1 Uree I erms. 
Uerman. \ ' 

SCHOOL OF PHILOSOPHY AND ENGLISH LITERATI' HE. 

PROFESSOR BCOTT. 
FIRST YEAR. 

Term — Hart's English Literature. 
m: ond year 
Third Term — Natural Theology. 



The subjects for L K'tures during the coursCj are the following: 

FI RST YEAR . 

Fall Term — The ( Jhemistry, Structure and Physiology of PI 

On the Water. Atmosphere and Soil as related to Vegetables 
On Tillage, Draining and Manuring. 
Winteb Term— On Domestic Animals and their Digestion, 
piration, Assimilation and Excretion. 
On the Composition, Preparation and Value of different kinds 

of Food. 
On Milk. Butter, Cheese. Flesh and Wool as Agricu 
Products. 



32 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

Spring Term— On Horticultural and Kitchen Gardening. 

On the Propagation. Training and Culture of Fruit Trees, 
the Vine, Small Fruits and Vegetables. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Fall Term — On the staple grain, forage, root and fibre crops of 
this and adjoining States, and their varieties and the best 
soils adapted for them. 
On the preparation of soil, seeding, cultivating, harvesting 
and preparing for market. 

On the Origin and Xatural History of Domestic Animals. 

" 
On Entomology and the Insects useful and hurtful to vege- 
tation. 
Winter Term — On the raising, care, characteristics and adapta- 
tion of different breeds of Domestic Animals. 
On Cattle for beef or draught, and Sheep for wool or 

mutton. 
On Horses, Swine and Poultry. 
On Pastering. Soiling and Stall Feeding. 
On Tobacco, Hops and Forestry. 
Spring Term — On Rural Economy. 

On the History of Agriculture, with sketches of the same in 

ancient and modern times ; and in foreign lands. 
On the Adaptation of Farming to soil, climate, market, and 

other natural and economical conditions. 
On the different systems of Husbandry, such as htock. sheep 
grain and mixed farming. 



WEST VIRGINIA I M\ ERSIT1 . 



33 






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34 



AVEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



General Review of the 



Literary Department. 



SCI ENTJ PIC ! » KIW RTM KXT. 



Algebra— finished. 

Universal Hist ry. 

Virgil — Bucolics and Georgia 

Herodotus. 



. I Ge>metry — completed. 
C I Manual of English Literature. 
2 I Horace — Odes aud Epodes. 
'- Homer— Hiad. 



University Algebra. 
Universal Historj . 
French — commenced. 
Chemistry — Inorganic. 

Geometry — completed. 

.Manual of English Literature. 
French — continue I. 
Chemistry — Organic. 



Trig mi metry. 

Constitution of the U. S. and W 

Cicero — De Seuectute. 

II mier — Odvssey. 



Trigon mietry. 

Constitution — L*. S. and W. Va. 

French. 

Botany— Physiological and Systematic. 





• 


Mensuration and Surveying. 


Physics — Silliman's. 




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English Philology. 


Mensuration and Surveying. 






Xenophon — Memorabilia. 


Fiench. 




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Chemistry — Inorganic. 


Chemical Analysis. 




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Analytical < Scorn jtrv. 


Phvsics— Acoustics and Optic*. 




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Logic. 


A i i a ! y t ical G e< mi et r v . 




- 




Horace — Satires. 


Logic. 




2 




Chemistry— Organic. 


Chemical Analysis — continued. 




Rhetoric. 


5— Heat and Electricitv. 




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fc S 


Livy. 


Analvtical Geom. — completed. 




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Plato — Apol gv and Crito. 


Rhetoric. 




•r. 


B rtaay— Gray's 


Manual of Agriculture. 





Mental Philosophy. 
Physics — c tmmenced. 
Analytical Geometry — Optional. 
Euripides— Alcestis. 



' Mental Philosophy— completed. 

I Physic- — Acoustic-; and Optics. 
j Tacitus — Germauia and Agricola, 

Zool igy. 

I Physics : M<i\ ■ Electricity. 
I Political E ;onomy. 

I Demostliene<— De Corona. 
I Anatomy and Physiology. 



Mental Philosophy. 
Meteorology. 
Differential Calculus. 
German — commenced. 

Menial Philosophy. 
Analytical Mechanics. 
Integral Calculus. 
Zoology. 



Analvtical Mechanics 
Political Economy. 
( Jerman — continued. 
Human Anatomy. 





^ 2 


Moral Science. 


Moral Science. 




Historv of Civilization. 


Physical Geography. 






Cicero — Iff Officiis. 


Historv of Civilization. 


00 


'J. 


Geology. 

Elements of Criticism. 


Geology— Dana's. 


-^ 


Elements of Criticism. 


~ 


'■£ p 


Astronomy. 


Astronomy— Descnp. and Phv*. 






International Law. 


Intei national Law. 


— 

- 




Sophocle — GBdipus Tyrannus. 


German— continued. 


Y. 


.. 


Nat. Theol. and Ev. Curistianity. 


Natural Theology. 


— 


V. S 


Astronomy. 


Practical Astronomy. 


r ~ 


Butler's Analogy. 


Butler's Analogy. 




J. 't- 


Tacitus Annals. 


German — continued. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



35 



Courses of Study. 



Natural Theology. 
Practical Astronomy. 
.Military Telegraphy. 
Advanced Guard, Outpost, 4c. 



Mn.n aiiv l»i t u:i HEM i. 


A(,i;k i i ii i: m DSPAKI mi m . 


University Alebra. 
Universal History. 
French. 

School of the Soldier. 


Algebra, I Elementary, i 
History. 
Chemistry. 
Pnj sics. 


Solid < roometry. 

English Literature. 

French. 

School nf the Company. 


Algebra. 

English Literature. 

Chemistry. 

Natural History of Animals. 


inctry. 
< onstitution^-Uuite 1 States. 
French. 
Bayonet Exercises. 


Ti igonometry. 

c institution U. S., and W. Va. 

Physics. 

Vegetable Phj Biol - 


Physics. 

Mensuration and Surveying. 

French. 

School of the Battalion. 




Phj sics. 

Analytical tie try. 

Industrial Dr 
Sabre Drill. 




Topographical Surveying. 
Analytical (ieoineti y. 
Manual of Signals. 
Artillery Practice. 




Uerman 

Mental Phil( soph v. 
Differential Calculus. 
Infantry Tactic- and Practice. 




Mental Philos »phy. 
Analytical Meeh inics. 
Integral Calculus. 
Artillery Tactics. 




Analytical Mechanics. 
Political Economy. 
German. 

Artillery Practice. 




Moral Science. 

Physical Geography. 
Historv of Civilization. 
Field fortifications. 


Surveying. 
Mete irology. 
Chemical Analysis. 
Geology. 


Astronomy. 

International Law. 
Military Law. 
Ordnance and Gunuery. 


Astronomy. 
Entomology. 
Chemical Analysis. 
Leci ares. 



Natural Theology. 
Political Economy. 
Allen's Farm Book. 
Roads ami Road Making. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Fall Term — Geography; Guvot's Common School ; Map 
Drawing. 
Arithmetic — Stoddard's Complete. 
English Grammar — Etymology. 
Latin — commenced. 

Winter Term — Geography; Guyot continued ; Map Drawing. 

Arithmetic continued. 

Eng. Grammar — Syntax 

Latin — Grammar and Reader. 
Spring Term — Arithmetic ; Complete. 

English Grammar — Analysis of Sentences. 

Latin — Grammar and Readers. 

Greelc — Bullions* First Lessons. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Fall Term — Algebra ; Olney's New University, to Involution. 

Book-keeping. 

Caesar — Latin Grammar. 

Greek— Grammar and Reader. 
Winter Term -Algebra ; Olney's, Completed. 

History ot The United States — Anderson's. 

Cicero's Orations — Bullions'; Latin Grammar. 

Greek — Grammar and Reader. 
Spring Term — Geometry; Olney's First Five Books. 

History of the United States, completed. 

Virgil — Three Books of.Eneid ; Latin Grammar. 

Xenophon's Anabasis ; Greek Grammar. 
Regular lessons in Writing. Spelling. Elocution and English Com- 
position from beginning. 



WEST VIRGINIA [JNIVERSITY, 



The coarse preparatory to the Scientific, the Engineering and tho 
Military Departments is the same as the above with the substitution 
pf Citi/ens Manual, one term Cutters Physiology, two terms, and 
Watts on the Mind, one term, respectively for the studies in Greek. 

Tho studios preparatory to the Agricultural Department, an 

follows : 

Fall Term — Algebra ; Arithmetic; Grammar; Geography. 

Winter Term — Algebra; Arithmetic; Grammar; History U. 8. 

Spring Term — Geometry; Arithmetic; Grammar; History. 
Regular instruction in Vocal Music will be given to those desiring 
it ata cost of five dollars a year. The class will rank as an Elective 
Preparatory class and mark's for recitation will be accredited and en- 
tered accordingly. Students of other departments however, may be 
ome members by the payment of the requisite fee. 



38 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



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GENERAL REMARKS. 



Origin of the University, 

subject of advanced education has been in various forms bef ire the people of West Vii i 
Bar years, but without any liberal provision having been inaJe fjr the same until quite recently. 
The Constitution cf the State makes it the duty of the Legislature to "fbatei and eneovram .V><-<//. 
intellectual, Scientific and Agricultural Improvement; and to make provision for the organization of tuck 
Uutiiutiaiu of learning as'the best inlerestsqf general education may demand." The Sati< nal Congress 
having donated < •< tain lands "in order to pr unote the liberal and practi al e lucation of the Indus- 
i rial classes in the several pnrsui sand professions in life," the Legislature accepted the same, ami 
appointed a 1'.* >:ir<l to< rganixe the institution, with Instructions t i "establish Department* qf /■.*./-.■,;- 
/;«<;/ ;, / S ■ /. ,(<•/■, Art, Agriculture, and Military T<ir/i,-. — including <i Preparatory I> />nf- 

Endowment and Funds. 

The pro . ■•■ U of the sale ..i' » nil rrcssional Ian la am tuoted to >'.» i,< I. The citia msof Morgantown 
contributed in grounds, buildings and money, abou1 $50,003, The Legislature, realizing the ne ea- 
-itv and immense value <<\ such an institution ; its incalculable worth t > the youth of the Confmon- 
wealth and of the country, has increased the endowment to about $110,000, with annual appropria- 
tions f tr current and contingent expenses. As no pan of the Congressional grant can be applied t<> 
the erection of buildings, (one tenth only being allowed for the purchase of an ex] eriniental farm,) 
the Legislature has alsi made provision for the supply and Keeping in order of such I mi id in 4- as the 
growth >'i the institution maw from time i" time, demand. 

Ncume and Government. 

At the beginning, in common with some other National Colleges, it was simply called th< 
cultural College." Having been* however, fully adopted by the State, and the means supplied i<> 
aid in its establishment being supplemented by the Legislature, an ad was passed, pursuant to the 
nendation <>t' the Governor, ordering that it should thereafter (»<• known by the style and 
designation of " Wesi Virginia Uxiversitt." It is under the immediate oversight of aboard of 
nine Regents, one from each judicial circuit, appointed by the State and required t>. rep »rt, through 

he (lover ■, to the I-egislature. The bitternew of partlran and sectarian disputes is carefully ex- 
clude l from its Halls, and a brood and manly culture thus Becured to all. 



40 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Scope. 



This Is entirely in accord with the original design of the Institution as seen in the first paragraph 
of these "general remarks." The act of Congress contemplated the founding of Institutions that 
would furnish not only "practical" but also "liberal education" — education "in the several pursuits" 
and just as certainly "in the several professions of life. It forbids the exclusion of "classical studio 1 -." 
and re juires attention to Agricultural and Mechancical Education, Military Tactics, &c. The acr of 
the Legislature contemplated a school of general instruction, and directed the Board to organize 
several distinct Departments, as above enumerated, in the interest of the people of the State and of 
the Nation. 

"We trust that in the extent and in the quality of its work, and the thoroughness of its discipline 
and'culture, as well as adaptation to the demands of the age, the University will prove itself deserv- 
ing of no second rate position am >ng the Institutions of our land. It designs by its instruction in 
Literature and Art — in Language, ancient and modern — in Mathematics, pure and applied — in the 
Sciences, agricultural, physical, mental, moral and social—by its recitations, lectures.Jexaminations and 
elevating influences to educate, inform and discipline the student's mind : to strengthen his moral 
principles, and supply such general and generous as well as special culture as will best prepare him 
for success and usefulness in any pursuit or profession in life. 

Departments of Instruction. 

I. Literary. This embraces a comprehensive and thorough course of general study in nine 
schools, and is equal to that of our best American colleges. It aims at the complete and harmonious de- 
velopment of all the powers of the mind, and provides instruction in all the leading subjects of hu- 
man thought. The student who successfully accomplishes its Curriculum is entitled to the Degree 
of "Bachelor of Arts." For those who have time, means, and ability, it undoubtedly secures the 
highest culture which our best Institutions supply to undergraduates. 

II. Scientific. This is for those whose special tastes or necessities incline them to scientific 
study. It omits the ancient classics except as much of the Latin as is embraced in the Preparatory 
department, and includes the French and German Languages. It embraces studies in eight schools 
and entitles to the Degrees of "Bachelor of Science." In our State and country there is special de- 
mand for such instruction, and this Department is designed in extent and value to be second to none 
other of its kind. 

III. Agricultural. Studies relating to the theory and practice of Agriculture constitute an im- 
portant Department in the University. Young men who desire to study only such branches as will 
enable the Farmer to pursue his calling with intelligence and profit will here find, at small expense 
of time or means, all they need in the way of a sound, practical education. They are not required 
to study any language but their own, nor to go in mathematics farther than land surveying. With 
a good free school education they will be able to accomplish this course" in two years. Those defi- 
cient in elementary studies must spend at least one year in Preparatory studies before entering" this 
department. Several of our young men have hitherto found it plaesant and healthful to spend an 
hour or two per day, at a remunerative price in improving and ornamenting the grounds under the 
direction of the Superintendent. The labor corrs also forms the nucleus of a class in practical and 
scientific farming and related studies. 

IV. Military. The law provides that four cadets may be appointed for each Judicial circuit in 
the State. These are elucated free of cost for tuition, books, stationery, Ac. For such as desire a 
military and engineering education this department is provided. Cadets, however, are not limited 
to this, but may pursue their studies in any Department of the University, subject to the general 
regulations laid down in the Code for the Cadets. Other students are permitted to drill on condition 



WEST VIRGINIA INIVKIMTV. 41 

that they provide themselves, with the neat and becoming uniform of the Corpa. Prill oeca] 
hour on each of four days in the week. The U nil - Government Ubendlr fornishes Um spa- 

tial supplies required for this department These are of the latest and mosl Improved constr 

V. Pbspabatohy. But comparatively few of our young men In West Virginia bare bom* 

: r properly and fully preparing themselves to enter upon regular College studies Thia De- 
partment hre proved a fruitfulsourceof supply for the higher classes, and also the m( . 
tsjning an elevated grade of preliminary scholarship for admission to them. A> the high Bel 
Jbcadeinies and graded schools of the State Increase in number and efficiency . In the same pr | 
will the necessity of thi> Department diminish. Meanwhile, and uniil their increase and fuller de- 
velopment, it cannot l>e dispense 1 with without lowering the Btandard of Collegiate Sm.lv pro] 
shutting out from the advantages of the Institution many of the best and most promlaiag y..ni.. 
of the State. Nowhere else can yonng men be better prepare 1 for advanced studies, or, if ihi^ Is not 
contemplated, are implish more thoroughly and advantageously such studies ;h are here pr n [dad. 

A\<>rii..\ sallowed those students whose special tastes or n< • Qt them from 

graduating in any of the regular Departments. Parents and guardians of students who i tp 
lend the University are, however earnestly advised to* direct their studies with a view to enl 
one ni" these Departments. The attention of those who teach in our intermediate schools i^ sJao re- 
jsaaetfully in\ ited t<> this suggestion. 

A Normal * i. lss, for the special advantage of Teachi rs, i» formed every >pi in^. In this the 
nary school studies are carefully reviewed) exactness and readiness in explanation and definition 
acquired, and instruction in the most approved methods of organizing and conducting seho us i* i 
parte 1. There is also a weekly Lecture before the class on some Bubject connected^with t<a< thing. 

The Trustees of the "Peabody K lucational Fund,'' through their general agent, I>r. Barnae S 
have hitherto place 1 at the disposal of the University, t he snm of five hundred dollars, annually to 
he given to such young men of the Normal Department a^ need assistance to qualify theinsel 
higher usefulness as teachers in West Virginia, or any other state entitled to the advantages of the 
Pea bod v Fund. 



Requisites for . hi mission 



I. All candidates for admission to any Department of the University, must present satit 
evidence of good moral character. 

II. Students coming from other Colleges must produce certificates of honorable dismission fn » 
the same. 

III. Those entering as Students for a Degree in any Department of the University, must - 
an examination in the various studies of the Preparatory School of the University, or theii 

alent. 

I V*. I andidates for sdvam ed standing must sustain an examination In the previous studies 
Department which they desire to enter. 

V. The regular examination for admission of candidates, who have not pursued the proHmim • y 
■ladies in the Preparatory School of the University, « 111 take place on Friday, [Jane 19th,] mi • • 
Ing Comment ement, and on Tuesday , [£ept< mber 1st. | reo eding the opening of the Fall tern . 



42 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

VI. Candidates should procure a copy of the printed laws of the University, also the Treasurer's 
receipt for tuition, before presenting themselves for enrollment. 

VII. Applicants for admission to the Preparatory Department must stand an approved examina- 
tion on spelling, reading, writing, modern geography, elements of English grammar, and arithmetic 
through common fractions. 



Examination, 

I. Each student at the close of the Term shall stand a public written examination upon all the 
studies which lie has pursued during that term. No student shall be excused for non-attendance 
on such examinations, except upon presentation of a reason which may be considered valid by the 
Faculty. No student who may be absent, and not thus excused, shall be allowed to continue in con- 
nection with the University. If at the close of any term a student shall have failed to attain a stand- 
ing of 6, on a scale of ten owing to a failure in examination, he shall be informed of the fact, and he 
may be allowed to stand a special examination under the same committee at any time before the be- 
ginning of the next College year. 

II. The examination of each class shall be conducted by a committee composed of three members 
of the Faculty, who shall, within three days next preceeding the examination, select a series of ques- 
tions not less than nine nor more than fifteen in number, and submit the same in writing to the class 
at the time of examination. 

III. After examination the committee shall examine the papers and determine the standing made 
by each student in examination, which shall be considered the equivalent of one month's standing 
in recitation. 

IV. Before a student shall be entitled to enter a higher class he shall, or a scale of 10, have at- 
tained a minimum standing of G in each study belonging to his clasp, which shall be determined by 
the average of his recitations and examinations. 



Calendar. 



The annual session of thirty-nine we 'ks is divide! into three terms of thirteen weeeks each. An 
interval of a few days occurs between the Fall and Winter and between the Winter and Spring 
terms. Also a recess of about two weeks including the Christmas holidays. It is highly important. 
that students lie present at the first recitation of their classes. The exercises begin promptly on the 
day designated, and any time lost affects the standing of the student, and perhaps embarrasses his 
whole course. u 

The annual Commencement Exercises aie held o:i the third Thursday of June. The Fall Term 
begins < n the first Wednesday of September. 

1874. June 11th. Thursday, !) a. m Vnnual Examination begins. 

" 12th, Friday, ~,}/, P. M Anniversary of Parthenon Society. 

" loth, Saturday, 1 l / 2 p. m Anniversary Y. M. C. Association. 

" 14th, Sunday, 3 p. M Baccalaureate Sermon by the President. 

" 15th, Monday 7)<>p. m inniversary of the Columbian Literary Sociotyi 

" irth, Tueslay, 7% p. M Regents' Prize Contest. 

" 17th, Wednesday, ~y 2 v. M Address before the Literary Secieties. 

" isth, Thursday, 9 A. M Commencement Day. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. |. 

Sept. 1st, Tuesday, 9 \. m Examination of Candidate* for Admission. 

" lid, Wednesday, 9 \. m Regular Work of the University Yi.u: 

i<7::-i begins. 

N ,\ . 26th, Thursday Fall Term ends. 

I>r.\ 2d, Wednesday Winter Term begins. 

•J::<1, Wednesday Christmas Recess begins. 

1875. Jan. 6th, Wednesday Winter Term resumed. 

March llth, Thursday Winter Term ends. 

" 17th, Wednesday Spring Term begins. 

April 23d, Friday Funior Exhibition. 

June 17th, Thursday Spring Term ends. Commeni i mi r. 



Expenses. 



Preparatory Departmenl $5,00 per Term of 13 weeks. 

Other Departments 8.00 M 

Students in the Preparatory Departmenl pay one dollar ; in the other Departments Nro dollars per 
tt ii ii contingent fee. 
Four Cadets may tie appointed by each Regent, free of charge for tuition, )i'«>k^, and stationery. 

Boarding. 

The University Joes not, and does not propose to, Board Students. Ample provision for this pur- 
pose is made in private families of the town and vicinity. The cost, including furnished rooms, 
fnoi, Ac., varies from $3.00 to $1.00 per week. Some Board in clubs at ■-till lower rates. 

Prizes. 

The Regents' Phizes.— To the Student who shall write the beet essay upon ■ given subject, 
$23. To the student who shall be adjudged the best Declaimcr, $15. These prizes to be swarded 
after public competition, i>y a committee of citizens appointed by the Faculty. 
These were arwarded at the lust contest as follows, via: 

.1. s. \V. Dean, Essay, $25.00 

A. F. Downs, Declamation, 13.00 



Discipline. 



The rules of the University require thai every student shall be in his place at all Btated ex 
from the opening to the close of his connection with the University. A record is kept in which are 
tetered the grade of Scholarship of each Student, his absence from tl of the Institution, 

his tardiness, or failure in recitation, unless satisfactorily accounted for. An abstract of this record j 
is Bent at the elos sof each Term in the Preparatory 1». partment, and at the end of the College year 
in the other Departments, to parents or guardians, so that they may see what and how their sons 
and wards arc studying, and h >w they stand in scholarship and deportment. In case of negligence 
Irregularity, or other misconduct, the Student will i e privately admonish ■ l and the p u 
(Han will t>e informed of the fact. Mere Inattention to study will, if persisted In, insure dismission 
from the University. No Student is allowed to leave the town during Cenn time a ithout 
permission. 

students from abroad, under fifteen year-, should have their money -em to, and their hills - tiled 
by, Prof. F. S. Lyon, Bursar of the University. 



44 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Religious Instruction and Worship. 

The exorcises of each day are opened with reading the Scriptures, singing and prayer, at which al' 
the Students are required to be present. They are also required to attend regularly some place of 
religious worship on the Sabbath, and on all occasions to treat the institutions of religion with re- 
spect. The Institution is, and from the beginning has been, free from Sectarain control or domina- 
tion. 

A Young Mens' Christian Association 

is maintained by voluntary a tion of the Students, without interference from, or dictation by, the 
Faculty, or any member of it. This has been in many ways of great advantage to its members and 
to the Institution generally. 

Library. 

A respectable beginning towards a University Library has already been male. About four thou 
sand volumes have been carefully selected and placed on its shelves, including not only many choice 
and valuable books of reference, but also standard works in the various departments of History, 
Biography, Theology, Agriculture, Arts, Science and General Literature. 

"We respectfully request the friends of Education to make contributions to its shelves. In addition 
to those hitherto granted, valuable donations have been received during the past year, of which the 
following are the principal : 



TITLE. 



DON OIL 



VOL. 



Isthmus of Tehauntepec, Explorations and Sur- 
vey of 

Maine, Agriculture and Geology of 

Signal Orhce Report, 1873 

"Washington Zones 

do Observations 

Social Science 

Discovery, Philosophy of 

Free Trade, Sophisms of 

National Industry Protection to 

Slave Trade 

Tariff and Internal Improvement 

Educational Report, 1870 

Prose and Verse 

Greece, History of 

New Hampshire, History of 

Leigh Richmond 

Shakspeare and Burns 

Robert E. Lee, Birogrophy of 

Code of "West Virginia 

House and Senate Journals, AY est Virginia 

Constitution and Statutes of "West Virginia 

Acts of Legislature "West Virginia 

West Virginia Reports 

Governor's Message, &c 

Catalogues and Reports, West Virginia Uni- 
versity, 1867, 1873 

Lectures on Mental, and Moral Philosophy and 
Theology 

Transactions of^New York State Agricultural So- 
ciety 

The Steam Engine 

"Wyoming, Geological Survey of 

Alabama Claims 

Hindoos, History, Literature and Mythology of.. 

History of Valley of Virginia ". 

Sketches of A'irginia 

Peyton, W. M. Memoir of 



Hon. James ('. McGrew, Kingwood 

Maine State Librarian 

General Myers, United States Army.... 
Admiral Sands, United States Navy.... 

do do 

II. C. Baird, Philadelphia 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

John Eaton, Commissioner Education. 
Alexander T. Laidley, Charleston 



do., 
do- 
do.. 

do.. 



do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

F. R. Swann, Charleston 

Hon. C. Hedrick, Secretary of State of W. Va 

do do do 

do do do 

do do do 

do do do 

do do do 

Dr. Alexander Martin, West Virginia Uni- 

versitv 



Rev. James Richards, Charleston. 



Hon. John S. Dix, Governor New York 

John H. Drabell, A. B., Morgantown 

Senator A. I. Boreman, Parkersburg 

Secretary of the Interior 

Dr. J. W. Scott, West Virginia University... 
Col. A. P. White, Romney *.... 

do do 

John L. Peyton, Guernsey Channel Islands, 

England .". 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 1 ."» 

Copies of the Daily Wheeling TnieUigeneer, l>aii>/ Charleii 

. and of nearly all the w< ekly journals in the State, as well as sev< ral from other States, bare 
teen cheerfully donated to the Reading Boom of the University. We trust these are but the begin- 
: larger gifts. 



.Museum, Apparatus, Sc 



The University is in possession of apparatus requisite for thorough Illustration of Chemistrj and 
Phy-ic-. 

Several valuable articles of apparatus have been obtained for the department of Astronomy and 
physics, including a Smithsonian Barometer, by Greene, of New York; a Sextant, by Crichton, of 
tondon, and a Clock, with Zinc Compensation, by E. Howard A Co., of Boston. A 7 it. T« 

en constructed by John Byrne, of New York. It i- oquatorially mounted with right ascen- 
Mon and declination circles, and is a first-class Instrument in everj n 

The School of lii-i rj has been furnished, within the past year, with a huge Mapol the United 
Rates, and a fine sel of Bretschneider and Spruners Historical Wall Maps, ten in number, from 
fete German publishing house of Justus Perthes, of Gotha. Three of White's new Maps of West 
Virginia, have als i been provided for use in different departments of the University. 

The Museum contains extensive Mineralogical, Geological and Conchological cabinets, together 
with many specimens in other departments of Natural History. We requesl all who are Ini 
in such matters to send suitable specimens for the Museum, especially Indian relics, shells, miner- 
al-, fossils and alcoholic- specimens of animals. Such donations will be acknowledged and carefully 
labeled with the name of the donor. There are already over 2,000 specimen- of minerals and fossils, 
and more thai. 2,300 of recent shells. 

Th( vicinity of the University "Hers unrivalled advantages for the study of practical Geology. 
ial attention will he j aid to this branch. 

The laboratory of Practical Chemistry is in operation. The instruction for the present is devoted 
chiefly to analysis, with its application to agriculture. 

Donations have been re; eived during the j « ar, as follow - ; 

l. Suite.,!' Mineral- and rocks, about 50 specimens, from the Smithsonian Institute. 

1. Pair of Deer horns by Cephas Jacobs, Morgantown. 

2. Specimens of Manganese ore by CoL Chambers from near Harpers Ferry. 

iens of Silverore from Colarado, by Br. McLane, Morgantown. 
An Indian relic, by Col. Dennis of Lewisburg. 

uens of Philacteries ; a cane of the Cedar of Lebanon ; and an ancientHebrew Scroll of the 
Book of Easth( r, by Lt. Cbadwick, I'. S. Navy. 

: a root within a root, by Student Dawson, of Pennsylvania. 
Specimens of old coins, by Mr. I.. S. Hough and Dr. Lazier, Morgantown, 
Specimens of old Continental Money, and old documents, by Dr. E. II. Coombs, Morgantown. 
An Indian Stone axe, by J. Crowl. 
A Knife found in an Indian Tumulus, by Student Tabler, of Jefferson Co. 

United States Signal Station. 

By direction of General Myer, Chief Signal officer of the Army, a signal Btation ha- been estab- 
lished at the University for the benefil of Commerce, Agriculture, and Science. It is, at present, in 
eharge of Sergeant P. Dunne, s. s. p. s. Army. Students are by this mean- furnished with spo i.d 
(advantages for the Btudy of Meteorology and related subje t-. The frequent and carefully recorded 
ohservations taken by means of the most Improved instruments will furnish accurate and reliable 
iata for, hereafter, estimating climatic changes in West Virginia. By this means also tie- newspa- 
lers, Board- of Trade, and River men generally, at Pittsburgh, Wheeling and Cincinnati, if they M 
de-ire, can he reliably advised of special movements in the river at the head of navigation. 



40 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



L itera ry Societies 



There are two of these in connection with the University, furnished with suitable halls, tastefully 
furnished, and whose exercises in Composition, Reading. Orations, Debate and Criticism are, in 
many respects, of great advantage to the student. They also afford facilities for the study of, and 
acquaintance with Parliamentary forms, and the acquisition of business habits. The authorities of 
the University will afford every facility lor increasing the accommodations and usefulness of these 
valuable auxiliaries. 

Location. 

Morgan town, the seat of the University, is beautifully located on the right hank of the Mononga- 
hela river, Monongalia County, West Virginia. The scenery around is exceedingly attractive and 
picturesque. The place has long been famous for its s icial, intellectual, and moral culture, and gen- 
oral healthfulness. Coaches leave every morning to and from Fairmont, on the Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad. There is also a daily conveyance between Morgantown and Uniontown, Pa. .Steamboats 
from Pittsburgh arrive every day at Geneva, twelve miles below Morgantown, and at Morgantown 
twice each week. Congress has made liberal appropriations for the continuance of slackwater navi- 
gation in the Monongahela as far as Morgantown. A place more eligible for the quiet and successsful 
pur>uit of Science and Literature is nowhere to be found. 

Grounds and Buildings. 

These are well situated, an 1 admirably adapted to the purposes of the Universty. They are im- 
mediately outside, and within a few minutes walk, of Morgantown. The Grounds command a fine 
view of the village and of the surrounding country as far as the Western ranges of the Alleghany 
mountains. The Buildings rrro models of architectural beauty, capacity, s ilidtty and convenient ar- 
rangement. In addition to Univebsity Hall, the Armory has been recently finished and occu- 
pied. The central part of the Nkw Hall, which already is greatly needed for the every day work 
of the University, and for which a liberal appropriation was made at the last session of the Legisla- 
ture, has been put under contract and is now in process of construction, (irateful for the past its 
friends hope for a bright future for West Virginia University. 



APPKX I) IX. 

Through favor of lii^ Excellency, .John .1. Jacob, Governor ofWesI 
Virginia, the following reports, made at the time in each case indica- 
ted, and not hitherto printed, are allowed to accompany this issue <»i 
t In- ( Catalogue. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE REGENTS 



OF 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



To His Excellency, 

Governor JOEN .!. JACOB. 

In obedience to a resolution of the Board of Regents of West Vir- 
ginia University, the following report and the accompanying docu 
incuts have been prepared for submission to your Excellency, that 

the same may be laid before the Legislature and printed. 



48 WEST VIRGINIA UNIYERSITX. 

Organization of the New Board. 

In obedience to the act of the Legislature approved April 12th 1873, "The Board of the School 
Fund " appointed one Regent from each judicial circuit of the State as follows, viz : 



NO. OF OlRCUIT. 



Name of Regent. P. O. Address. 



1 Ueo. W. Faanzheim Wheeling. 

2 |L. S. Hough Morgan towD. 

3 ('has. J. Faulkner Martinsburg. 

4 H. s. Carr Moorefield. 

"> jl). D. Johnson Long Reach. 

6 F. M. Chalfant Weston. 

7 II. S. Walker Charleston. 

5 A. F. Mathews LewisbuTg. 

1) Isaiah Bee Princeton. 

I I 



The New Board held its lirst meeting at the University Hall commencing June 18, 1873, and wafl 
organized by the election of D. D. Johnson of Tyler county, as President and Geo. C. Sturgiss of 
Monongalia, as Secretary. The report of the President of the University and the report of the Exe- 
cutive Committee together with the accompanying papers, and all the Books, records Ac. of the Uni- 
versity were placed before or within reach of the Board and received due and careful consideration. 

Condition of Grounds, Buildings §c. 

Beside the residence of the janitor, a Magazine for powder and such Stores, and a building hitherto 
used chiefly for storing the Cannon and their Caiss >nswe found on the grounds two other principal 
Buildings. These were the very tine University Hall already crowded to the utmost capacity of its 
Several Compartments, and the State Armory hut recently finished and occupied. There is nothing 
provisional or incomplete about these buildings. They are well designed and well built, and seem 
admirably adapted to their purposes. 

Collections and Endownient. 

The fund derived from the Congressional giant, amounting originally to the sum of $80,000. was, 
at the time the Institution began, increased to $00,000 by the accumulation of interest and has been 
carefully nusbande I and put to its proper use in the advanced education of the youth of the Common- 
wealth, and of the country. This has been increased by successive additions from the State to 
about §110,000, of permanent Endowment invested in 6 per cent currency United States Bonds. 



The Board of Instruction, 



In the Board of Instruction -we were gratified to find gentlemen representing the best culture of 
the several sections of our Country, and some from the old World. These, wc have reason to know 
and believe have worked together with wonderful harmony, ability, and devotion to more firmly 
establish and enlarge the sphere of the University. Some of them have undergone great labor, and 
tiave made some sacrifices, on behalf of the Institution. It will be remembered that every thing had 
to be created, every thing to be organized. This had often to be done under irksome and trying 
circumstances. We doubt if any of these able and cultivated gentlemen would claim that in matters 
so special and complicated as providing for University Education no mistakes had been made. We 
are free to say that these, if any, are few and inconsiderable, and that it only remains on the founda- 
tion already laid by these gentlemen and those who appointed and counselled them to goon and 
buildup an Institution which in its very infancy compares so well in efficiency, equipment, and 
work, with many that are much older and more wealthy. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, I' 1 

Catalogue and Students. 

The Catalogue, (marked A,) which accompanies, and is a part of this report, shows rerj fully the 
mme for Btudy pursued In the b sveral department*! of a lvan< e 1 E lu ati m air, -a lj 
in the University. It will be ol Berve I the curriculum la unusually full and complete, and \s- 
is fully and thoroughly taught. The Department of Literature, corresdon ling to the beat of our 
■parses of study in American Colleges, and the a ientiflc department, are ver) successful, officio nt 
:ml worthy of espe ial notice and commendation, instruction is Imparts 1 In pai 
recitation-, and in part by lectures ra< re or less elaberate accoi ling to the subject and the jud| 
..f the Profess »rin charge. Beside a careful Preparal ,y trainiug each of the above course* i 
four yeirs earnesi study an 1 application t »r Its a scomplishment. A fine class of seven gentlemen In 
the former, ana of six in the latter, was graduated during the a asion of the Board. [I 
ci.d pleasure to observe thai without any appearance of co-ercion or degrading police BurviUance the 
Ptder and discipline of the University seemeJ nearly perfect, in nothing Is our State moredeflcienl 
ai present than in its provision for good secondary Education as a preperation for the University. 
Thi> lias ii,. ossitate I the establishment of a preparatory or academic department. 

Intermediate Schools. 

It baa been a favorite object with the l'n-i lenl of th i University to em ourage the establishmenl 
pi intermediate or grammar schools fn the principal communities of the State, or of classes In our 
graded schools preparatory to the University. A good beginning has, In several places, already 1* n 
■Bade in this direction, it is worthy the consideration of the Legislature whether spe lal and 
rill.- aid should not be given to all such rehools and seminaries as will undertake to do this work, and 
i„ proporti m as they do it. In this way the conditions of the ad of Congress can be fully met and 
;l, ( . University relieved from a kind of work which does not so immediately belong to it. Asa means 
,„ encouraging such a ihools, the Board ask the Legislature, to create four free u :hol irshipa not con- 
: with the military department of the University for each judicial i Ircuit, whi b small be dis- 
tributed, under the direction of the Board as prizes anion- the students who shall exceU In senator- 
rilip in such schools, and thus without any additional expense both foster local schools and make 
them dire tly tributary to the pn sperity of the University. 



Military Drill and Labor Cory 



JS. 



The Military Drill has proved so advantageous to the Corps of State Cadeta thai we could wish to 
s •<• it m we generally applied 1 1 the whole b dy of Students, in regard to its benefits, as sel forth 
in previous Beports, we fully c -near. No compulsion has Keen re pure 1 in thia ... itter and no feel- 
bg that drill is a "bore." Where this is the case it must arise from want of judgmentand 
management rather than from any intrinsic difficulty In harmonizing this requisition of the State, 
and of Congress, with theother work of the University. Each Regenl isauthorized to appoint four 
Cadets, makinga Corps of thirty-six in all who receive their Education In any Department ol the 

University fn sosl for tuition, contingent charges, hooks and stationery, i'oung men of limit- 

0d me .us an- thereby c msiderably assist* l In defraying their expe tses. n, ■ Prof, n « In ■ 
this Department Isdetailed in.,,, the Regular Armyol the United States bj th President, and with- 
out cost to the State, gives his services heartily to promote this interest. lie asks, and the B ard 
second his request, that a small money allowance, say »23, be made t - each of the Cadets, making la 
all an aggregate of only 9900. In consideration of the duties reiuired at their hands thia request 
.,.•(•10-. not unreasonable. 

The Bum of 11,200 should be appropriated for the purchase of b oka for u and this ex- 

penditure need not be repeated as a full supply of books once secured for the Cadeta, would only 

need to he renewed at they might be worn out in actual service. 



50 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

A Labor Corps has also been organized every Spring Term, the member- of which are by what 
they earn, aided s uuewhat in paying their way. The members of the Teachers Class, have received 
to a limited extent assistance from the "Peabody Fund." In these repspects, and in its low rates of 
tuition, the University is a real boon to the poor young man who, by frugality and self-denial has to 
work his way to a good education. No Student suffers disparagement in the estimation of his Pro- 
fess irs or his fellow students for having thus to depend on himself. The St idents 1> >ard at private 
houses in the town, or its neighb trhood. Several of the very best citizens of the place have, we are 
glad to s iv, opened their houses in this way for the accommodation of Students. This system, be- 
side relieving the University from the expense, trouble, and risk of keeping a B mrding hous \ is far 
superior to the old plan which crowds young men by scores into one dwelling. Every considera- 
tion of ec inomy and of moral advantage favors the pr< sent arrangement. It would be a mistake to 
suppose this freedom relieves the Student from responsibility for either bis moral conduct or his ap- 
plication to study. Nowhere, we believe, do inc irrigible idleness, or vic3 feel more quickly or keen- 
ly the presence and power of authority than here. 



Jorindhiral Education. 



It i- very desirable the University should do more f >r the promotion of Agriculture than has yet 
been accomplished. While the original grant of Congress was, in the words of the act, designed to 
"promote the liberal and practical education of the people in the several pursuits and professions of 
Iife''jt is undeniable that the inte:e<ts of the farming community were among the objects specially 
contemplated. These have been by no means neglected as maybe seen in the several branches of 
study pursued in more than one Department of the University. But while its functions in regard to 
agriculture, as well as many other branches of industry, art- already in great part perforate I by direct 
instruction in many subjects intimately related to them as well as by raising the general standard of 
intelligence and culture among the people, it is unquestionable that still more specific attention is ex- 
pected and required to this great interest This has been so well set forth in former reports of the 
Regents and of the President of the University that we need not here enlarge upon the same. The 
purchase of a lew aeres additional to those already belonging to the University would furnish ground 
sufficient for a small experimental farm which at no great cost would be of incalculable value to the 
interests of Agriculture, and would largely conciliate the regard and support of the great masses of 
our farmers. We earuessly ask for an appropriation in this direction. If in view of other urgent 
demands, this cannol now be made we suggest that the R"gents be authorized, according to the pro- 
visions of the act of Congress approved July 2. 1862, to expend tin- ten ten per cent of the Congres- 
sional grant therein indicated, or so much thereof as, in their judgment, may be necessary and de- 
sirable for the purchase of an experimental farm. All that can be, should be done to make indus- 
trial pursuits attractive and desirable, to provide for their future chiefs the most liberal culture, and 
thus counteract the growing tendency to desert them for occupations only thought to be easier but 
in no respect more honorable or useful. 

The New Hall 

The most immeliate and pressing want of the University is the earli 'st possible completion and 
furnishing of the New Hall already in part provided for and under contract. 

The urgency of this is becoming every day more and more apparent. The present buildings are al- 
ready uncomfortably crowded, and the Professors are unduly cramped in their work. When Gen. 
Myer Chief of the United States Signal Service, detailed an officer and sent him with suitable in- 
struments to establish a Station for our State at the University there was no place to locate his office 
except in the Library, and it has since had to be removed to another position only less suitable. 
There are Departments of instruction, in law and medicine especially, essential to the complete work 
of a University yet to be established, and for the accommodation of which there is at present abfiO- 



WX8T VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. .">1 

lately no room. Laboratories of practical science In chemistry, physics and Metallurgy arc only 
very partially provided, and in thi stag* oi growth to w hich the Institution has attained are simply 
Indispensible. Tb • (."niversity, we art- glad u> saj . is i li\ ing, protrtjuy, [nstitution. 

It needs, and deserves, and will amply repay the fostering care of the Bote, li belong! to tin- 
Btata and no other institution lias already made, "r is likely t<> make, 1 ugi r n turni for the pittance 
expended in its establishment and maintenance. Plans and specifications for the construction of 
■oeh a building as in the judgment of the Board, Bhould at once be erected to supply the wants 
herein - t forth were preiiared by Mr. C. C. Kemble, architej t. of Wheeling and w iih slight modifica- 
l by the faculty. Executive Committee, <>r the Board, were approved, and notice given 
that - alcd prop -a N for the construction of such a building would be received. After ! postpone- 
ment and new advertising, to giN-e the largest publicity and elicit the greatest number of bids, the 
proposals were o|m ned on the 27th day of August 1873, and contracts awarded forth* woi k as f< Hon b, 
t<» Addis >n and Watts «>f Morgan town making and delivering brick's and to Klieves, K 
Wheeling the construction of the wholeof the center building including all work and material, except 
bricks, according to plans and specifics *pf which accompany this report as a part here- 
of, at the •inn and pi ice of thirty-seven thousand three hundred and eighty-sis dollars, In manner 
ami form as shown by the following order, adopted without difsonton the 28th of August, after 
mature deliberati in : 

" Th • 1$ >u- 1 having earef illy consi 1 ired th i proposal of Klieves, Kraft A C >., of Wheeling, for the 
construction of tli ■ proposed new building, and deeming th same reasonable, but having no au- 
thority to contract for the same beyond the appropriations already made by the Legislature far that 
p u |p »se, do h >n by authorize and emp >wer the Executive Committee 1 > contract with said K I i«-% •-. 
Kraft A Co., f * the erection and construction of said building to the extent thai the Legislature has 
by its appropriations authoriz -d said contract to be made, and > i soon as the L gislature niaj here- 
after make further appropriations for said bnilding, or shall otherwise bj express authority of law 
approve the proposal of said Klieves, Kraft .v. Co.. then the said Executive Committee shall make 
siieh further and additional contracts with said KKeves, Kraft & Co., in accordance with theh said 
proposal as may b • pn p ir f >r the completion of said building." 

Klieves, Kraft A Co., accepted the award, in manner ami form as set forth above, and have entered 

into contract, and comni need the work of constructing the building, and have made 

and if no delay should b j occasioned by want of funds will complete the same by December 1, 1874, 
and in any event will carry out their contract to the extent of the money now 00 hand, including 
making and delivering bricks, and the contract of Klieves. Kraft A <<>., i > complete the building, 
the total cost of the centre building will not exceed 111,580.00. By reference to the report of the 
Executive Committee it will be seen that there is now on hand or shortly available for this work the 
sum of 122,500.00, leaving the sum of 119,000,00, as yet unprovided to com pie the bnildiBg. For this 
we reap sctfully ask th ■ Legislature to make provision, [f the whole amount cannot b ■ appropriated 
out of th • revenues of tie- fiscal year 1873-1, one half, or in case of necessity, the whole amount, 
might be mil" payable out of the revenues ( .f the year 1874-5. The unanimity with which the 
Board, representing the various parts of the state, have undei taken this w ork, is a suffii lent guaran- 
tee of its nocessit] and its importance to the whole state and its character as a State institution 
lifts it out of the eat gory of local objects seeking state aid. 

The Armory building was constructed by separate contracts for the foundation, and for the com- 
pletion of the building, including work and all materials, exc ]>t cut-st uie work which was done by 
the foot The total cost of the building will not exceed $3,500, and will require do additional ap- 
propriation. 



52 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

Officers. 

The following persons were constituted the Executive Committee for the ensuing year, viz: L. S. 
Hough, Resident Regent, ex-officio Chairman, and John A. Pille. James Evans, J. J. Fitch and D. 
H. Chadwiek. Mr. A. W. Lorentz was elected Treasurer and E. Shisler elected Superintendent. 
W. R. Pastories was elected Janitor. 



Professors. 



The studies pertaining to the Chair of Astronomy and Physics were assigned as follows : Astrono- 
my to the Professor of Mathematics and Physics;; to.the Professor of Agriculture, Chemistry and 
Natural History : and the Chair of Astronomy and Physics as a separate professorship abolished, to 
take effect at the close of the Fall Term of the present year. 

A vacancy having occurred in the Chair of English Literature (the Professor, occupying which, is 
ex-officio Principal of the Preparatory Department) by the resignation of Professor J. B. Solomon, 
occasioned by his election to the Presidency of Jefferson College, Pa., the Board elected as Principal 
of that Department Professor F. S. Lyon. The Preparatory Department by the action of the Board 
is erected into a school of the University, with its own discipline and organization, under the special 
charge of the Principal, with two assistants, both graduates of the University, subject to the general 
supervision of the President. This, while giving greater efficiency to this Department, will allay 
some, not perhaps well founded, prejudices against such a Department in connection with the Uni- 
versity, and which, however willing we might be, under more favorable circumstances in regard to. 
preparatory schools throughout the State, to abolish, cannot at this time be dispensed with, without 
greatly impairing the usefulness of the University. 

The increasing cares and responsibilities devolving upon the President of the University, rendered 
it impossible for him except by undue over work, to properly discharge the varied duties of Chief 
Executive officer, and at the same time to conduct such a full course of studies and recitations as 
belong to any one Chair, and for this reason, and to give more time for correspondence and travel in 
making known more widely the work and facilities of the University to our own people, and for the 
discharge of the duties specially pertaining to the Presidency, and following the example of the bet- 
ter class of colleges throughout the land, the President has been relieved from the regular work of 
any particular (hair, and will take charge of such studies only as the illness or necessary absence of 
any of the Faculty may require, or such as in consultation with them will not interfere with his 
other duties as Executive officer. John W. Scott, LL. D., D. !>., was transferred from the Chair of 
Ancient Languages to the Chair of Mental and Moral Science, and elected Vice-President. Professor 
Robert C. Berkeley, A. M., of the University of Virginia, was elected to the Chair of Ancient Lan- 
guages. Professor Berkeley comes highly endorsed by the Faculty of his alma inciter, and many 
others who have knowledge of his success as an instructor, and the Board feel certain the choice will 
be justified by time. 



The Board of Instruction. 



In the Catalogue herewith submitted will be found a list of the Faculty and Teachers of the Uni- 
versity : 

We feel confident that West Virginia University has a corps of instructors of which even the oldest 
and most successful school of the country might be congratulated in possessing, and the sueess attend- 
ing the administration of its government, the character of the graduates sent forth from its walls, and 
the high esteem in which the Institution is held by the people in whose midst it is located, as well 
as the rapidly growing confidence of the people at large in the character of the work done by it, are 
all sure guarantees of the wisdom of its management and of the firm basis of its future greatness. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 53 

In conclusion, th ■ Board ananlmously concur In tbe opinion thai on the whole, th< 
iitionof West Virginia University ia one which must gratify ita many friendi 
prosperity are seldom Been in institutions of no greater age, and «\ ry indication favors the id 
the buc( — of the past i- onlj an earnest of the larger outgrowth which, \n'hIi 
expet i'«l in the future. 

Respectfully submitted, 

p. i>. JOHK 

\\i>t Virginia University, November it. 1873. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT. 



To the Board of Regents of West Virginia University: 

The President of the University has the honor to submit the follow- 
ing report for the academic year 1872-73. It is also deemed proper 
to present, at this time, a brief resume of the history and develop- 
ment of the Institution. 

The Beginning. 

The act of Congress, approved July 2, 1SG2, establishing those National Colleges which in West 
Virginia laid the foundation of the State University declares the end of their creation is "in order to 
promote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions 
of life.'' By act of the Legislature, passed February 7. A. I). 1867, the State assumed, in compliance 
with the liberal conditions of the aforesaid act, the grave responsibility of doing its part to instruct 
and train the youth of the country on the generous and comprehensive scale therein indicated. It 
was made the duty of your predecessors "to establish such departments of instruction in literature, 
science, art, agriculture, and military tactics, including a preparatory department, as they might 
deem expedient, and as the fundsjfunder their control might warrant." They were also anthoriz- 
ied to create "such other professorships as they might deem essential to the lite and work of such an 
institution." 

At their meeting June 26, A. D. 1S67, the undersigned was inaugurated President, and rules and 
regulations for the government of the institution, and courses of study for its undergraduates, pre- 
pared by him, were adopted. At the same time he was made professor of Mental and moral philoso- 
phy, with Dr. John W. Seott as Prof, of Languages; Franklin S. Lyon, Prof, of English LiteratureJ 
J. Riley Weaver, Prof. Mathematics and military tactics ; and Samuel G. Stevens Prof, of Natural 
Science. The formal opening of the institution took place September 2nd. A. D. l.s<>7. 



Review of Results. 



Great injustice has sometimes been thoughtlessly done the institution by comparing it with oth- 
ers that have been much longer in existence. It should be remembered that these had their begin- 
nings—often very slow and feeble— and that through checkered scenes and stern discouragements 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. .V> 

they hare slowly reached their present greatness. The circumstances which surround, and the 
trials that await your State University are not dissimilar to those which marked their Infai 

Seed not remind you how al -.t entirely destitute th ■ State was of proper facilities for preparing 

young men to pursue with advantage an advanced course of instruction ia 1 Science, An, 

,Ve. Notwithstanding this the Board was at first induced to adopt a very thorough curriculum of 
Study, and to set the Standard <»t' Education high- a • high that with onlj verj slight inodlfii 
|| still remains the same, and is quite equal to the average of our beat American < "11 
limited was the Student constituencj o! the state that during the firel Term less than fortj repoi ted 
themselves for instruction and in that number, but six were found qualified for regular College 
Studies. During the second year from an attendance of over ono hundred only fourteen Students 
Were so admitted. This number was, during the third year, Increased to forty-three ; and baa gone 
oh steadily increasing until the present, shows an aggregate of sixty-two, or, Including the Teach- 
ers Class about ninety advanced Students. During the same tim>\ notwithstanding many and se- 
rious obstacles, a large class has also been maintained of young m.ii pursuing their studies in the 
Preparatory Department of the institution. When it is remembered that thi> is but the sixth year 
atnee the first beginnings were made, and only the fourth of our University life proper, I trust it 
will be seen, in this brief presentation of progress and review of work accomplished, that Weal \ "ir- 
glnia University has not been established in Tain or spent it- strength for nought, it- develop- 
ment, indeed has been such that in view of all the circumstances it i- perhaps not too much t ■ M] 
that it has been but seldom equaled and never surpassed. It freely invites comparison with an] ol 
its own age, and grade, and surroundings, [shouldalso say that during the last four years the 
graduating Class has increased a1 the following rate, via: in 1870, one; 1871, two; 1872, four; 1878, 
thirteen— making an aggregate of twenty alumni all of whom have very thoroughly completed the 
entire Curriculum of study and received the honors of the Institution. 

This, however, would he a very imperfect standard by which to measure the amount of good ac- 
complished. The number oi those who. to a greater or less extent, have been made partakers of the 
advantagi s of the University already amounts to hundred- ; many of these with honor to themst Ivea 
and advantag ! t > the Stat • have been, and are employed in various industrial pursuit-, and public 
professions, and as Teachers in the Free Schools. 

Quality of the Work- Dime. 

It is due to the University, ami to those who have labored for its advancement to say that these 
results have not 1> sen attain- 1 at the cost of thorough work, or of sound and careful culture. The 
constant effort has been not so much to do a great deal superficially as to accomplish wisely and well 
whatever has been undertaken. Above all things else it has been the aim of the authorities to 
establish and deserve a high character for honest and thorough discipline and study. 

Our graduates are alrea ly in demand and at the highest rat •-, a- Teachers, and in other positions 
of honor and usefulness. T > lb ee of you gentlemen, who have can fully examined the curriculum 
of study in the several dep irtments; who have witnessed thehonesl and exhaustive examination to 
Which our students ay subjected ; who are acquainted with the P. »ard of Instruction, and know their 
high character a- scholars and educators and by your personal i;it' rcourse with our Studi nts are ac- 
quainted with their deportment and attainments I could easily have excused myself from saying 
anything upon this subject. A desire to satisfy honest inquirers who fear that, because recent, our 
work may i> • less satisfactory than that dine eleswhere, must excuse reference to tin se facts. 



Means and Appliances. 



It should not be l st sight of thai the above, gratifying as it must appear, is still a limited Burvey 
of the situation. The Institution had not only to commence with but very few properlj prepared 
Students ; it had no adequate buildings, no library, no apparatus, no cabinets or museums ; In short, 



56 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

and in all these respects, had absolutely none of the means and appliances of efficient College work. 
In the brief time that has elapsed our tine University Hall has been built, and is well supplied hot 
with old and useless lumber, but with the most recent and the best of all the above. I invite your at- 
tention n it only to the quantity, and the quality, but also to the neat, convenient, and scientific ar- 
rangement of these in their seveial rooms and cases. In our "Western States there are many, and in 
some of the States East and South of usthere are some schools of age and note, that would be glad if, 
in these respects they were as well furnished as we are at this day with valuable materia! for literary 
and scientific work and study. With the exception of the chemical, physical and metallurgical 
lab iratories our wants in most of these directions are such as from time to time can, by moderate and 
well considered outlay, be easily supplied — valuable additions continue to be made from year to year 
as is seen in our annual Reports, and in the successive issues of the Catalogue. 

A complete sett of both of these I have the pleasure of laying before you. You find us, also, free 
from debt, or other ineumberances. while at the same time a second building, the State Armory, de- 
signed especially for, and which will greatly facilitate the work of one of our leading departments, 
is ready for occupancy. Furthermore the means have been in part provided for that New Hall for 
which there is* already urgent and immediate need, and the erection of which, it is hoped, it may he 
your pleasure to forward with all possible dispatch. In this connection it should alsj be remarked 
that the permanent endowment fund has not only not been encroached upon but has been very con- 
siderably increase 1. The large increase of students in the University classes proper has already bee:: 
referred to. 

, Ickn owledgmen ts. 

Much more might he said. I have only very briefly referred to a few of the more obvious and 
readily appreciated results. I am far from thinking that with more adequate means much more 
might not have been accomplished. But though still very far from perfection this brief review of 
results.attained in so short a time cannot fail to suggest the kind of effort and attention required for 
their production, and to furnish substantial grounds of congratulation. It is useless to ignore the 
manifold and great obstacles encountered. Some of these are inseperable from any considerable 
undertaking; some, the result of the necessary imperfection of human reason and the liability of all 
to mistake, while s one have arisen from ignorance, selfishness, or even wanton desire to injure. By 
divine assistance, and the generous and considerate aid of many friends it is to be hoped the most 
serious hindrances have been, in good degree, surmounted. It is with the profoundest gratitudue 
that, while s one may have been watchful for mistakes, and perhaps anxious to induce them, I can 
at this time refer to the very large and disenterested co-operation of so many others. Some of this 
has been from without the hounds of the State. Words of cheer, and acts of kindness, in themselves 
of greatest value, and still more so in view of those from whome they came, have fallen like a bene- 
diction upon the University and tin se chiefly responsible for its organization and development. 
But from within the State, and without respect to place, or sect, or party has much of this procee le L 
Especially to the gentlemen of the Press, the honorable faculty of medicine, the reverend clergy as 
well as those engaged in the profession of teaching, and of the law, are our acknowledgments due. 
From all these, and other classes, have arisen friends, some of them indeed personally strangers, 
who have wanderfully heli»ed to overcome the great inertia incident to such an enterprise, to arous3 
the people from a State not so much of opposition as of indifference, to give the University right 
direction and momentum, and to get its just claims fairly before the people. It is not tx> much to 
say the InstitutioiUias earnestly and honestly s night to deserve the just confidence and patronage 
of these and of all the people of the State. Just in proportion as it becomes known does it command 
esteem and support. 



WK8T VIRGINIA I'MYEUSITY. .",7 

Hinderances. 

l b ig leave, gentlemen of the Board, briefly t.. refer toon.- ,, r two ot the chief obetaeli •« thai 
main. I congratulate you on the opportunity providentially offered by thorough and Impartial i *- 
amination of all the work and history of the University to effectually remore any bonestli 
Ipined doubts, whether arising from ignorance >.r mlsapprehenaion, >>\ its true worth, character 
and management. One of the most frequent, injurious, and unfounded charges It thai of and 
nominations] influence and control. It has been said thai the tiw Board ol 

composed of those attached to a single branch of the Church. I thai while the good will 

oi all has been earnestly sought, at n.> time and in no respect, baa membership In any of then 
deemed indispensable. As nearly as can be ascertained not leas than »:\ of the religious denomi- 
nations of the State were substantially represented in thai Board. In the B lard of in I 
Brat organized one of the less numerous and three of the principal branches of the Church were 
represented, and about equally. Nearly tin- sam.' proportion lias been continued. The only effort, 
pa Ear as effort In this direction has been made, has been, other things being equal, to secure repre- 
sentative men of other churches as often as the Board of instruction baa been enlarged : ami in this 
and every other way endeavor to make the Institution acceptable to reasonable men of all tI «- 
and feelings. 

The Preparatory Department 

Some objections have grown out of the existence of an Academic, or Preparatory Department in 
connection with the University. Those who harp on this objection, are mainly such as misappre- 
hend either our legal obligations, or the state of education among our i pie, <>r th-relati »t this to 

the other Departments of University. It Bhould be remembered that the Congressional grant was pro- 
vided for the common benefit of the people, not those occupied with the recondite mysteries ol the 
law or of medicine, of theology, or of poliiics exclusively but for th ee also whose life-work Is on the 
farm, and in the shop, and among the ordinary avocations of the world. Some of these contemplate 
only a thorough Academic Education, such as this Department supplies. Beeogniaing this obliga- 
tion the Legislature, on the wise and patriotic principle of furnishing the greatest good to the great- 
•d number, authorized the Board to establish such a school. Aside from legal obligations considera- 
tions of the soundest poUcy suggested such provision. The doctrine of tin; Institution with 
to this Department is expressed in the Catalogue. (See pag ,) and to it I ask your special atten- 
tion. 

it should also be said thai ol our advanced classes probably three-fourths have been furnished 
from this source, some of them, Indeed, entered on Academic study with nogreal expectation of going 
beyond the Preparatory course, but have Urn gradually led <>n until nothing short of the best and 
the farthest the University affords satisfies them. This is entirely agreeable to the experiem e of the 
leal Institutions of the land, most of whom had thus to make a beginning, it is due to our Prepar- 
atory students, as a class, to say that in orderly conduct, in earnest application to stud] . and everj 

element of Hue uianh 1 they compare favorably with those who are more advanced either hei 

elsewhere: For want of suitable accomodations the association of all the Departments, otherwise 
pra.ti.ally disticnt, in one building has, hitherto, been -imply ■ necessity. Hoa Ion.- this -hall con- 
tinue or when the Preparatory coarse can be entirely dispensed with it is for you, gentlemen, a- ii- 
presentatives of the people of the State, to say. Bare it Is, ;•- long as the arrangement exists th.- 
wisdom of all is, as of the other Departments, so of this, t«. make the most of it- 

1 trusl we may look forward to the day when n..t only herebul In every eoonty of lb 
there will be one or more Schools with classes organised and conducted preparatory to the Stab 
University. In this connection I would repeat and emphasise language employed in mi Report ot 



58 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY" 

the Board for 1871. "We can allow oi no invidious distinctions between one Department, or < 1«88 of 
Students, and another. He who in the right spirit does the most And best work is deserving of 
most esteem. If there is any difference we should, if possible, have the best talent connected with 
that department where the mind is hist taught to overcome the inertia which makes study so irk- 
some—and trained to the wholesome and useful exercise of its own powers— where the pupils form 
those habits of attention, self-control, and self-reliance which constitute the highest humanity, and 
so large an element in their future progress and happiness. Here, if anywhere, learning, experi- 
ence, sound and sensible methods, kindness, tact and all those qualities which win the affection and 
esteem of pupils, and aid in the, to them, too often painful and dispiriting beginnings of their 
course, are of paramount importance. If the foundation be well laid, a lofty, beautiful, and en- 
during superstructure is comparatively easy. So long then as existing conditions, and the necessi- 
ties of the case, require us to maintain a preparatory department no just effort should he spared to 
enhance its importance, and to make it efficient and popular." 



Adaptation to Actual Wants. 



It is not unknown to you that the conditions of society, and especially of education, have been 
quite peculiar in West Virginia. Much of what we have here done is foundation work, the most im- 
portant of all for the present, and valuable and productive for the future. It would be worse than 
folly, because of popular clamor, to neglect this for more superficial immediate, and apparent results. 
This has been the fatal rock on which so many attempts of this kind have been wrecked. Time and 
work, and utmost care are prime elements in the healthful, silent, steady growth of a University worthy 
of West Virginia. Nor would it he wis > to immitate too exactly the spirit or the work of some older 
institutions. Many of these have descendel from feudal times, or are copies of those so descended, 
and are too narrow, clanish, and exclusive for the actually pressing, and widely varied wants of 
our own day. Some of the very best, the richest, and most honored of these are heing compelled to 
reform their coins >s an 1 usages in order to kee;> step with the ideas and provide for the instruction 
and training which the present times require. The old ideal of college education has greatly de- 
cline! in public estimation as is shown by the relatively diminished attendance on those that too 
strictly adhere to the f> rmer curriculum. It would not be necessary to go far to find striking illus- 
trations of this fact. It does not follow that the grade of education should, or need, be in any degree 
inferior to what formerly obtained hut that it should he better adapted in literature, Science Ac. to 
actually existing wants. West Virginia University was inaugurated with the declaration that here 
"without discarding what is good, or undue attachment to what is relatively of little worth in the 
old ; and neither ignoring the real advance, or hurrying after the follies of the new, the great object 
will be to render the several courses of study already ordered or which may hereafter be established 
at once as thorough and, at the same time, as practical as possihle." To this the Institution has been 
ever true, and we trust will s > continue. 



Other Objections 



Of less importance might be noticed. They are either such as have even less foundation than those 
already referred to, or are such as in short tiine found due correction. Men, in their own affairs, 
err in judgment and commit mistakes. Much more are they liable to do si in public matters. 
(Gentlemen of independent thought may honestly and honorably differ as to what is best. But 
while it would be too much to expect in all just the right judgment, temper, and experience, and 
th • same unselfish devotion to the interest of the work it gives me the greatest pleasure to testify to 
the high and honorable character of the gentlemen of the Regency, the Executive Committee, and 



west viroiAa i NIYKRsity. 50 

tin- Faculty, and the assistance rendered by them collectively and Individually in the progress ol 

this gr -at enterpris ;. If wrong exists I know Dot of it. [esteem it a privilege to comn 1 the 

University, in all its inter, sts, to your vigilanc , your prudenc •. your inten si in and I 

ih same. Especially may I hope tli.it under y >ur watchful care it will -till l..- kept free from the 

littleness and bitterness of sect and party spirit, and thai 1 1» • - only rivalry * ill be t" se i « ho o in do 

in« si to build up such an Institution as shall I. • a p iwcr tor good In the Mate, the Nation, and the 

world. 

During the Past Yea /•, 

The University has held on its way prosperously and efficiently. It has, In many respects, been 
one of th* most suec ssful in its history — distinguished by the present oi a large number ol Btu- 
lents, Ihj provalence of such a high degree of order and disciplines is rarely seen In < loll se II; 11-, 
and c mini 'ud ible progress in all the elements of Scholarship and Culture 

I resp icsfully refer you to the Catalogue for a very lull exhibition of the organisation, work and 
personnel of the University. The voluminous and satisfactory Reports of the several Professsrs, 
(marked B.,) I also lay before you, hoping it may be your pleasure to give due consideration to tfa • 

suggestions and special requests contained in some of them. • It ui\<> greal 

pleasure to bear witness of the ability and fidelity in Instruction and discipline of all my colli 
in tie- Faculty. ::: * * * 

Rev. J. B. Solomon, A. M.. Professor of English Literature and Principal of the Preparatory De- 
partment, having had tendered him the Presidency of Jefferson College, Pa., resigned his position 
here March 24, A. D., 1873. Professor Solomon was earnestly devoted to the interests ol the Uni- 
versity during his stay with us, and applied himself with great energy to the promotion Of tics in- 
terests, in bis place the Executive Committee were fortunate in securing the services of Pr o fessor 
F. S. Lyon, A. M., formerly connected with the University. I recommend his election to the < hair 
of which he ha- been acting Professor. 

The New Hall. 

Por which pro> isi<»n was s > pr miptly made si the lasl sesi in of the Legislature is already greatlj 

i le 1 ami will be much mere s > before it cau be rea ly tor occupancy. I trust ao time s ill be lost 

la putting it under contract. Should the plans for the same, submitted to you, be approved I re- 
commend that the few modifications suggeste 1 by the faculty in the interior of the building be adop- 
ted. A copy of their action (marked D.) in connect ion with the drawings prepared bj Mr. Kimble, 
accompanies this report. 

Signed Station. 

By direction of Genl. Myer, chief Signal officer <>f the Army and m defference to a request made 
i>>- myself, and endorsed by the Executive Committee, and by our whole delegation In congress, a 
pgnal station for the benefit of commerce, agriculture and science was established at the University 
January 16. A. I ►. i ^T'J. The Executive Committee were glad to furnish every possible facility for 
the convenience of the officers In charge and for the proper location of his Instruments >> il so strained 
are we for room that a part of the Library has to be temporarily occupied by him f< r an efflce. 
Students of meteorology, climatology, practical telegraphy, Ac. will by this arraugmenl i>e fur- 
aished with special facilities for pursuing their work while the accurate determination by valuable 
and costly instruments, and the careful recording of various atmospheric phenomena will furnish 
data which may ultimately be of great value to the University and to the State at large. The pre- 
vious detail of (apt. Pierce, and the liberal supply oi ordinance, Btores, and equipments, made i>y the 
authorities al Washington, and new the further, detail of another officer of the army an 1 the estab- 
lishment and equipment of this station, evidence their good will to our State and its institution 

ami deserves proper acknowledgments. On the many ad' tr bich tl tl Httle 

cost, atlbrd our" students I ucs.1 nut h«_ro enlarge. 



60 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

Land Grants. 

I had the pleasure of attending a national agricultural convention in Washington about a year ago 
called for the purpose of seeking further aid from congress on behalf of these National Colleges, and 
for the further purpose of considering how they could best co-operate with one another, and with 
the Departments of Education and agriculture. The convention was largely attended by many of 
the most influential and liberal minded men of the country. It was found that in nearly every 
case an immense amount of expensive work had been devoted on these Institutions to which the in- 
come of the land fund, even when supplemented by legislative grants, was altogether inadequate. 
It gave me pleasure to find from the discusions that our own Institution had happily avoided sonic 
of the mistakes thai elsewhere seriously embarrasel some much more liberally endowed. A chief 
result of the convention was the introduction into congress of a bill by Senator Moorill of Vermont 
proposing in the coins? of time to further aid these colleges. 

The bill passed the Senate with but little opposition, and passed the House of Representatives with 
a slight amendment, to which I could see no serious objection. This was, however, so near the close 
of the session, and amid such a rush of business that it failed, in its amended form, to pass the 
Senate and there was no time for a Committee of Conference to act. I have no doubt something ul- 
timately will be realized from this source and I respectfully advise that you ask the Legislature, as 
on a former occasion, to memorialize Congress on this behalf. 

Oar IT 'ants. 

Permit me gentlemen to urge all possible liberality towards the school of Agriculture, Chemistry 
and Natural History. This, as shown in former Reports has been by no means neglected, but it 
deserves^ and should receive still greater encouragement. If, indeed, Congress fails to further aid 
these Institutions it will, I am persuaded, be chiefly because of their failure iu some cases to appre- 
ciate and develope that which is. and should be the leading interest of the above Chair. Let there 
uo longer be any hesitation or reserve in taking steps for pushing more fully to the front the great 
interest of Education as related to Agriculture and the Mechanic arts so prominently contemplated 
in the law of Congress. I have so largely referred to this in former Reports that I need here only 
refer you to those. 

Nor should you delay to take measures for the opening of Law and Medical Departments in the 
University. These Professions have a right to look for specific instruction in this Institution.) Beside 
bringing in a special class of students, and retaining our own graduates for professional study it 
would in many ways be of advantage to the University. Why should our young men be compelled 
to visit other States for the benefit of Lectures, of a Moot Court, and such other aids as will enable 
them more fully to realize the importance, and to better enter on the practice of such high and noble 
callings? An Institution like this which contemplates the practical and liberal education of the 
Youth of the State and Country must, while it lives and grows, be constantly developing new and urg- 
ent wants. All cannot be overtaken at once. The elements of time, and means, are important and in- 
dispensible. The earnest interest of the Regents and their sound discretion must decide which of 
the Departments shall, from time to time, receive special attention, and how far. I am persuaded 
the time has fully arrived when the above can be no longer delayed without serious loss. 



Geological, §c, Savvey. 



I respectfully suggest the propriety of petitioning the Legislature on behalf of a Geological, To- 
pographical, and Natural History Survey of the State. Several partial movements have been made 
on this behalf. Some of them sufficiently whimsical, and others too local or interested to be of such 
general value as is desired. Beyond all question the Kegeutb of the State University, and those at 
their command, are the parties through whom a reliable, authoritative, and impartial survey could 



WEST \ IRGTNIA I Ni\ ERSITT. (1 

be male. With one Professor in charge of the Geological and Chemical, another in charge of the 
Botanical and Zoological, a third of the Topographical Interests of such a work, and the ndditon of 
• •nc <»r more thoroughly competent and enterprising Scientists, a i eginning aright well i a made in ■ 
year from our present vacation. Other Institutions beside t li« - University anight secure complete 
Suites of the collections on condition of <■< -operating. A comparatively nai II appn priatioo through 
the intelligent liberality of i lie Legislature would z» far t.> -scenic, without unm ce»jry delay, the 
accomplishment of an enterprise than which none other la of greater importa 
tahe the liberty of submitting through you a form of Bill— suupte, short, and eompri 
this purpose. Such a reconnoisance us would determine the general, character, i" aition, In i 
Ac., of the formations, preliminary to a more detailed and exact Survey of the topograph] 
rocks, minerals and general res >urces « t each county would, in itself, ii proper lj exei ute i. t e of in- 
calculable value. On every consideration of economy and completeness the <■' >logy, Minet 
Botany, Zoology, and Topography should be combined in one Survey, and as soon a^ |m asiblo. 

Free Education. 

I would call attention to the provision far educating free of expense for tuitii d tionery, 

or contingent charge, of four state Cadets from each Judicial circuit of the State- An sxcellenl op- 
portunity of acquiring an Education at greatly diminished cost is thus brought within the reach of 
ieserving and capable young men In different parts of the State. Applicants shoul 1 enter with the 
purpose of completing one of the prescribed Courses of study, and should apply directly to the Re- 
gent of the Circuit in which they reside. It is very desirable you make this regulation known, and 
ill up the quota from each Circuit as speedily as possible. Free Scholarships, without Military 
Drill, might als i, to a limited extent, l>e furnished each Circuit, or even County. 

General Statements and Recommendations. 

This entire record, proceedings and files of the interior work of the University are io the office, 
and at your dis[H sal 



(h-adaates. 



Messrs. Charles M. Babb, of Grant County. 

Daniel W. Border, of Jefferson Counti , 
.Taints I . Brown, of Kanawha County. 
Edmund T. Bulloch, of Wood County. 
Daniel B. Purinton, <>f Morgantown. 
Marcellus L. Temple, of Monongalia County. 
Janus T. Waters, of New York City, 
having with credit to themselves and to the satisfaction of their teachers, acei mpUshed the studies 

of the literary department of the University are, by vote of the faculty, recommended to receive the 
degree of bachelor of arts at your hands. 
Messrs. Win. Lee Roy Boughnea, of Morgantown. 

John T. Harris, of Ritchie County. 

Charles P. Linch, of Wheeling. 

Taylor B. McClure, of Lawrence County Ky. 

Thomas II. Price, of Monongalia County. 

Win. T. Prichard, of Marion County, 
having, in like manner, accomplished the studies si the MdentMk department are |]fl I 'by the aMM 
vote, rccuniaic tided tv receive the dc^rc- of "JJachclor of Science." 



02 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

Mr. Marmaduke Herbert Dent having graduated to the fust Degree of Liberal Arts ai this Insii- 
tution three years ago and having with honor to himself, devoted the intervening time to Profession- 
al Study is, by the Faculty, recommended to receive the Degree of Master of Arts. 

Conclusion. 

In conclusion it gives me pleasure to acknowledge the continuance of the liberal grant by General 
(i. W. Brown, of Grafton, < f Prizes for the Literary Societies. Those to whom they have this year 
been awarded are indicated in the Catalogue. 

Also the reC3ipt from Dr. Barn is Sears, Financial Agent cf the Peabody Fund, through Hon. 
Charles S. Lewis, late State Superintendent of Free Schools, r of five hundred dollars for the young 
gentlemen of our Teacher's Class. Beside other acknowledgments made in last issue cf Catalogue, I 
should mention the very fine Organ, procured mainly at the expense of the Students and the 
Faculty, which adorns our Chapel. 

Gentlemen, I commend with confidence, the interests of this great enterprise to your favorable 
regard and sound discretion ; praying that He without whom nothing is good, or wise, or strong, 
may enable you to discern, and to do those things which will still farther promote the cause of ad- 
vanced Education in the State of West Virginia. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALEXANDEB MARTIN, 
President West, Virijinut University. 
Morcantown, West Vibgikta, June 18, A. D. 187:?. 



ERRATA 



is to 



Owing to circumstances, not r.cce^ry to detail, some errors cf the press occur. Most of these are 
srch as the reader can easily correct. Sonic of the principal are 
On page 51, instead of "now on hand including" read "now on hand. Including*. 
„ .. K.iosteadoi "of BJathematics and Physics ; to the" read "of Matheniuticr, and Ihys: 

the". 
" «' 57, fill blank, where wanting, with (Sec page 41). 
" " 58, second line from top, fcl "mink- read "woik". 
.. " 5:), tenth line from bottom, for "strained" read "straitened". 

«« go! sixth line from lop, for -devoted" read "devolved". 
- tenth line from top, for "Mooril" read "Morrill". 



o^ LO % 



-OF. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



MOROANTOWM. 



1875-6. 



WHEELING: 
JOIIS W. SENTRY, PBIUTEB 

187G. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



CALENDAR. 



According to an order of the Kegents, August 11th, 1875, the College year 
includes forty-one weeks, and is divided as before, into three terms. 

The First Term begins on the first Monday of September, and continues 
fifteen weeks. 

There is then an interval of about two weeks including the Christmas holidays. 

The Second Term begins on the first Wednesday of January, and the 
Third, on the last Wednesday of March. 

The Annual Commencement is on the fourth Thursday of June. 

Prompt attendance at the beginning of each term is very important to the 
Student. 



1876. Tune loth. — Thursday, 9, a.m. — Annual Examination begins. 
" " 16th. — Friday, 7J, P. m. — Regents' Prize Contest. 

" " 18th. — Sunday, 3, p. m. — Baccalaureate Sermon, by the President. 

•' •• 19th. — Monday, 71, p. m. — Anniversary of the Columbian 

[Literary Society. 
" " 20th. — Tuesday, 7|, r. m. — Anniversary of the Parthenon 

[Literary Society. 
" " 21st. — Wednesday, 7.]. r. m. — Address to the Literary Sccieties. 

•' " 22nd. — Thursday. 9, a. m. — Commencement Day. 

11 September 4th. — Monday, 9, a. m. — Examination of Candidates 

[for admission. 
" u 5th. — Tuesday. 9, a. m. — Regular work of 1876-77 begins. 

" December 19th, — Tuesdav. — First Term end<. 



181 



Christmas Vacation of Two Weeks. 

January 3rd. — Wednesday, 9, A. M. — Second Term begins. 

March 28th, — Wednesday. — Second Term ends and Third Term begins. 

May 11th. — Friday. — Junior Exhibition. 

June 28th.— Thursday.— Third Term ends. 

" COMMENCEMENT. 







. 




WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 


3 




BOARD OF REGENTS. 




No. of Circuit. 


Name of Regent. 


V. <>. A.Mr 


1 


GEO. W. FRANZHEIM, 


Wheeling. 


2 


L. S. HOUGH, 


Morganiown. 


3 


CHAS. J. FAULKNER, 


Martinsburg, 


4 


H. S. CARR, 


Moorefield. 


5 


D. D. JOHNSON, 


Long Reach. 


6 


F. M. CHALFANT, 


Weston. 


7 


H. S. WALKER, 


Charleston. 


8 


A. F. MATHEWS, 


burg. 


9 


ISAIAH BEE, 


Princeton. 




Officers of the Board, 






D. D. JOHNSON, President. 






A. W. LORES TZ, Treasurer. 






GEORGE C. STURGISS. Secretary. 






Executive Committee. 






L. S. HOUGH, Chairman. 






JOHN J. BROWN. 






JESSE J. FITCH. 






DAVID H. CHAD WICK. 






HUGH W. I.ROCK. 






Secretary. 






GEORGE C. STURG I SS. 






Superintendent of Grounds and Buildings 






E. SHISLER. 





WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



FACULTY AND TEACHERS. 



President, 

PROFESSOR OF ASTRONOMY AND PHYSICS.* 

Rev. J. W. SCOTT, D. D. ; LL. D., Vice-President, 

ACTING PRESIDENT, AND PROF. OF MENTAL AND MORAL SCIENCE. 

WM. M. FONTAINE, M.A., 

PROF. OF AGRICULTURE, CHEMISTRY AND NATURAL HISTORY. 

ROBT. C. BERKELEY, M. A., 

PROF. OF ANCIENT LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE. 

E. T. C. RICHMOND, Lieut. U.S.A., 

PROF. OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS. 

J. W. V. MACBETH, 

PROF. OF HISTORY, POLITICAL ECONOMY AND BELLES LETTRES. 

JOHN I. HARVEY, A. M.. 

PROF. OF MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE. 

F. S. LYON, A.M., 

PRINCIPAL OF THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 



:; The Studies in this Chair hare been temporarily distributed among the other Chairs. 



WEST VIRGINIA I'XIYKRSJTY. 



Faculty and Teachers. 

(Continued.) 
D. B. PURINTON, A. B„ 

ASSISTANT IN I'KKPARATORV DKPARTMENT AND INSTRUCTOR IN VOi A I. M 

FRANK. WOODS. A. B., 

ASSISTANT IN PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

HUGH W. BROCK, M. D., 

LECTURER ON PHYSIOLOGY AND HYGIENE. 

Hon. JOHN A. DILLE, A. M., 

LECTURER ON CIVIL AND CONSTITUTIONAL LAW. 

Skrg't L. DUNNE, Sig. Serv. U.S.A., 

METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVER AND INSTRUCTOR IN SIGNALING AND TELEG RA I'll IN<. 



WM. DANCER, Janitor. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



AL UMJVI. 



1870. 

Dent, Marmaduke H., A. M.— Attorney-at-Law, Grafton, W. Ya. 

1871. 

Dille, Oliver H.,M. S. — Attorney-at-Law, Morgantown. 
Jolliffe, Wm. E., A. M. — Farmer, White Day, W. Ya. 

1872. 

Drabell, John H., A. M. — Attorney at-Law, Des Moines, Iowa. 
McLane, Allen E., A. M. — Commercial Traveler, Baltimore, Md. 
Smith, Benj. W., A. M. — StuJent-of-Law, Minneapolis, Minn. 
White, Israel C, A. M. — Assistant on Geological Survey of 
Penn., Morgantown. 

1873. 

Babb, Chas. M., A. B. — Farmer, Greenland Gap, W. Ya. 
Border, Dan'l W., A. B.— M. D., Kearney sviJle, W. Ya. 
Boughner, Wm. L., B. S. — Attorney-at-Law, Morgantown. 
Brown, Jas. F., A. B. — Cashier Merchants' National Bank, 

Charleston. 
Bullock, Edmund T. 3 A. B— L. L. B., Columbian Law School. 
Harris, John T., B. S. — Journalist, Florida. 
Linch, Geo. P., B. S.— Attorney-at-Law, Wheeling. 
McClure, Taylor B., B. S.— Prin. of Lawrence Academy, 

Louisa, Ky. 

Price, Thos. H., B. S.— Student of Medicine, Jefferson College, 
Philadelphia. 

Prichard, W^m. T., B. S.— Attorney-at-Law, Fairmont, W. Ya. 

Purinton, Dan'l B., A. B.— Tutor W. Ya. University, Morgan- 
town. 

Temple, Marcellus L., A. B— Attorney-at-Law, Osceola, Iowa. 

Waters, Jas. T., A. B.— Attorney-at-Law, Hempstead, L.I., N. Y. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



1874. 

Chadwick. Pic'd. V., A. B. — Student of Law, Washington, I>. C. 
Dkan, John S. W., A. B. — Prof. Ancient Languages, Penn. State 

College. 
Howell, Wm. M., A. B. — Prof. Ancient Languages, Amsterdam 

Female Seminary, N. Y. 
Jacobs, Tiios. P., A. B. — Student of Law, Morgan town. 
Lynch, Chas. W., A. B. — Principal of Graded School, Burning 

Springs. 
Morran, Ellsworth E., A. B. — Theological Seminary, Princeton. 

N. J. 
Woods, Frank, A. B. — Tutor W. Va. University, Morgantown. 

1875. 

Adams, Samuel Shugert, A. B — Medical Student, Washington, 

1). C. 
Dolliver, 11. II., A. B. — Teacher in Indiana. 
Dolliver, J. P., A. B. — Teacher in Illinois. 
Golden. Franklin A , B. S. — Teacher in New Orleans. La. 
Martin, James V., A. B — Teacher in Indiana. 
Peterson, J. J., A. B. — Teacher, Buckhanon, Upshur Co. 
Plrinton, A. L., A B. — Teacher West Nottingham Academy, Md. 



8 WEST VIRGINIA 


UNIVERSITY. 


UNDERGRADUATES. 




Seniors. 


Anderson, John C 


Sci. 


.Easton, Monongalia Co. 


Frasher, Luke H 


Class. 


.Tippecanoe, Fayette Co., Pa. 


Hubbard, Harry Dana. 


Sci. 


.Wheeling. 


*Ison, Willey Owens. ... 


Class. 


..Morgantown. 


> Kemp, Howard Mason. 


Sci. 


..Bloomington, Md. 


Laidley, George Summers Sci. 


.Charleston, Kanawha Co. 


Nash, James Henry 


Sci. 


.Buffalo, Putnam Co. 


Ramage, Thomas C 


Sci. 


.West Milfbrd, Harrison Co. 


Wetzel, Daniel Elliott .. 


Class. 


.Burning Spring, Wirt Co. 




Junio 


rs. 


*Boyers, James S 


Class. 


..Randall, Monongalia. 


Brown, William Gay.... 


Class. 


..Kingwood, Preston Co. 


Dille, Clarence B 


Class. 


..Morgantown. 


^Hawthorne, Joseph H. 


Class.. 


.Randall, Monongalia Co. 


Hood, Thomas M 


Class. 


.Lowsville, Monongalia Co. 


* Jacobs, William L 


Class. 


..Morgantown. 


Rogers, Daniel R 


Class. 


..Morgantown. 


*Smith, Everett C 


Sci. 


..Spencer, Roane Co. 


*Snively, Harry J 


Sci. 


..Grafton. 


Steele, John L 


Class. 


.Morgantown. 


Stewart, James P 


Sci. 


..McCoy's Sta. Jefferson Co. 0. 




Sophomores. 


Courtney, Alpheus F.... 


Sci. 


..Randall, Monongalia Co. 


Dayton, Alston Gordon 


Class.. 


.Philippi, Barbour Co. 


*Lee, James McMillen. 


Class. 


.Holliday's Cove, Hancock Co. 


Morgan , Benjamin S 


Class. 


.Laurel Point, Monongalia Co. 


Marsh, Enoch Jasper.. . 


Class. 


.Morgantown. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 9 

SOPHOMORES.— Coniinued. 

Park. George W Class... Ravens wood, Jacksori I 

♦Pifer, Felix C Class... Buck hann on, Upshur Co. 

Rich, Daniel Class... Laurel Point Monongalia Co, 

Staggers, Thomas B Opt.. .Mo rgant own. 

Freshmen. 

Chad wick, David Opt. .Morgan town. 

Drabell, Meigs Jackson Opt... Morgan town. 

Haymond, Frank Thompson. ..Opt... Morgan town. 

Holley, Elisha Walter Sci... Hamlin, Lincoln Co. 

Johnston, Walter McDaniel Sci. ..Union, Monroe Co. 

Protzman, Lowell Mason Class... Morgan town. 

Reed, Charles Baguley Sci. ..Wheeling. 

Sweeney, Andrew Thomas Opt... Wheeling. 

Vandervort, Virgil Agr... Morgan town. 

Wade, Spencer Opt . . .Morgan to w n . 



Clas>. — Classical Course. Sci. — Scientific Coarse. Opt. — Optional Course. 
Agr. — Agricultural Course. -Conditioned. 



10 


WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 




PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 




FA CULT Y. 




Rev. J. W. SCOTT, D. D., LL. I)., 




ACTING TRESIDENT. 




F. S. LYON, A. M., 




PRINCIPAL. 




E. T. C. .RICHMOND, Lieut. U. S. A., 




Commandant of Cadeis. 




D. B. PURINTON, A. B., Sect., 




Instructor in Vocal Music and Assistant. 




FRANK WOODS, A. B. 




Assistant. 




* 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 11 


Preparatory St it den ts. 


Seconc 

Capehart, John Clarence 

Chapman, John Warner 

Davisson, Ithamar 

Dix, Philip Arthur 

Fitch, Dorsey Plummer 


1 Year. 

.St. Albans, Knnawa Co. 
..Warsaw, Indiana. 
..Webster, Taylor Co. 
.Buckhannon, Upshur Co. 
..Morgantown. 
..Grafton, Taylor Co. 
.New Cumberland, Hancock Co. 
.Mt. Pleasant, Frederick Co.. lid. 
..Grafton, Taylor Co. 
.Morgantown. 

c< 

(( 
If 

u 
a 

a 

..Lcwisburg, Greenbrier Co. 
.Cassville, Monongalia Co. 
..Wheeling. 
..Pittsburg, Pa. 

.Patterson's Creek, Mineral Co. 
.Morgantown. 

u 
(I 

..Philippi, Barbour Co. 
.Point Marion, Fayette Co., Pa. 


Glascock, Jacob Luther 


Grafton Charles Edwin 


Hammond, Dawson Edward 

Hardic, John Robert 

Hough, Walter 

Houston, Waitman Willey 

Ison, Heber Allen 

Xeck, Leonidas Virginirprt 


Macbeth, James Edward 

Marsh, Thomas 


Marsh. John Nelson 

M'Vicker, Emery Alvin 


Montgomeiy, Zack Jacob 

Ramsey, Marion Cole 

Reed, John Thoburn 


Richardson, David Rittenhousc. 

Robinson, Claud Ernest 

Rogers, G eo rge 

Steele, Wm. Alexander 

Vandervort, Bruce 


Woods, Samuel Van Horn 

Zearley , Addis 



12 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, 


First Year. 


Ankrom, Samuel Barnctt 


..Sistersville, Tyler Co. 


Bassel 1 , B urr 


..Lost Creek, Harrison Co. 


Coleman, Theodore Van kirk.... 


..Morgan town. 


Coombs, Wilber Dayton 


..Easton, Monongalia Co. 


Courtney, Mellville C 


..Randall, Monongalia Co. 


Dav isson , Floyd 


..Webster, Taylor Co. 


Eakin, William S. T 


..Granville, Monongalia Co. 


Elliott, Adoniram Judson 


..Eeedsvillc, Preston Co. 


G-r iggs, Millard 


..Smith town, Monongalia Co. 


Hall, Jesse Jasper 


..Morgantown. 


Hustead, Ashbel Fairchild 




Jones, Henry Clark 


..Laurel Point, Monongalia Co. 


Koontz Omer 


..Morgantown. 


Lamon, James Milton 


..Mill Creek, Berkeley Co. 


Lorentz, Charles Frederick 


..Morgantown. 


Mapel, Newton James 


..Eosedale, Greene Co., Pa. 


Mapel, Walter Peter 


u « 


McCoy, William Leonard 


..Granville, Monongalia Co. 


Eobinson, Albert Mosser 


..Glade Farms, Preston Co. 


Shean, Frank A 


..Morgantown. 


Smell, Albert 


..Easton, Monongalia Co. 


Snodgrass, David Sylvester 


..Granville, " 


Snodgrass, Jesse Marcellus 


U (( 


Snyder, Martin Luther 


Stout, Benjamin Fillmore 


..Bridgeport, Harrison Co. 


Wagner, Florence Eahn 


..Morgantown. 


Waters, George Washington.... 




Wiley, John Wesley 


..Wadestown, Monongalia Co. 


Woodford, Alonzo Harvey 


..Pleasant Creek, Barbour Co. 


Wright, Palmon John 


..Morgantown. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 13 



liecapitu lation. 

Sen iors 9 

Juniors 11 

Sophomores ! I 

Fresh nun 10 

First Preparatory Students : 30 

Second Preparatory Students 27 

Total 96 



14 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



MILITARY DEPARTMENT. 



FACUL TY. 



Rex. J. W. SCOTT, D. D., LL.D. 

ACTING PRESIDENT. 

E. T. C. KICHMOXD, Lieut. U. S. A. 

COMMANDANT. 

Staff. 

Cadet Harry D. Hubbard, Second Lieutenant and Adjutant, 
Cadet Geo. S. Laidlev, First Lieutenant and Ord. Officer. 



Commissioned Officers. 

Cadet James H. IN" ash, Captain. 
Cadet Willey O. Ison, First Lieutenant. 
Cadet Geo. S. Laidley, First Lieutenant. 
Cadet Thomas M. Hood, Second Lieutenant. 
Cadet Harry D. Hubbard, Second Lieutenant, 



Cadet James M. Lee, Color Sergeant. 



WJCST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



15 



ROSTER OF STATE CADETS. 



Cadet John L. Steele, First Sergeant. 
Cadet Geo. W. Park. Sergeant. 
Cadet A G. Dayton, Sergeant. 
Cadet E. G. Marsh, Sergeant. 



II. 



III. 



IV. 



VI. 



Name. 



Remarks. 



i:.m.isi i d. 



James 1£. Lee 

Charles B. Reed 

Charles B. Grafton..] 
^Andrew Sweeney... 

Benjamin Ramage.. 

Thomas M. Hood.... 

-I John L. Steele 

| J. II. Hawthorne... 

E.J. Marsh 



Present for duty... 
Present tor duly... 
Present for duty... 
Present lor duty... 



Sep. 
Oct. 

Oet. 
Oct. 



Honorably 
Present for 
Present for 
Present for 
Present for 



Sep. 
Dec. 
Sep 

Mar 
iOet. 



r Jas. W. Vander.vort Honorably disci 
| Geo. W. M. Tabler.. 

| Claude S. Jarvis 

-J Benj. S. Morgan 

I John T. Peed 

j Vacancy 

^ Vacancy 



Resigned 
Resigned... 
Present tor 

Present for 



disch'd. 
duty... 
duty., 
duty... 
duty... 

(l..'.\,v 

Dec. 

Mar 

duty < >ct. 

duty Xov 



20, 1873 

B. L873. 

1, 1875 

1, 187f). 

t, 1874. 
30, L872. 
5, 1873. 
26, 1875. 

18, 1873. 

21, 1873. 
13, 1872. 
P.'. 1875. 
1, 1855. 

7."). 



1- 



(John D. Masters 

| Claude B, Robinson 

\ B. P. Stout 

I Daniel Rich 



aeancy 



Honorably disch'd... Oct. 
Present for duty.... 

Present for duty Mar. 

Present for duty Nov 



f Willey O. Ison 

J Harry J. Snively.... 

] Geo. W. Park...: 

I Samuel B. Ankrom. 



(J. S. W. Bailey.... 

j M. E. Dent 

J Alston G. Dayton. 

] Felix C. Pifer 

j BurrBassell 

I Vacancy 



Present fur duty.. 

Present for duty.. 
Absent with leave 
Pnsent for duty.. 



Honorably disch'd . 
Dropped from roll . 

Present for duty 

Suspended 

Present for duty 



18, 1873, 
9. 1874. 
28, 1876. 
5, 1875. 



Oct. 

Jan. 
Oct. 

Mar 

Sep. 

Dee. 

Sep. 
Dee. 

Mar 



20, 1870. 

16, L874. 

18, 1-:::. 

27, L876. 

17. 1874 

4, 1874. 

5, 1873. 
13, L872. 

28, 1876. 



16 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



KOSTEK OF CADETS.— Continued. 



District. 



VII. 



VIII. 



IX. 



Name. 



f £. C. Smith 

| James H. Nash.... 
•| George S. Laid ley 
| Jchn 0. Capehart. 
(^Vacancy 



M. W. Chiddester.. 

Benj C. McNutt 

John W. Chapman. 

( Philip A. Dix 

j Walter M. Johnston 

Z. J. Montgomery.. 
[Vacancy 



fB. B. Curry 

| Elisha Holly 

| *Edward Macbeth... 
Harry D. Hubbard.. 
Alpheus F.Courtney 
I. Davisson 

^Vacancy 



Remarks. 



Resigned ., 

Present for duty. 
Present for duty. 
Present for duty. 



Honorably disch'd. 
Honorably disch'd. 
Vol. hon. disch'd.... 

Present for duty 

Present for duty 

Present for duty 



Honorably disch'd 

Resigned 

Dropped from roll. 
Present for duty... 
Present for duty... 
Present for duty... 



Enlisted. 



Sep. 5, 1873. 

Oct. 16, 1371. 

Sep. 5, 1S73. 

Oct. 1, 1875. 



Oct. 23, 1874. 

Oct. 18, 1873. 

Sep. 25, 1874. 

Sep. 29,1874. 

Oct. 23, 1873. 

Oct. 1, 1875. 

Sep. 5, 1873. 
Sep. 4, 1874. 
Nov. 5, 1875. 
May 22, 1874. 

1875. 

1876. 



Nov. 5, 
Jan. 5, 



^Failed to reach the stand of scholarship for cadets. 

Distinguished Cadets.- - 1875 '.* 



Name. 



Alston G-. Dayton 

Felix C.Pifer 

James H. Nash , 

George S. Laidlcy , 

Philip A. Dix 

Harry D. Hubbard 

James M. Lee 

Charles B. Reed 

John L. Steele 

E. J. Marsh 

James W. Vandervort. 

Willie O. Ison 

Harry J. Snively 

George W. Park 



Classical. 



Classical. 



Classical. 
do 



do 



Classical, 
do 
do 



Military. 



Military, 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Military, 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



*In accordance with regulations established for the government of the Corps, the above 
Cadets are reported as distinguished in the departments opposite their names, by reason of 
having attained a yearly average of 900 and upwards on a scale of 1000. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



VOCAL MUSIC 



D. B. EURINTON, A. B., Instruc 



rou. 



Two years ago, the Regents added Yoeal Music to the Studies 
of the University. It is open, free of charge, to Btudents of all 
departments alike The course of Instruction embraces our war. 
as follows : 

Fall Term. — Eudiments and Elementary Practice. 

Winter Term. — Eudiments Continued. Glee and Chorus 
Singing. 

Spring Term. — Lectures on Harmony and Composition. Chorus 
Singing, Review, &c. 



♦Anderson, J. C. 
Boj-ers, J . S. 
♦Coleman, T. V. 
Courtney. A. P. 
♦Coombs, W. L. 
♦Dayton, A. G. 
*Dix, P. A. 
Eakin, W. S. T. 
Elliott, A. J, 
*Frasher, L. II. 
♦Hawthorne, J. II. 



Stud e Jits. 



Hough, w. 

♦Hubbard, H. D. 
[son, H. A 

Keck, L. V. 
♦Lee, J. Mc. 
♦Marsh, E. J. 
Marsh, J. N 
Rogers, D. 
.Rogers. G. 
Smith, E. C. 
Snyder, M. L. 



■>For Practice. 



18 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



TELEGRAPHING AND SIGNALING. 



L. DUNNE, Serg't Sig. Ser. IT. S. A. 
Instructor. 



Name 



Laidley, G-. S 

Pifer, F. C 

Ison, H. A 

Lorentz, C. F 

Grafton, C. E 

Eeed, J. L 

Hustead, A. F 

Hall, J. J 

Capehart, J. C... 

Brown, W. G 

Hammond, I). E. 

Kemp, H. M 

Macbeth J. E , 



Telegraphy. 



Telegraphy. 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Signaling. 



Signaling. 



Signaling. 



Signaling. 



Requisites for Admission. 

I. All candidates for admission to any Department of the 
University, must present satisfactory evidence of good Moral 
character. 

II. Students coming from other Colleges must produce certifi- 
cates of honorable dismission from the same. No admission to 
the Senior Class is allowed after the beginning of the Second 
Term. 

III. Those entering as Students for a Degree in any Depart- 
ment of the University, must sustain an examination in the vari- 
ous studies of the Preparatory School of the University, or 
their equivalent. 



WEST V1RGIMA rSIVKllSITY. 19 



IV. Candidates for advanced Btanding must sustain an ex- 
amination in the previous studies of the Department which they 
desire to enter. 

V. The regular examination for admission oi candidates, who 

have not pursued the preliminary studies in the Preparatory 
School of the University, will take place on Friday, succeeding 
Commencement, and on the first day of the First Term. 

VI. Candidates should procure a copy of the printed laws oi 

the University, also the Treasurer's receipt for tuition, before 
presenting themselves for enrollment. 

VII. Applicants for admission to the Preparatory Department 
must stand an approved examination on spelling, reading, writ- 
ing, modern geography, elements of English grammar, and 
arithmetic through common fractions. 

VIII. Students are required to pronounce Greek and Latin ac- 
cording to the so called Continental method. 



20 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



COURSES OF STUDY 



The instruction thus far provided for in the University is 
embraced in six departments, viz : The Classical, Scientific, 
Agricultural. Engineering, Military; and for those desiring to 
qualify themselves for regular admission to any of these, a Pre- 
paratory Department. No study has been dropped from any 
of these departments, but the method of stating what is requir 
ed in each, has been simplified in the present Catalogue. 



CLASSICAL DEPARTMENT. 

The studies in this Department, required for the Degree of 
Bachelor of Arts, are as follows : 



Freshman Year. 

First Term. 

Virgil — Bucolics and Georgics ; Prose Composition. Gilder 

sleeve's Grammar and Exercise Book. 
Herodotus; Greek Prose Composition and Greek Grammar. 
Universal History — Anderson. 
Universal Algebra — Robinson. 
Elocution. 

Second Term. 

Horace — Odes and Epodes ; Latin Prose Composition (com 
tinued.) 



WEST VIRGIMA UNIVERSITY. 21 



Homer — Iliad; Greek Prose Composition (continued I 

English Literature — Shaw, 

Geometry (completed); Solid and Plan,* Trigonometry (com 

menced.) 

Elocution. 

Third Term. 

Cicero — Dc Senectute and De Amicitia; Exercises in Latin P 
Composition. 

Homer — Iliad : Prose Composition. 

Constitution of the United States and of West Virginia. 

Plane Trigonometry (Completed) ; Spherical Geometry and Trig- 
onometry. 

Elocution. 

Sophomore Year. 

First Term. 

Xenophon — Memorabilia ; Exercises in Greek Composition. 
Rhetoric — Haven. 

Mensuration; Surveying; Navigation. 
Chemistry. Inorganic, — Eliot and Storer. 
Elocution. 

Second Term. 

Horace — Satires and Epistles; Exercises in Latin. 

Logic — Coppee. 

Composition. 

Analytical Geometry (First Part), and Differential Calculus — 

Olney's. 

Chemistry — Organic. 

Elocution. 

Third Term. 

Livy — Lincoln ; Exercises in Latin Composition. 

Plato — Crito and Apology ; Exercises in Greek Composition. 

Botany — Gray. 

English Philology. 

Elocution. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Junior Year. 

First Term. 

Euripides' Alcestis ; or French. 

Mental Philosophy : The Intellect — Haven, and Lectures. 
Physics, General Principles — Solids and Fluids. 
Analytical Geometry (Optional.) 

Second Term. 

Tacitus — Gerraania and Agricola ; Latin Composition ; or 

French. 
Mental Philosophy : The Sensibilities and the Will — Haven, and 

Lectures. 
Physics — Pneumatics, Acoustics, Optics. 
Integral Calculus. (Optional.) 
Zoology — Nicholson. 

Third Term. 

Demosthenes on the Crown, with Written Exercises ; or French. 

Physics — Heat, Correlation of Forces, Electricity. 

Political Economy — Perry. 

Human Anatomy and Physiology — Draper. 

Senior Year. 

First Term. 
Cicero— De Officii?, with Written Exercises on Historical Subjects; 

or German. 
Moral Philosophy — Gregory. 
History of Civilization — Guizot. 
Geology, Lithological, Dynamical and Historical — Dana. 

Second Term. 
Sophocles — (Edipus Tyrannus ; or German. 
Elements of Criticism — Lord Kames. 
Astronomy, XII. Chapters — Loomis. 
International Law — Woolsoy. 



WEST VIRG1S1A UNIVERSITY 23 



Third Term. 

Tacitus — Annals ; or German. 
Astronomy. (Completed.) 

Butler's Analogy, Natural Theology and Alexander's ESvidei 
of Christianity. 

If, in this Department, the student selects the French or Gor- 
man instead of the Latin or Greek, he shall be required to study 
them respectively during three successive Terms, and such selec- 
tion must be made at the beginning of the Junior or Senior 
Year. The text books for the Junior Year are the same as those 
of the Scientific Freshman, and for the Senior Year, the same as 
Junior Scientific. 

II. 

SCIENTIFIC DEPARTMENT. 

The studies in this department required for the Degree of Bach- 
elor of Science are the following : 

Freshman Year. 

First Term. 

University Algebra — Eobinson. 

French — Lamniellier and Monsanto's French Course. 

Universal History — Anderson. 

Chemistry (Inorganic) — Eliot and S tor or. 

Elocution. 

Second Term. 

Geometry (completed), solid and plane trigonometry commenced. 
French — French Course continued; Smith's French Principia, 

Fart II. 
English Literature — Shaw, 
Chemistry (organic.) 
Elocution. 



24 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Third Term. 

Plane Trigonometry (completed) — Spherical geometry and Trig- 
onometry. 

French — French Course completed, Principia II., Telemaquc, 
(Surenne's.) 

Constitution of the United States and of West Virginia. 

Botany — Gray's School and Field Book. 

Elocution. 

Sophomore Year. 

First Term. 

Mensuration, Surveying and Navigation — Pobinson. 

French- -Voltaire, Charles XII., French Grammar and exercises. 

Rhetoric — Haven. 

Physics, General Principles — Solids and Fluids. 

Elocution. 

Second Term. 

Analytical Geometry (First Part) and Differential Calculus. 

Logic — Coppee. 

Chemical Analysis. 

Physics — Undulations, Acoustics, Optics, Problems. 

Elocution. 

Third Term. 

Analytical Geometry (Second Part) and Integral Calculus. 
French— Moliere's Misanthrope, French Grammar and Exercises. 
Physics— Heat; Magnetic, Statical, and Dynamical Electricity. 
Elocution. 

Junior Year. 

First Term. 

Meteorology — Loom is. 

German — Worman's German Grammar. 

Mental Philosophy, The Intellect— Haven, and Lectures. 



WEST VIRG IMA UNIVERSITY. 25 



Second Term, 
Analytical Mechanics — Peck'. 

German — German Grammar continued, Gorman Reader. 
Zoology — Nicholson. 

Mental Philosophy — The Sensibilities and the Will— Haven, and 
Lectures. 

Third Term. 

Analytical Mechanics (Completed.) 

German — Grammar completed; Schiller's Jangfran or Maria 

Sluart 
Political Economy — Perry. 
Human Anatomy and Physiology — Draper. 

Senior Year. 

First Term. 

Moral Philosophy — Gregory. 

German — Goethe's Iphigcnia in Tauris. or Egmont ; Whitney's 

Grammar and Exercises. 
History of Civilization — Guizot. 
Gcolog}* — Lithological, Dynamical and Historical — Dana. 

Second Term. 

J international Law — Woolsey. 

German---Fouque's Undine; Whitney's Grammar and Exerci 
Elements of Criticism---Lord Karnes. 
Astronomy — Descriptive and Physical. 

Third Term. 

Butler's Analogy ; Natural Theology ; Alexander's Evidences of 

Christianity, 
German (Optional) — Evans' German Literature ; Grammar and 

Exercises. 
Practical Astronomy — Calculation and Construction <>f Bdi] 

verified by the Nautical Almanac. 
Physical Geography — Guyot. 

4 



26 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

III. 
DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING. 

The studies in this Department for the first, second and third 
years are the same as in the Scientific Course. For the Senior 
year they are as follows : 

First Term. 

Civil Engineering — Mahan. 
Moral Philosophy — Gregory. 

Geology — Lithological, Historical and Dynamical — Dana. Geo- 
logical Exercises. 

Second Term. 

Military Engineering- --Mahan. 
Astronomy — Descriptive and Physical. 
International Law — YVoolsey. 
Elements of Criticism — Karnes. 

Third Term. 

Gillespie on the Location, Construction and Improvement of 

Roads, and Railroads. 
Astronomy — Practical. 
Butler's Analogy; Xatural Theology and Alexander's Evidences 

of Christianity. 
Physical Gcograplty---Guyot. 

The studies of the modern languages are the same as in the 
Scientific Course. 

In addition to the text books prescribed to the students of 
modern languages, they are required to read a prescribed course of 
Literature and write exercises, both by dictation and translation, 
in French and German. 
Physical Geography — Guyot. 



WEST VIB(i /MA UNIVERSITY. 27 



IV. 



MILITARY DEPART M E X T • 

First Year. 

First Term- -Infantry Tactics: School of the Soldier. 
Second Term — Infantry Tactics: School of the Company. 
Third Term — Infantry Tactics: Bayonet Exercises 

Second Year. 

First Term — Infantry Tactics : School of the Battalion. 

Second Term — Cavarly Tactics : Sabre Drill. 

Third Term — Target Practice: Artillery and Small Arms. 

Third Year. 

First Term — Infantry Tactics and Practice. 

Second Term — Artillery Tactics : Field Fortifications. 

Third Term — Target Practice : Heavy and Field Artillery. 

Fourth Year. 

First Term — I n fa ntr} T Tactics : School of the Brigade. 

Second Term — Ordnance and Gunnery. 

Third Term — Advance Guard and Outpost Duty. 

Dress Parades, Reviews, Inspections and Guard Mountings are 
held as often as is deemed expedient throughout the entire course. 

The other studies in this department are those of the Classical 

or the Scientific Department respectively. 



28 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

V. 
AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT. 

The studies of this Department are, at present, embraced in a 
two years' course. Students having creditably completed this 
course, will be entitled to receive a certificate to that effect. 

First Tear. 

First Term. 

Inorganic Chemistry. 
Physics — Solids and Fluids. 
General History. 
French or German (optional.) 

Second Term. 

Organic Chemistry : Zoology. 

English Literature. 

French or German (optional.) 

Third Term. 

Botany and Vegetable Physiology. 

Heat, Magnetism and Electricity. 

Plane Trigonometry. 

Constitution of the United States and ot West Virginia, 

Second Year. 

First Term. 

Analytical Chemistry, Geology, Meteorology. 
Chain and Compass Surveying. 

Second Term. 

Analysis of Soils : Entomology. 



Astronomy. 

French or German (optional.) 



WEST V1RG i NIA UNIVERSITY. 39 

Third Term. 

Allen's Farm Book. 

Gillespie, on Roads and Road Making. 

Political Economy. 

Natural Theology. 

The Subjects for Lectures daring the Coarse, are the following : 

First Year, 

First Term. 

The Chemistry, Structure and Physiology oi Plants. 

On the Water, Atmosphere and Soil as related to Vegetables. 

On Tillage. Draining and Manuring. 

Second Term. 

On Domestic Animals and their Digestion, Respiration, Assimi- 
lation and Excretion. 

On the Composition. Preparation and value of different kinds 
of Food. 

On Milk, Butter, Cheese, Flesh and Wool as Agricultural 
Products. 

Third Term. 

On Horticultural and Kitchen Gardening. 

On the Propagation, Training and Culture of Fruit Trees, the 
Vine, Small Fruits and Vegetables 

Second Year. 

First Term. 

On the staple grain, forage, root and Fibre crops of this and ad- 
joining States, and their varieties, and the best soils adapted 
for them. 
On the preparation of soil, seeding, cultivating, harvesting and 

preparing for market. 
On the Origin and Natural History of Domestic Animals. 
On Entomology and the Insects useiul and hurtful to Vege- 
tation. 



30 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

Second Term. 

On the raising, care, characteristics and adaptation of different 

breeds of Domestic Animals. 
On Cattle for beef or draught, and Sheep for wool or mutton. 
On Horses, Swine and Poultry. 
On Pasturing, Soiling and Stall Feeding. 
On Tobacco, Hops and Forestry. 

Third Term. 

On Eural Economy. 

On the History of Agriculture, with sketches of the same in 

ancient and .modern times ; and in foreign lands. 
On the adaptation of Farming to soil, climate, market, and other 

natural and economical conditions. 
On the different systems of Husbandry, such as stock, sheep, 
grain and mixed farming. 



WEST VIRGINIA l\\ I V IJh'SlTY. 



31 






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32 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 



First Year. 

First Term. 

Geography — Guyot's Common School : Map Drawing 
Arithmetic — Stoddard's Complete. 
English Grammar — Etymology. 
Latin — Commenced. 

Second Term. 

Geography — Guyot continued ; Map Drawing. 
Arithmetic continued. 
Eng. Grammar — Syntax. 
Latin — Grammar and Eeader, 

Third Term. 

Arithmetic — Completed. 

English Grammar — Analysis of Sentences. 

Latin — Grammar and Readers. 

Greek — Bullion's First Lessons. 

Second Year. 

First Term. 

Algebra — Robinson's Elementary, to Involution. 

Book keeping. 

Csesar — Latin Grammar. 

Greek — Grammar and Reader. 

Second Term. 

Algebra — Robinson's Elementary, Completed. 
History of the United States — Anderson's. 
Cicero's Orations — Bullion's ; Latin Grammar. 
Greek — Grammar and Reader. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



Third Term. 

Geometry — Robinson, First Five Books. 
History oi the United States— Completed. 
Virgil — Three Books of /Eneid ; Latin Grammar. 
Xen option's Anabasis; Greek Grammar. 

Regular lessone in Writing, Spelling, Elocution and English 
Composition from beginning. 

The Course preparatory to the Scientific, the Engineering and 
the Military Departments is the same as the above with tho substitu- 
tion of Citizen's Manual, one term, Cutter's Physiol >gy,two t 
and Watts on the Mind, one term, respectively, for the studies 
in Greek 

The studios preparatory to the Agricultural Department are as 

follows : 

First Term. — Algebra; Arithmetic; Grammar; Geography. 
Second Term. — Algebra; Arithmetic; Grammar; History U.S. 
Third Term. — Geometry; Arithmetic; Grammar; History l*. S. 



34 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



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WEST VlIKllX/.l UNIVERSITY. 36 



GENERAL REMARKS. 



Origin of the University. 

The subject of advanced education has been in various forms 
before the people of West Virginia for years, but without any 

liberal provision having been made for the same until quit 
cently. The Constitution of the State makes it the duty of the 
Legislature to '-foster and encourage Moral, Intellectual, Scien- 
tific and Agricultural improvement; and to make provision for 

the organization of Such institutions of learning as the best in- 
terests of general education may demand. The National ('on 
gi ess having donated certain lands 'in order to promote the 
liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the 
several pursuits and professions in life.'* the Legislature accepted 
the same, and appointed a Board to organize the Institution, with 
instructions to ''establish Departments of Education in Literature, 
Science Art. Agriculture and Military Tactics — including a Pre 
paratory Department. 

Endowment and Funds. 

The proceeds of the sale of Congressional lands amounted to 
800,000. The citizens of Morgan town contributed in grounds, 
buildings and money, about $50,000. The Legislature realizing 
the necessity and immense value of such an institution, its incal- 
culable worth to the youth of the Commonwealth and oi the 
country, has increased the endowment to about (110.000, with 
annual appropriations tor current and contingent expenses. As 
no part of the Congressional grant can be applied to the erection 
of buildings (one-tenth only being allowed for the purchase of 



36 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

an experimental farm), the Legislature has also made provision 
for the supply and keeping in order of such buildings as the 
growth of the institution may, from time to time, demand. Every 
interest of AVest Virginia requires that she furnish her sons the 
best possible educational advantages within her own borders. 

Name and Government. 

At the beginning, in common with some other National Colle- 
ges, it was simply called the '"Agricultural College." Having been, 
however, fully adopted by the State, and the means originally 
supplied to aid in its establishment being further supplemented 
by the Legiskrure. an act was passed, pursuant to the recommen- 
dation of the Governor, ordering that it should thereafter be 
known by the style and designation ot -VYest Virginia Uni- 
versity." It is under the immediate oversight of a board of 
nine Regents, one from each judicial circuit, appointed by the 
Srate and required to report annually, through the Governor, 
to the Legislature. The bitterness of partisan and sectarian dis- 
putes is excluded from its Halls, and every effort made to secure 
to each student the full advantage of a broad and manly cul- 
ture. 

Scope. 

This is entirely in accord v ith the original design of the insti- 
tution, as seen in the first paragraph of these '-General Eemarks." 
The act of Congress contemplated the founding of institutions 
that would furnish not only "practical" but also 'liberal educa- 
tion — education kt in the several pursuits" and just as certainly 
"in the several professions" of life. It forbids the exclusion of 
'•classical studies,"' and requires attention to Agricultural and 
Mechanical Education, Military Tactic?, &c, The act of the Leg- 
islature contemplated a school of general instruction, and di 
rected the Board to organize several distinct departments, as 
above enumerated, in the interest of the people of the State and 
of the Nation. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

We trust thai in the extent and in the quality ofit • work, and 
the thoroughness of its discipline and culture, ae well as adaptation 
to the demands of the age, the Universiti will prove itsoll de 
serving of* no .second rate position among the institutions of our 
land. Ii designs, by its instruction in Literature and Art . in 
Language, ancient and modern ; in Mathematics, pure and ap- 
plied; in the Sciences, agricultural, physical, mental, moral and 
social; by its recitations, lectures, examinations and elevating 
influences, to educate, inform and discipline the student's mind; 
lo strengthen his moral principles, and supply such general and 
generous, as well as special, culture as will best prepare him for 
success and usefulness in any pursuit or profession in life. 

Opportunities . Ifforded. 

The work which the University is accomplishing can be 
readily understood from the Courses of Study prescribed in ea< b 
of the Departments as already set forth. 

We call special attention; however, to souk- features of the fol- 
lowing Departments, viz : 

The Agricultural. 

Young men who desire to study only such branches as will en- 
able the Farmer to pursue his calling with intelligence and profit 
will here find, at small expense of time or means, all tiny need 
in the way of a sound, practical education. They arc not requir- 
ed to study any language but their own. nor go in mathematics 
farther than land surveying. Those deficient in elementary 
studies must spend at least one year in Preparatory studies 
fore entering this Department. 

The Military. 

The law provides that four Cadets may be appointed for each 
Judicial Circuit in the State. These arc educated free ot cost 
for tuition, books, stationery, &c. For such as desire a military 
and engineering education, this department i- provided. ( 'adcts, 



38 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

however, are 71 ot limited to this but may pursue their studies in 
any Department of the University, subject to the general regu- 
lations laid down in the Code for the Cadets. Other students 
arc permitted to drill, on condition that they provide themselves 
with the neat and becoming uniform of the Corps. Drill occupies 
one hour on each of four days in the week. The United States 
Government liberally furnishes the special supplies required for 
this department. These are of the latest and most improved 
construction. 

Applicants for admission to the Corps should address the regent 
of the Judicial circuit in which they reside. 

The Preparatory. 

But comparatively few of our young men in West Virginia 
have home advantages for properly and fully preparing them- 
selves to enter upon regular College studies. This Department 
has proved a fruitful source of supply for the higher classes, 
and also the means of maintaining an elevated grade of prelim- 
inary scholarship for admission to them. As the High Schools, 
Academies and Graded Schools of the State increase in number 
and efficiency in the same proportion will the necessity of this 
Department diminish. Meanwhile, and until their increase and 
fuller development, it cannot be dispensed with without lower- 
ing the standard of Collegiate Study proper, or shutting out 
from the advantages of the Institution many of the best and most 
promising young men of the State. Xowhere else can young 
men be better prepared for advanced studies, or, if this is not 
contemplated, accomplish more thoroughly and advantageously 
such studies as are here provided. 

Those who do not contemplate a full course, can also here 
be furnished with instruction in such preparatory studies as they 
may desire to pursue. 

An Optional Course is allowed those students whose special 
tastes or necessities prevent them from graduating in any of the 
regular Departments. Parents and guardians of students who 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. :;:» 



expect to attend the University are, however, earnestly advised 

to direct their studies with a view to entering one of the regular 
Departments. The attention of those who teach in our interme- 
diate schools is also respectfully invited to this suggestion. 

During the Spring Term <>f each year (beginning on the Ias1 
Wednesday of March), unusual facilities are provided tor all who 
may desire, either to take a short and limited courso, or to tit 
themselves tor the higher grades of teaching, clerking, or other 
specialties. All needed assistance in this work being rendered by 
the several Professors of the Universily superior advantages are 
thus afforded to all comers. 

Examinations. 

I. Each student at the close of the Term shall stand a public 
written examination upon all the studies which he has pursued 
during that Term. No student shall he excused lor non-attend- 
ance on such examinations, except upon presentation of a reason 
which may be considered valid by the Faculty. No student who 
may he absent, and not thus excused, shall he allowed to continue 
in connection with the University IT at the close oi any Term 
a student shall have failed to attain a standing of ( ; , on a scale of 
10 owing to a failure in examination, he shall be informed of the 
fact, and he may be allowed to Stand a special examination under 
the same Committee at anytime before the beginning of the 
next College year. 

II. The examination of each class shall be conducted by a 
committee composed of three members of the Faculty, who shall. 
within three days next preceding the examination, select a series 
of questions, not less than nine nor.more than lilteen in number, 
and submit the same in writing to the class at the time of exam- 
ination. 

III. After examination the committee shall examine the pa- 
pers and determine the standing made by each studenl in exam- 
ination, which shall be considered the equivalent of one month's 
standing in recitation. 



40 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



IV. Before a student shall be entitled to enter a higher elass 
he shall, on a scale of 10. have attained a minimum standing of 
6 in each study belonging to his class, which shall be determined 
by the average ot his recitations and examinations. 

V. Students who have not before been at the University should, 
on their arrival, report themselves to the President, and by him 
be assigned to such department and studies as they may desire 
and be prepared to enter. When a regular course of study is 
once adopted the student is not allowed to vary from it. or change 
to another, without permission. 

Expenses. 

Tuition in the Preparatory Department, 85 00 per term. 

11 in other deparments 8 00 " 

Contingent Fee in Preparatory Dep't... 2 00 " 
'• in other departments... 2 00 " 

Boarding. 

The University does not board students. Ample provision for 
this purpose is made in private families of the town and vicinity. 
The cost, including furnished rooms, fuel and everything needed, 
except washing and light, varies from 8!> 50 to 81 00 per week. 
Some board in clubs at still lower rates, varying from 81 50 to 
82 50 per week, according to the style of living adopted. 

Incidental expenses depend on the habits of the student. The 
law prohibits students incurring debts at stores, groceries. &c, 
except on written order of parent, guardian or teacher. Un- 
necessary and lavish expenditures induce not only waste of time 
and means, but neglect of study and formation of bad habits. 
The necessary expenses for the college year of forty-one weeks are 
less here than in any other place, known to us, where the same 
quality of instruction and other equal advantages are furnished. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY \\ 



Prizes. 

The Regent's Prizes— To the student who shall write tho best 
essay upon a given subject, $25. To the student who shall be 
adjudged the best declaimer, $15. These prizes to be awardod 
after public competition, by a committee <>i citizens appoint 
the Faculty. 
These were awarded at the last contest a* follows, viz: 

James V. Martin, Essay $25 00 

B. B. Curry. Declamation 15 00 

Discipline. 

The rules of the University require that every student Bhall 
be in his place at all stated exercises from the opening to the 
close of his connection with the University. A record is kept 

in which are entered the grade of Scholarship of each student, 
his absence from the exercises of the institution, his tardim 
failure in recitation, unless satisfactorily accounted for. An ab- 
stract of this record, is sent at the close «>t each term, to parents or 
guardians, so that they may see what and how their sons and wards 
are studying, and how they stand in scholarship and deportment. 
In case of negligence, irregularity, or other misconduct, the stu- 
dent will be privately admonished and theparentor guardian will 
be informed of the fact. Mere inattention to study will, if persisted 
in. insure dismissal from the University. No student is allowed 
to leave the precincts of the University during term time with- 
out special permission. 

The attention of parents and guardians i> especially called \<> 
the fact that all exercises begin promptly on the day stated in 
the calendar, and that it is essential to the best interests ol the 
>tudent and of his classmates that he be punctually in his place 
from the tiist day of the term till the last. No excuse will be ac- 
cepted for absence unless such absence is unavoidable. It must 
he distinctly understood that students are allowed to enter only 
4 



42 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



on condition that they comply with the rules of the University, 
and apply themselves punctually and without interruption to their 
prescribed studies. College duties once assumed require the stu- 
dent's full lime, and no extra work taken up by himself or im- 
posed by others, and no absence for the mere pleasure of the 
student or his friends can be allowed to interfere with those 
duties. 

Students from abroad, under fifteen years, should have their 
money sent to, and their bills settled by, Prof. F. S. Lyon. Bur- 
sar of the University. 

Religious Instruction and Worship. 

The exercises of each day are opened with reading the Scrip- 
tures, singing and prayer, at which all the students are required 
to be present. They are also required, unless for sufficient reason 
cxcus3d, to attend regularly some place of religious worship on 
the Sabbath, and on all occasions to treat the institutions of reli- 
gion with respect. The institution is entirely free from sectarian 
control or domination. 

In the internal management and practical working of the In- 
stitution, there is not now, and never has been, the slightest de- 
nominational friction. 

It is hoped that the public journals of the. State will take notice 
of this, and correct, so far as they now can, the exceedingly 
erroneous statements in connection with this subject, into which 
so many of them have, somehow, been led. 

Library. 

A respectable beginning towards a University Library has 
been made. About four thousand volumes have been carefully 
selected and placed on its shelves, including not only many 
choice and valuable books of reference, but also standard works 
in the various departments of History, Biography, Theology, 
Agriculture, Arts, Science, and General Literature. 



WEST Vine IMA UNIVERSITY. 



13 



We respectfully request the friend.- of Education to make con- 
tributions to its shelves. In addition to those hitherto granted, 
the following donations have boon received daring the year: 



A--'i. (Secretary Interior. 



Total 



titli:. 

.Journal of Housa of R presentatives 

Executive Documents of House <f Repre- 
sentatives 

Miscellaneous Documents of House of 
R spresentativi s 

Reports ol Committees of House of Rop- 
res ntatives 

Journal of Senate 

(Executive Docum >nts of Senate 

I Miscellaneous " '• 

Reports of Committees of the Senate 

RepoTl of Census of 1870, is: Ses 

('. a-t Survey, 2 l 6 b . 

Executive Documents. 3d Si a 

Senate Miscellaneous Documents 3d des. 

Report of tli<' Commissioner of Ed ica- 
tiou, 1874 

Smiths nian Reports foi 1873 and 1K7I 

Astronomical oi Meteorological Observa- 
ti ms, is::; 

Reportsof Hygiene, Hospitals, Ac* War Department 

1 and Surg'ci] History of the Re- 
bellion* : : 

Cir ul trs i f [nformation of the Bureau of 

Edn ation 

Reportsof U.S. Coast Survey for 18 2.-3,- 

4,-6,-8,-9, 1860-61 ,-7,-8,-0, 1870,-71*... 
Api cixlix s to R ; 'i oris for 18 

65,-68, •• 

The n ol Errors of Observatii a 

Field Work of Seondary I'riangulation*.. 
Nin tv-six valuable Maps and tar - 
Statistical Atlas of U. 8., parts I. and 11. 



Com'r. Education. 

Sup't. Smithsonian Institution. 

Rear Admiral C. H. 1>.%N 



do do 

Department of Interior. 



-Secured through the influence of Dr. Alex. Martin 



Nearly all the weekly journals of the State, the Tri-wcekly 
Wheeling Register, the Daily Wheeling Evening Standard, and 
valuable religious papers of all the leading religious denomina- 
tions, are gratuitously sent to the reading room of the University. 

Museum Apparatus, <\V. 

The University is in possession of apparatus requisite for thor- 
ough illustration of Chemistry and Physics. 

Several valuable articles of apparatus have been obtained for 
the department oi Astronomy and Physics, including a Smith- 
sonian Barometer, by Grreono, of New York; a Sextant, by 
Crichton, of London; and a Clock with Zinc Compensation, by 



U WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

E. Howard & Co., of Boston. A seven ft. Telescope has been 
constructed by John Byrne, of New York. It is equatorially 
mounted with right ascension and declination circles, and is a 
first-class instrument in every respect. 

The department of History has been furnished with a large 
map of the United States, and a fine set of Bretschneider and 
Spruner's Historical Wall Maps, ten in number, from the German 
publishing house of Justus Perthes, of Gotha. Three of White's 
new Maps of West Virginia, have also been provided fo? use in 
different departments of the University. 

The Museum contains extensive Mineralogical, Geological and 
Conchological cabinets, together with many specimens in other 
departments of Natural History. We request all who are inter- 
ested in such matters to send suitable specimens for the museum, 
especiall}' Indian relics, shells, minerals, fossils and alcoholic spec- 
mens of animals. Such donations will be acknowledged and 
carefully labeled with the name of the donor. There are already 
over 2.000 specimens of minerals and fossils, and more than 
2,300 of recent shells. 

The vicinity of the University offers unrivaled advantages 
for the study of practical Geology. Especial attention will be 
paid to this branch. 

The laboratory of Practical Chemistry is in operation. The 
instruction for the present is devoted chiefly to analysis, with its 
application to agriculture. 

United States Signal Station. 

By direction of General Myer, chief Signal officer of the army, 
a signal station has been established at the University for the 
benefit of Commerce, Agriculture and Science. It is, at present, 
in charge of Sergeant L. Dunne, S. S., U. S. Army. Students 
are by this means furnished with special advantages for the study 
of Meteorology and related subjects. The frequent and carefully 
recorded observations taken by means of the most improved in- 






WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



struments will famish accurate and reliable data for, hereafter, 
estimating climatic changes in Weal Virginia. By ibis means 
also the newspapers, B >ards of trade, and river men goner ally, at 
Pittsburgh, Wheeling and Cincinnati, it tbey so desire, can be 
reliably advised of Bpecial movements in the river at tho head of 
navigation. An abstract of the observations at this station for 
the year 1875, is printed at the end of the catalogue. Sergeant 
Dunne also teaches Telegraphy and Signaling. 

Literary Societies. 

There are two of these in connection with the University, sup- 
plied with suitable halls, tastefully furnished, whose exer- 
- in Composition, Reading, Orations. Debate and Criticism 
arc in many respects, of great advantage to the student. They 
also afford facilities for the stinh* of. and acquaintance with 
Parliamentary forms, and the acquisition of business habits Tin- 
authorities of the University will afford every facility for increas- 
ing the accommodations and usefulness of these valuable aux- 
iliaries. 

Location. 

Morgan town, the seat of the University, is beautifully located 
on the right bank of the Monongahela river, Monongalia county, 
West Virginia. The scenery around is exceedingly attractive 
and picturesque. The place has long been famous for its social 
intellectual and moral culture, and general healthful ness. Coachofl 
leave every morning to and from Fairmont, on the Baltimore 
and Ohio Railroad. There is also a daily conveyance between 
Morgan town and On ion town, Pa. Steamboats from Pittsburgh 
arrive every day at Geneva, twelve miles below Morgan town, and 
Congress has made liberal appropriations tor tie- continuance of 
slackwater navigation in the Monongahela as far as Morgantown. 
A place more eligible for the quiet and successful pursuit "f Sci 
ence and Literature is nowhere to be found. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Grounds and Buildings. 

These are well situated, and admirabl}* adapted to the purposes 
of the University. The}' are immediately outside, and within a 
few minutes walk of Morgantown. The grounds command a 
fine view of the village and of the surrounding country as far as 
the western ranges of the Allegheny mountains. The buildings 
aro models of architectural beauty, capacity, solidity and con- 
venient arrangement. In addition to University Hall, the Arm- 
ory has been finished and is now occupied. The central part of 
the new building, for which a liberal appropriation was made at 
the last session of the Legislature, is nearly finished, and will be 
ready for use before the beginning of the next College year. It 
It is expected that the approaching Commencement Exercises 
will be held in its spacious and elegant hall. 



Note.— There have been no licensed taverns nor saloons, in the place for several years 
past. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



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WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, 



MOEGANTOWS. 



1870-7. 




& 



U HEELING: 
W.J. Johnston, Pubuo Pbihtbb, 

1877. 



ft 



& 



CALENDAR 



^ According to an order of the Regents, August 11th, 1875, the Univers- 
ity year includes forty-one weeks, and is divided as before, into three 
terms. 

The Fiest Term begins on the first Wednesday of September and 
continues fifteen weeks. 

There is then an interval of about two weeks including the Christmas 
holidays. 

The Second Term berins on the first Wednesday of January, and the 
Ihied, on the last Wednesday of March. 

The Annual Commencement is on the fourth Thursday of June. 

Prompt attendance at the beginning of each term is very important to 
the student. 



1877. 
June 21st.-Tbur.clay, 9, a. m. -Annual Examination begins. 

22d. -Friday, 7:30, p. M.— Regents' Prize Contest. 

24th.-Sunday, 3, p. M.-Baccalaureate Sermon, by the President. 

25th.-Monday, 7:30, p. M.-Anniversary of the Columbian Literary Society. 

26th.-Tuesday, 7:30 p. M.-Anniversary of the Parthenon Literary Society. 

27th — Wednesday, 7:33 p. M.-Address to the Literary Societies. 

23th. -Thursday, 9 a. m.-Commencement Day. 
September 5th.-Wednesday, 9. a. M.-Examination of Candidates for admission. 

6th.-Thursuay, 9 a. M.-Regular work of 1377-7S begins. 
December ISth.-Tuesday, First Term ends. 

Christmas Vacation of Two Weeks. 
1878. 
January 2d.-Wednesday, 9 a. M.-Second Term begins. 
March 27th.-Wednesd a y._Second Term ends and Third Term begins. 
May 10th.— Friday .-Junior Exhibition. 
June 27th._Thursday._Third Term ends. 

COMMEJj CEMENT. 



S 



WEST VIR1GNIA UN] 



£ 



BOARD OF REGENTS. 



No. of Circuit. 


Name of Regent. 


1 


♦GEO. W. FRANZHEIM, 


2 


L. S. HOUGH, 


3 


CHAS. J. FAULKNER, 


4 


H. S CARR, 


5 


D. D. JOHNSON, 


6 


F. M. CHALFANT, 


7 


H. S. WALKER, 


8 


A. F. MATHEWS, 


9 


ISAIAH BEE, 



ling. 

Martiruburg. 
u Id. 
Reach. 

,t. 
Chart 

burg. 

t, vecton. 



Officers of the Board. 

D. D. JOHNSON, President. 
A. W. LORENTZ, Treasurer, 

GEORGE C. STURGISS, Secretary. 

Executive Committee. 

L. S. HOUGH, Chairman. 
JOHN J. BROWN. 
JESSE J. FITCH. 
DAVID H. CHADWICK. 
HUGH W. BROCK. 

Secretary. 
GEORGE C. STURGISS. 

Superintendent of Grounds and Buildings- 
E. SHISLER 



Deceased. 



o 



4 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



FACULTY AND TEACHERS. 



REV. J. R. THOMPSON, A. M., President. 



Professor of Astronomy and Physics.* 

REV. J. W. SCOTT, D. D., LL.D., Vice-Pkesidext, 

Prof of Mental and Moral Science. 

WM. M. FONTAINE, M. A., 

Prof, of Agriculture, Chemistry and Natural History. 

ROBT. C. BERKELEY, M. A., 

Prof, of Ancient Languages and Literature. 

E. T. C. RICHMOND, Lieut. U. S. A., 

Prof, of Military Science and Mathematics. 

J. W. V. MACBETH, 

Prof of History, Political Economy and Belles Lettres. 

JOHN I. HARVEY, A. M., 

Prof, oj Modern Langnages and Literature. 

F. S. LYON, A. M., 

Principal of the Preparatory Department. 



*The Studies in this Chair have been temporarilv distributed among the other Chairs. 

£> _ & 



WEST VIHi.lMA IM\KK-1TV. .", 



FACULTY— Continued. 

D. B. PUIMN TON, A. M., 
Instructor in Vocal Music and Astiikmt pmtmmi, 

FRANK WOODS, A. B., 

Assistant in Preparatory Department. 

HUGH W. BROCK, M. D. 

Lecturer on Physiology and Hygiene. 

Hox. JOHN A DILLE, A. M., 

Lecturer on Civil and Constitutional I 

Serg't L. DUNNE, Sig. Serv. U. S. A., 

Meteorological Observer and Instructor in Signaling and Telegraphing. 



WM. DANCER, Janitor 



& £ 



6 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



ALUMNI. 
1870. 

Dent, Marmaduke H., A. M. — Attorney-at-Law, Grafton, W. Va. 

1871. 

Dille, Oliver H., M. S. — Attorney-at-Law, Morgantown. 
Jolliffe, Wm. E., A. 31.— Farmer, White Day, W. Va. 

1872. 

Drabell, John H., A. M. — Attorney-at-Law, Des Moines, Iowa. 
McLane, Allen E., A. M. — ( raveler, Baltimore, Md. 

Smith, Benj. \\"., A. M.- rr ; a Li . . Minneapolis, Minn. 

White, Israel C, A. M. — Assistant on Geological Survey of Pennsyl- 
vania, Morgantown. 

1873. 

Babb, Chas. M., A. M.— Farmer, Greenland Gap, W. Va. 

Border, Daniel TV, A. M.— M. D., Kearneysville, W. Va. 

Boughner, Wm. L., M. S.— Merchant, Rowlsburg. 

Brown, James F., A. M.— Cashier Merchants' Nat. Bank, Charleston. 

Bullock, Edmund T.. A. M.~L. L. B., Columbian Law School. 

Harris, John T., M. S.— Journalist, Harrisville. 

Linch, George P., M, S.— Attorney-at-Law, Wheeling. 

McClure. Taylor B., M. S. — Prin. of Lawrence Academy, Louisa, Ky. 

Price, Thomas H., M. S.— M. D., Morgantown. 

Prichard, Wm. T., M. S.— Attorney-at-Law, Fairmont, W. Va. 

Purinton, Daniel B., A. M.— Tutor, W. Va. University, Morgantown. 

Temple, Marcellus L., A. M.— Attorney-at-Law, Osceola, Iowa. 

Waters, James T., A. M.— Attorney-at-Law, Hempstead, L. I., N. Y. 

1874- 

Chadwick, Richard V., A. B.— Merchant, Weston. 

Dean, John S. W. A. B.— Prof. Ancient Languages, Penn. State College. 

Howell, Wm. M., A. B— Union Theological Seminary, New York. 

Jacobs, Thos. P., A. B.— Attorney-at-Law, New Martinsville. 

Lynch, Charles W., A. B.~ Student of Law, Clarksburg. 



/" 



3*" 






WEST VIRGINIA I M\ ERSITY. 



Morax, Ellsworth E., A. B.— N. .1. 

Woods, Feank, A. B. — Tutor W. Va. Univer wn. 

1875. 

Adams, Samuel Shugkbt, A. B.— Medical Student, Wa D. C. 

Dolliver, R. H., A. B. — Attoraey-at-Law, vn. 

Dolliver, J. P., A. B. — Student of Law, «n. 

Golden, Franklin A., B. S. — Teacher u 

Martin, James V., A. B. — Teacher in i 

Peterson, J. J., A. B.— Teacher, Biickhanm mty. 

Purinton, A. L., A. B. — Teacher, I Mil. 

1876. 

Anderson, John C, B. S. — Farmer, Monongalia coun 

Luke II., A. B. — Principal Union School, Kingwood. 
Hubbahd, Harry Dana. B. S. — Journal ing. 

Lb >N, WlLLEY Owens, A. B. — Teacher, .Mineral county. 
Kkmp, Howard Mason, B 

LAIDLEY, Ge >R3E SUMMER3, B. S.— TYi J] tip ll ( 1 :\i Led Sc 

Nash, James Henry, B. S.— Buffalo, Pu1 inty. 

Ramage, Tj .— Attorney-at-Law, Dodd mty. 

Wetzel, Daniel Elliot, A. B. — Burning Springs, Wirt county. 



I 



& 



£ 



&' 



^ 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



UNDERGRADUATES 



Seniors. 



Brown, William Gay Class. 

Dille, Clarence B Class. 

Hawthorne, Joseph H Class. 

Hood, Thomas M Class.. 

Rogers, Daniel R Class.. 

Smith, Everett C Sci.... 

Snively, Harry J Sci 

Steele, John L Class.. 

Stewart, James L Sci 



.'.Kingwood, Preston County. 

.Morgantown. 

.Randall, Monongalia County. 

.Lowsville, Monongalia County. 

.Morgantown. 

.Spencer, Roane County. 

.Grafton. 

.Morgantown. 

.McCoy's Station, Jefferson County, Ohio. 



Juniors. 



Courtney, Alpheus F Sci.... 

Dayton, Alston Gordon Class. 

-Lee, James McMillen Class. 

Morgan, Benjamin S Class. 

Marsh, Enoch Jasper Class. 

Rich, Daniel Class. 



.Randall, Monongalia County. 

.Philippi, Barbour County. 

.Holliday's Cove, Hancock County. 

.Laurel Point, Monongalia County. 

.Morgantown. 

.Laurel Point, Monongalia County. 



Sopho7?iores. 



Chad wick, David Opt... 

Johnston, Walter McDaniel Opt... 

Purinton, George Dana Class. 

Reed, Charles Baguley Opt... 

Sweeney, Andrew Thomas Opt... 

Wade, Spencer Sci.... 



.Morgantown. 

.Union, Monroe County. 

.Morgantown. 

.Wheeling, 

.Wheeling. 

.Morgantown. 



Freshmen. 



Capehart, John Clarence.. 

Davis, L. F 

Davisson, Ithamar 

Fitch, Dorsey Plummer.. 

& 



.Opt St. Albans, Kanawha County 

.Opt North Bend, Tyler County. 

.Opt Webster, Taylor County. 

.Opt Morgantown. 



& 



o 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 11 



PREPARATORY STUDENTS, 



Second Year. 

Ankrom, Samuel Barnett, Slstarsville, Tyler count] . 

Bassell, Burr, La ; " "' county. 

Bland, Meigs, W - uuty. 

i .i. -man. Tl. lor< V M • 

Daviaeon, Floyd Webster, Taylor ceunty. 

Demain, Edward Rigd □ Morgantown. 

Elliott, AdoniramJudson Readaville, Preston county. 

. Billiard Smith town, Monongalia county. 

Hall, Jesse Jasper Morgantown. 

Houston, Wait man Willey Morgantown. 

Kaine, Eliaha Kent Unlontown, Fayette county, Pa. 

Macbeth, Jam.- Edward Morgantown. 

Marsh, Thomas Morgantown. 

Stout, Benjamin Fillmore Bridgeport, Harrison county. 

Water.-, Ge rge Washington Morgantown. 

Wiley, John Weslej Wadestown, Monongalia county. 

Woodford, Alonzo Harvey Pleasant Creek, Barbour county. 



First Year. 



Anderson, William Franklin Easton, Monongalia county. 

Arben»,H.J.W Wheeling. 

Buyers, Luther M BandaU, Manongalla eaunty. 

Brown, Zalmon Kent Morgantown. 

Brown, Samuel Boardman Clinton Furna, e, Monongalia BOttMly. 

Butcher, Charles Tyson Bippon P. 0. Jefferson county. 

Oarr, Charles Edgar : Buffalo, Putnam county. 

Courtney, Dayid Sail *>*&* Monongalls county. 

Cox, Frank Morgantown. 

Everlv, Edward Cloud Randall, >i mtj. 

Fisher, Banford Rosewell L™l ***** Monongalia county. 

i£> -^— & 



B 



12 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



FIEST YEAK— Continued. 

Hall, Elislia Benton Laurel Point, Monongalia county. 

Haymondj George Hiram Morgantown. 

Henry, Charles Oliver Newburg, Preston county. 

Holy held, Clark H Eastou, Monongalia county. 

Hopkins, Charles Ellis Morgontown. 

King, William Jesse Raccoon, Preston county. 

King, Henry Ison Raccoon, Preston county. 

Koontz, Omer Morgantown. 

Lawhead, James Henry : Morgantown. 

Lewellyu, Thomas Ashby Easton, Monongalia county. 

Lorentz, Charles Frederick Morgantown. 

Mapel, Walter P Rosedale, Greene county, Pa. 

Marsilliott, Leonard Ewing Pittsburgh, Pa. 

McColloch, Albert Paull Wheeling. 

McCoy, William Leonard Granville, Monongalia county. 

McRa, Elijah Clinton Furnace, Monongalia county. 

McRa, Thomas Ison Clinton Furnace, Monongalia county. 

Robinson, John Hunter Patters Mineral county. 

Seamon, William Henry Wheeling. 

Shafer, William Clement Morgantown. 

Shafer, Dudley Conn Morgantown. 

Sisler, Lorenzo Dow Stewarttown, Monongalia county. 

Tapp, William Whitfield Maidsville, Monongalia county. 

Tapp, Thomas Hampton , Rosedale, Greone county, Pa. 

Waters, Otis Watson Randall, Monongalia county. 

Ys'eaver, Laishley Easton, Monongalia county. 

Woodford, Cleophas Pleasant Creek, Barbour enmity. 

Yeager, George Garrison Randall, Monongalia county. 



<£ 



& 



s 



Iwin S I 

»n <>)•! 



Hough, Walter 



!. inty. 



; in Thobarn < >\ 

Sci inty. 

Opt ' TV. 

Sci Poinl Marion, Fa] Pa, 



litioned. _ . 

J3 



10 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 



FACULTY. 



Rev. J. R THOMPSON, A. M., 

President. 

F. S. LYOX, A. M., 

Principal. 

E. T. C. RICHMOND, Lieut. U. S. A. 

Commandant of Cadets. 

D. B. PURINTON, A. M., Secretary, 

Instructor in Vocal Music and Assistant.. 

FRANK WOODS, A. B., 
Assistant 



i£l — ft 



WEST VIRGINIA DNIVER8ITT. 



7 : 

15 



EOSTEE OF STATE CADETS. 



Cadet E. J. 31ar.su, First Sergeant. 
Cadet Charles B. JReed. Sergeant 
Cadet Walter M. Johnston. - 



District. 



II. 



III. 



IV. 



V. 



VI. 



Name. 



Rkmabks. 



u Dis- 
CHABGBD. 



.lames M. Lee Present for duty L873. 

Charles B. Reed.. .. Honorably <! : 

Charles E. Grafton.. Present for dim Oct 



Andrew Sweeney 

Vacancy 

Vacancy 



Honorably discharged.. Jan. 3, L877. 



fThomas M.Hood... Prea duty 

John L.Steele Present for •'■ ity Sept. 5, 

J. H. Hawthorne... Present for dn\y Mai 

Present for duty Oct. 18, 



E. J. Marsh 



f Benj. S. Morgan. 
John T. Reed ... 
J. X. Marsh 

] C. T. Butcher.... 

! Lewis Bland 

[ Vacancy 



Claude E. Robinson. 

B. F. Stout 

Daniel Rich 

Win. II. SeamoD 



j Harry J. Snively.... 

George W. Park.... 

j Willey 0. Ison 

'j Samuel B. Ankrom. 

| Vacancy 

1 Vacancy 



Felix C. Pifer 

Burr Bassell- 

id (J. Dayton ... 
Charles E. Hopkins. 
Charles O. Henry... 
Vacancy 



Present for duty • 1, 

Honorably discharged.. Nov. 7, 

at for duty March 20, 

Present for duty - 

Honorably discharged.. Nov. 7. 



L872. 

L875. 
L873. 



Present for duty Sept 9, 

On sick leave March 28, L876. 

Present for duty Nov. 5, L875. 

ut for duty March 30, L877. 



Present for duty ran. 16, 

Honorably discharged.. Sept 4, 

Graduated June 22, 

rch 27, 



Present for duty. 



1874. 
1876. 



Honorably discharged.. Sept 12, 
Honorably discharged.. Nov. L0, 1876. 
Present for duty Sept 4, i s 7.;. 

at for dul ! 777. 

.it for dutv Lpril 



& 



&f 



~® 



16 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSTIY. 



EOSTEE OF CADETS— Continued. 



District. 



VII. 



VIII. 



IX. 



Name. 



Remarks. 



Enlisted and Dis- 
charged. 



f James H. Nash Graduated June 22. 1876. 

I George S. Laidlev... Graduated June 22, 1876. 

j John C. Capehart... Present for duty Oct. 1, 1875. 

] Vacancy 

Vacancy. 

Vacancy 

f Philip A. Dix Honorably discharged.. Sept. 4. 1876. 

I Z. J. Montgomery... Dropped from the roil- Sept. 4. 1876. 

| Walter M. Johnston 'Present for duty Oct. 23, 1873. 

] Vacancy ' 

! Vacancy 

I Vacancy 



I 

f Harry D. Hubbard.. Graduated June 22, 

I A. F. Courtney Present for duty Nov. 5, 

\ I. Davisson..... Present for duty Jan. 5, 



| Bruce L. Keenan. 
[Vacancy 



Present for duty .March 30, 



1876. 
1 875. 

1876. 
1877. 



DisHngu ish ed Co clefs— 1876. 



Name. 


Classical. 


Military. 


James M. Lee 

Charles B. Reed. 


Classical. 


Military. 
Military. 


Charles E Grafton.. 


Classical. 

Classical. 




Thomas M. Hood 


Military. 


John L. Steele .. . ... 


Military. 


Joseph Hawthorne 


Classical. 
Classical. 
Classical. 

Classical. 
Classical. 




E. J. Marsh 


Military. 


Benjamin S- Morgan 




Daniel Rich 




Willey 0. Ison 


Military. 


Harry J. Snively 


Military. 


Alston G. Dayton 


Classical. 




James H. Vash 


Military. 


George S. Laidley 


Military. 


Walter M. Johnston 


Military. 


Harry D. Hubbard 


Military. 


A F. Courtney 


Military. 



*In accordance With regulations established for the government of the Corps, the above 
Cadets are reported as distinguished in the departments opposite their names, by reason of 
having attained a yearly average of 900 and upwards on a scale of 1,000. 

& 



cl. 



$8 

WEST VIRGINIA i NIVER81 I'Y. 13 



RECAPITULATION- 



Seniors, ............ 9 

6 

mores, ........... <; 

a mi. ......... . |fl 

First Preparatory Students, ......... 17 

p uratory Students ........ 

Total, .......... U 



& 



& — — — — — - - ^ 

14 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



MILITARY DEPARTMENT. 



FACULTY 



Rev. J. R. THOMPSON, A. M., 

PRESIDENT. 

E. T. C. RICHMOND, Lieut. U. S. A., 

COMMANDANT. 

Staff. 

Cadet Thos. M. Hood, First Lieutenant and Adjutant. 

Cadet Harry J. Snively, Second Lieutenant and Ord. Officer. 

Commissioned Officers. 

Cadet John L. Steel, Captain. 

Cadet Thos. M. Hood, First Lieutenant. 

Cadet Joseph H. Hawthorne, First Lieutenant. 

Cadet Harry J. Snively, Second Lieutenant. 

Cadet James M. Lee. Second Lieutenant. 



Cadet Alston G. Dayton, Color Sergeant. 



fe__ „ , ^ 3 



%> 



WEST VIRGINIA I \[\ | 



O 



VOCAL MUSIC. 

D. B. PTJEINTON, A. ML [nstki 

Some years ago, the Regents added Vocal Music t<> the Studies of the 
University. It is open, five of charge, to students of all departm 
alike. The course of Instruction embraces one year, as follows: 

Fall Term —Rudiments and Elementary Practii 
Winteb Tebm.— Rudiments continued. < dec and ( Ihorus Singing. 
Spring Ti:::u.— Lectures on Harmony and ition, Chorus, S 

ing, Review, &c. 



Students. 



Anderson, W. F. 
Ankrom, S. B. 
Bassell, B. 
Boyers, I.. M. 
Butcher, C. C. 
Carr. I 

Coleman, T. V. 
*< lourtney, A F. 
•Dayton, A. < r. 
Demain, E. Et 
•Elliott, A. J. 
Hammond, D. E. 
•Hawthorne, .1. II. 
I [aymond, < •• II. 
Holyfield, C. II. 
J [opkins, C. E. 
Lawhead, J. II. 
Lee, J. M. 



lyn, T. A. 

:.'\v. p. 

rsh, H. .1. 
*Marsh, J. N. 
Marsilliott, L E. 
McRa, T. I. 
Morgan, B. S. 
Rich, D. 

p, L. I) 
Shafer, W. C. 
er, D. C. 

Snively, II. J. 

.«■;.). l. 

Stewart, J P. 
Tapp, VY. W. 
Wiley, J, W. 



a 



F *r Practice. 



& 



5? 



1- 



*g 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



TELEGRAPHY CLASS. 



YEAR 187 6- 



L. DUNNE, Serg't, Sig. Serv. I . S. A., Instructor. 



Name. 



lHood, T. M 

2Snively, H. J 

3 Hall, J. J 

4 Grafton, C. E 

5 Hustead, H. F 

6 McCoy, W. L 

THolvfield. C. H 

8 Llewellvn. T. A 

9Carr,C/E 

10 Hopkins. C. L 

11 Yeager, G 

12 Demain, E 

13Ison, H. A 

UShafer, \Y 

15 Marsilliott. L E 

16 Haymond, G 

17 Brown, L 

18 Johnston, W. McD. 

19 Robinson, J. H 

20 Weaver, L 

21 Fitch. D. P 

22Havraond. F. T 



Telegraphy. 



Signaling. 



Telegraphy 

do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



Signals and Meteorology. 



Signals and Meteorology. 



Requisites for Admission. 

I All candidates for admission to any Department of the University, 
must present satisfactory evidence of good Moral character. 

II. Students coming from other Colleges must produce certificates of 
honorable dismission from the same. No person shall be admitted into 
the Senior class after the beginning of the University year. 

III. Those entering as Students for a Degree in any Department of 
the University, must sustain an examination in the various studies of 
the Preparatory School of the University, or t u eir equivalent. 



5T ~ " ® 

W EST V [RG I N [A UNIVERSITY. 1 9 



IV. Candidates for advanced standing must sustain an examination 
in tlif previous studies of the I department which they desire to enter. 

V. The regular exam .. ;,., have 
not pursued the preliminary studies in the Preparatory School of the 
University, will take place on Friday, succeeding Commencement, and 
on the firsi day of the First Term. 

VI Candidates should procure a copy of the printed laws of the Dni- 
versity, also the Treasurer's receipt for tuition, before presenting them- 
selves for enrollment. 

VII Applicants for admission to the Preparatory Department must 
stand an approved examination on (Spelling, reading, writing, modern 
geography, elements of English grammar, and arithmetic through com- 
mon fraction-. 

VIII. Students are required to pronounce Greek and Latin according 

to the so called Continental method. 



ft _ 



20 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



COURSES OF STUDY 



The in&truction thus far provided for in the University is embraced 
in six departments, viz: The Classical, Scientific, Agricultural, Engineer- 
ing, Military ; a~d for those desiring to qualify themselves for regular 
admission to any of these, a Preparatory Department. No study has 
been dropped from any of these departments, but the method of stating 
what is required in each, has been simplified in the present Catalogue. 

I. 

CLASSICAL DEPARTMENT 

The studies in this Department, required for the Degree of Bachelor of 
Arts, are as follows : 

Freshman Year. 

FIRST TEEM. 

Virgil- Bucolics and Georgics; Prose Composition. Gildersleeve's 

Grammar and Exercise Book. 
Herodotus ; Greek Prose Composition and Greek Grammar. 
Universal History — Anderson. 
Universal Algebra — Robinson. 
Elocution . 

SECOND TERM. 

Horace—Odes and Epodes; Latin Prose Composition (continued.) 

Horner— Iliad; Greek Prose Composition (continued.) 

English Literature - Shaw. 

Geometry (completed) ; Solid and Plane Trigonometry (commenced.) 

Elocution. 

THIRD TERM. 

Cicero— De Senectute and De Amicitia ; Exercises in Latin Prose Com- 
position. 
Homer— Iliad : Prose Composition. 
Constitution ot the United States and of West Virginia. 

Plane Trigonometry (Completed) ; Spherical Geometry and Trigono- 
metry. 
Elocution. 

& _JS 



8 

WEST Villi., MA UNIVERSITY. 21 



Sophomore ) ear, 

FIRST TERM. 

: >phoD — Memorabilia; Exercises in Greek 4 >mp 
Rhetoric- -Haven. 

Mensuration ; Surveying; Navigation. 
Chemistry, [norganic,- Eliol andStorer. 

Elocution. 

SECOND TERM. 

Horace — Satires and Epistles; Exercises in Latin. 

Logic— C\>;' 

Composition. 

Analytical Geomery (First Part), and Differential Calculus- Olnej 

Chemistry— Organic. 
Elocution. 

THIRD TERM, 

Livy — Lincoln; Exercises in Latin Composition. 

Plato— Crito and Apology; Exercises in Greek Composition. 

Botany — Gray. 

English Philology— Corson's Syllabus of Philoli 

Elocution. 

Junior Year. 

FIRST TERM. 

Euripides' Alcestis ; or French. 

Mental Philosophy: The Intellect— Haven and Lectures. 

Physics, General PrincipL s — Solids and Fluids. 

Analytical Geometry (Optional ) 

Physical Geography (Guyot. 

SECOND TERM. 

Tacitus— Germania and Agricola; Latin Composition ; or French, 
Mental Philosophy : The Sensibilities and the Will — Haven and Lectures. 
Physics— Pneumatics, Acoustics, Optics. 
Integral Calculus, (Optional.) 
Zoology— Nicholson. 

THIRD TERM. 

Demonsthenes on the Crown, with written Exercises; or French. 

Physics — Heat, Correlation of Forces, Electricity. 

Political Economy — Perry. 

Human Anatomy and Physiology — Dra 

i£___ _ £ 



22 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Senior Year. 

FIRST TEEM. 

Cicero — De Officiis; with Written Exercises on Historical Subjects; or 

German. 
Moral Philosophy — Gregory. 
History of Civilization — Guizot. 
Geology, Lithological, Dynamical and Historical — Dana. 

SECOND TERM. 

Sophocles — CEdipus Tyrannus ; or German. 
Elements of Criticism— Lord Karnes. 
Astronomy, XII. Chapters — Loomis. 
International Law — Woolsey. 

THIRD TERM. 

Tacitus — Annals ; or German, 
Astronomy. (Completed.) 

Butler's Analogy, Natural Theology and Alexander's Evidences of Chris- 
tianity. 

If, in this Department, the student selects the French or German in- 
stead of the Latin or Greek, he shall be required to study them re- 
spectively, during three successive Terms, and such selection must be 
made at the beginning of the Junior or Senior Year. The text books for 
the Junior Year are the same as those of the Scientific Freshmen, and for 
the Senior Year, the same as Junior Scientific. 

II. 

SCIENTIFIC DEPARTMENT. 

The studies in this Department required for the Degree of Bachelor of 
Science are the following : 

Freshman Year. 

EIRST TERM. 

University Algebra -Robinson. 

French — Languellier and Monsanto's French Course. 

Universal History — Anderson. 

Chemistry (Inorganic)— Eliot and Storer. 

Elocution. 

SECOND TERM. 

Geometrv (completed), solid and plane trigonometrv commenced. 

i£> L___ £ 



WEST VIRGINIA [TNIVEB8ITT. 



French — French Course continued ; Smith's French Principia, P 

English Literature— Shaw. 
Chemistry (organic.) 
Elocution. 

THIRD TERM. 

Plane Trigonometry (completed)— Splu-rii-al Geometry and Trigonom- 
etry. 

p ren ch — French Course completed, Principia II., Telemaqui 
renin'-. 

Constitution of the United States and of Wesl Virginia. 

Botany— Gray's School and Field Bopi. 

Elocution. 

Sophomore Year. 

FIRST TERM. 

Mensuration, Surveying and Navigation— Robinson. 
French— Voltaire, Charles XII.. French Grammar and Exercis 
Rhetoric— Haven. 
Physics, General Principles— Solids and Fluids. 

Elocution. 

SECOND TERM. 

Analytical Geometry (First Part) and Differential Calculus. 

Logic— Coppee. 

Chemical Analysis. 

Physics— Undulations, Acoustics, Optics, Problems. 

Elocution. 

THIRD TERM. 

Analytical Geometry (Second Part) and Integral Calculus. 
French— Moliere's Misanthrope, French Grammar and Exercii 
Physics— Heat ; Magnetic, statical and Dynamical Electricity. 
Elocution. 
Chemical Analysis. 

Junior 1 Year. 

FIRST TERM. 

Meteorology— Loomis. 

German— Woodbury's Complete Com 

Mental Philosophy, The [ntellect -Haven, and Lectures. 

Physical Geography, (Guyot.) 

SECOND TERM. 

Analytical Mechanics— Peck. 

German— Grammar continued ; German Reader. 

& - & 



24 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Zoology — Nicholson. 

Mental Philosophy — The Sensibilities and the Will — Haven, and Lec- 
tures. 

THIRD TEEM. 

Analytical Mechanics (Completed ) 

German— Grammar and Free Exercises; Schiller's Jungfrau or Maria 

Stuart- 
Political Economy— Perry. 
Human Anatomy and Physiology — Draper. 

Senior Year. 

FIRST TERM. 

Moral Philosophy — Gregory. 

German — Goethe's Iphigenia in Tauris, or Egmont ; Whitney's Gram- 
mar and Exercises. 
History of Civilization — Guizot. 
Geology — Lithological, Dynamical and Historical — Dana. 

SECOND TERM. 

International Law — Woolsey. 

German — Fouque's Undine ; Whitney's Grammar and Exercises. 

Elements of Criticism — Lord Karnes. 

Astronomy — Descriptive and Physical. 

THIRD TERM. 

Butler's Analogy ; Natural Theology ; Alexander's Evidences of Chris- 
tianity. 

German (Optional)— Evans' German Literature ; Grammar and Exer- 
cises. 

Practical Astronomy — Calculation and Construction of Eclipses, verified 
by the Nautical Almanac. 

Agriculture. 

III. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING. 

The studies in this Departmsnt for the first, second and third years 

are the same as in the Scientific ' Course. For the Senior year they are 

as follows : 

FIRST TERM. 

Civil Engineering — Mahan. 
Moral Philosophy — Gregory. 

£> . & 



2? 

WEST VIRGINIA i \i\ BBS] n 



Geology— Lithological, Historical and Dynamical Dana G 

l'.Xfi '( 

SECOND TERM. 

Physical Geography (Guyot.) 
Military Engineering — Mahan. 
Astronomy — Descriptive and Physical. 
International Law — Woolsey. 
Elements ol Criticism— -Karnes. 

THIRD TERM. 

Gillespie on the Location, Construction and [mprovemenl of R 

Railroads. 
Astronomy— Practical. 
Butler's Analogy; Natural I and Alexander'** Evidence* 

Christianity. 
The studies of the modern languages are the same us in the Scientific 

Con- 
In addition to the text books prescribed to the students of modern 
languages, they are required to read a prescribed course of Literature 
and write exercises, both by dictation and translation, in French and 
German. 

IV. 

MILITARY DEPARTMENT. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term — Infantry Tactics: School of the Soldier. 
Second Teem — Infantry Sc »1 of the Company. 

Third Term — Infantry Tactics: Bayonel Exerci 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term — Infantry Tactics : School of the Battalion. 

Second Term — Cavaily Tactics: Sabre Drill. 

Third Term— Target Practice: Artillery and Small Arms. 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Term — Infantry Tactics and Practice. 

vtd Term — Artillery Tactics): Field Fortificati 
Third Term— Target Practice: Heavy and Field Artillery. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

Fn>i Term— Infantry Tactics: School of the Brigade. 

Second Term — I Ordnance and < tannery. 

Third Term— Advance Guard and Outpost Dutj . 



£ 



| 26 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Dress Parades, Reviews, Inspections and Guard Mountings are held 
as often as is deemed expedient throughout the entire course. 

The other studies in this department are those of the Classical or the 
Scientific Department respectively. 

V. 

AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT, 

The studies of this Department are, at present, embraced in a two 
years' course. Students having creditably completed this course, will 
be entitled to receive a certificate to that effect. 

First Year. 

FIRST TERM. 

Inorganic Chemistry. 
Physics— Solids and Fluids. 
General History. 
French or German (optional.) 



SECOND TERM. 



Organic Chemistry : Zoology. 

English Literature. 

French or German (optional.) 

THIRD TERM, 

Botany and Vegetable Physiology. 

Heat, Magnetism and Electricity. 

Plane Trigonometry. 

Constitution of the United States'and of West Virginia. 

Second Year. 

FIRST TERM. 

Analytical Chemistry, Geology, Meteorology. 
Chain and Compass Surveying. 

SECOND TERM. 

Analysis of Soils: Entomology. 

Astronomy. 

French or German (optional.) 

&- . ft 



WEST 7IRIGNIA I NIVER8IT1 . U~ 



THIRD TERM. 

Allen's Farm Book. 

Gillespie, on Roads and Road Making. 

Political Economy. 

Natural Theol 

The Subjects for Lectures during the Course, arc the following: 

First Year. 

FIRST TERM. 

The Chemistry, structure and Ph; Plants. 

On the Water, Atm getables, 

Ob Tillage, Draining and Manuring. 

SECOND TERM. 

On Domestic Animals and their Digestion, Respiration, Assimilation 
and Excretion. 

On the Composition, Preparation and value of different kinds of V I. 

On Milk, Butter, Cheese. Flesh and Wool as Agricultural Prodi 

THIRD TERM. 

On Horticultural and Kitchen Gardening. 

On the Propagation, Training and Culture of Fruit Trees, the Nine. 
Small Fruits and Vegetables. 

Second Year. 

FIRST TERM. 

On the staple u r rai; , root and Fibre crops of this and adjoining 

States, and their va] - - (, ''! s adapted for them. 

On the preparation of Boil, seeding, cultivating, harv< I prepar- 

ing for market. 

On the Origin and Natural History of Domestic Ani 

on Entomology and the [nsecfc useful and hurtful to Vegetation. 

SECOND TERM. 

On the raising, care, characteristics and adaption of different breeds oi 

Domestic Animals. 
On Cattle for beef or draught, and Sheep for wool or mutt 
( )n Horses, Swine and Poultry. 
On Pasturing, Soiling and stall Feedu 
On 1 Hops and Fore-- 

3> £ 



28 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



THIRD TERM, 

On Rural Economy. 

On the History of Agricultural, with sketches of the same in ancient 

and modern times: and in foriegn lands. 
On the adaptation of Farming to soil, climate, market and other natural 

and economical corditions. 
On the different systems of Husbandry, such as stock, sheep, grain and 

mixed farming. 



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WEST VIRGINIA I M\ ER8ITT 



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30 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. I 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 



First Year. 

.FIRST TERM. 

Geography— Guyot's Common School ; Map Drawing. 
Arithmetic— Stoddard's Complete. 
English Grammar— Etymology. 
Latin — Commenced. 

SECOND TERM. 

Geography— Guyot continued ; Map Drawing. 
Arithmetic continued. 
English Grammar — Syntax. 
Latin — Grammar and Reader. 

THIRD TERM. 

Arithmetic— Completed. 
English Grammar— Analysis of Sentences. 
Latin— Grammar and Headers. 
Greek— Bullion's First Lessons. 

Second Year. 

FIRST TERM. 

Algebra— Robinson's Elementary, to Involution. 

Book-keeping. 

Caesar — Latin Grammar. 

Greek — Grammar and Reader. 

SECOND TERM. 

Algebra— Robinson's Elementary, Completed. 
History of the United States— Anderson's, 
Cicero's Orations -Bullion's Latin Grammar. 
Greek— Grammar and Reader. 

THIRD TERM. 

Geometry— Robinson, First Five books. 



_<$ 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVEB8ITT. 31 



History of the United States— Completed. 
Virgil — Three Books of /Eneid; Latin Grammar. 
Xenophon's Anabasis ; Greek Grammar. 

ns in Writing, Spelling, Elocution and English I 
tion from beginning. 

The course preparatory to the Scientific, the I ring and the 

Military Departments is the Bame as the above with the Bubstitutiei 
Citizen's Manual, one term, Cutter's Physiology, two terms, and W 
on the Mind one term, respectively, for the - 

The studies preparatory to the Agricultural Departmen 

follows : 

First Term — Algebra; Arithmetic; Grammar; Geography. 
ndTerm — Algebra; Arithmetic; Grammar; History I 
Third Term — Geometry; Arithmetic; Grammar; History U. 8. 



& & 



& 



32 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



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WKst VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



GENERAL REMARKS. 



OKIGIN OF THE UNIVERSITY. 

advanced education has been, in vario 
the people of West Virginia for years, bul without any libera] provi 
having been made I te until quite recently. The Constitution of 

the State makes ii the duty of the Legislature to " foster and i 
Moral, Intellectual, Scientific and Agricultural improvement; and to 
make provision for the ! such Institutions of learning 

the best interests of general education may demand." The National 
Cong tian lands "in order to promote the liberal 

and practical education of the industrial classes in the several purs 
and professions in life," t ; i accepted the same, and ap- 

pointed a Board to organize the Institution, with instructs 
lish Departments of Education in Literature, Science, Art, Agricul 
and Military Tactics— including a Preparatory Department." 

ENDOWMENT AND FUNDS. 

The proceeds of the sale of • Dal "lands amounted to c 

The citizens of Morgantown contributed in grounds, buildings and 
money, about $50,000. The Legislature realizing th< I im- 

mense value of such an Institution, its incalculable worth to the youth 
of the Commonwealth and of the country, has increased the endowment 
to about $110,000, with annual appropriations for currenl and con tin j 
enses. As no part of the Congressional grant can he applied to 
erection of buildings (one-tenth only being allowed for the purchase of 
• xperimentai farm), the Legislature o made provision for the 

supply and keeping in >rderof Buch buildings as the growth of th< 
stitution may, from time to time, demand. Every interest 
ginia requires that she furnish her sons the besl possible educati 
advantages within her own borders. 

fo . £ 



NAME AND GOVERNMENT. 

At the beginning, in common with some other National Colleges, it 
was -imply called the "Agricultural College." Having been, however, 
fully a 1 opted by the State, and the means originally sup -lied to aid in 
its establishment being further supplemented by the Legislature, an act 
was passed, pursuant to the recommendation of the Governor, ordering 
that it should thereafter be known by the style and designation of 
"West Virginia University." It is under the immediate oversight of 
a Board of twelve Regents, one from each Senatorial district, appointed 
by the State and required to report annually, through the Governor to 
the Legislature. The bitterness of partisan and sectarian disputes is 
excluded from its Halls, and every effort made to secure to "each student 
the full advantage of a broad and manly culture. 

SCOPE. 

This is entirely in accord with the original design of the institution, 
as seen in the first paragraph of these "General Remarks " The act of 
Congress contemplated the founding of institutions that would furnish 
not only ''practical" but also "liberal education"— education "in the 
several pursuits" and just as certainly " in the several professions" of life. 
It forbids the exclusion of "classical studies," and requires attention to 
Agricultural and Mechanical Education, Military Tactics, etc. The act 
of the Legislature contemplated a school of general instruction, and 
directed the Board to organize several distinct departments, as above 
enumerated, in the interest of the people of the State and of the Nation. 

We trust that in the extent and in the quality of its work, and the 
thoroughness of its discipline and culture, as well as well as adaptation 
to the demands of the age, the University will prove itself deserving of 
no second rate position among the institute >ns of our land. It designs, by 
its instruction in Literature and Art ; in Language, ancient and modern ; 
in Mathematics, pure and applied; in the Sciences, agricultural, physi- 
cal, mental, moral and social; by its recitations, lectures, examinations 
and elevating iniiuences, to educate, inform and discipline the student's 
mind ; to strengthen his moral principles, and supply such general and 
generous, as well as special, culture as will best prepare him for success 
and usefulness in any pursuit or profession in life. 

OPPORTUNITIES AFFORDED. 

The work which the University is accomplishing can be readily un- 
derstood from the Courses of Study prescribed in each of the Depart- 
ments as already set forth. 

We call special attention, however, to some features of the following 
Departments, viz: 

& ® 



3T ~~ '1 

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



THE AGRICULTURAL. 

Young men who desire to study only Biich branches as will enable the 
Farmer to pursue his calling with intelligence and profit will heir tin-!, 
i. ill expense of time or means, all they need in the way of ■ sound, 
practical education. They are not required to study any language but 
their own, nor go in mathematics farther than land sun eying. Ti 
icent in elementary studies must spend at leasl one year in I 
ry studies before entering this Department. 

THE MILITARY. 

The law provides that four Cadets may be appointed for each Judicial 

Circuit in the state These are educated free of cosl for tuition, books, 

r such as desire a military and engineering education, 

this department is provided however, are not limited to this, 

but may pursue their studies in any department of the University, sub- 
ject to the general regulations laid down in the Code for the Cadets. 
Other - permitted to drill, on condition that they provide 

themselves with the neat and becoming uniform of the Corps. Drill oc- 
cupies one hour on each of four days in the week. The United Si 
irnment liberally furnishes the special supplies required for this de- 
aent. These are of the latest and most improved construction. 
Applicants for admission to the Corps should address the regent of the 
Judicial Circuit in which they reside. 

THE PREPARATORY. 

But comparatively fe v of our young men in West Viaginia have home 
advantages for properly and fully preparing themselves to enter upon 
• studies. This Department has proved a fruitful Bource 
upply for the higher classes, and also the means of maintaining an 
elevated grade iholarship for admission to them, la 

the High Academic- and Graded Schools of the State inc 

in number and efficiency, in the same proportion will the Decessity of 
this Department diminish. Meanwhile, and until their increase and 
fuller development, it cannot he dispensed with without lowering the 
standard er, or shutting out from theadvant 

of the Institution many of the best and most promising young men of 
the State. Nowh can young men he better prepared for ad- 

vanced studies, or, if this is no! contemplated, accomplish more thor- 
;d advantageously such studies as are here provided. 
Those who do not contemplate a full course, can also here he furnished 
with instruction in such preparatory studies as they may desireto pur- 
sue. 

illowed those Btudents win-'' special I 
■ them fron 

$ 



cl 



36 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



ments- Parents and guardians of students who expect to attend the Uni- 
versity are, however, earnestly advised to direct their studies with a 
view to entering one of the regular Departments. The attention of those 
who teacli in out intermediate schools is aLso respectfully invited to this 

stion. 
i] ing the Spring Term of each year (beginning on the last Wednes- 

>f March), unusual facilities are provided for all who may desire, 
either to take a short and limited course, or to lit themselves for the 
higher grades of teaching, clerking, ©r other specialties. All needed as- 
sistance in this work being rendered by the several Pro r essors of the 
University, superior advantages are thus afforded to all comers. 

NOBMAli INSTRUCTION. 

During each Term classes are formed in the Theory and Practice of 
Teaching, under the charge of an able and experienced instructor. Lec- 
tures are from time to time delivered before the class by the several 
members of the Faculty. The daily contact of the students in the class- 
room with their teachers, observing their methods and studying their 
plans, affords fine opportunities in this department of instruction. 
Nowhere in the State are afforded better facilities for practical Normal 
drill A reference to the present occupations of our Alumni in the 
former part of this catalogue, will show the positions, as teachers, our 
graduates are enabled immediately to secure and retain. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

I. Each student, at the close of the Term, shall stand a public written 
examination upon all the studies which he has pursued during that 
Term No student shall be excused for non-attendance on such exami- 
nations, except upon presentation of a reason which may be considered 
valid by the Faculty. No student who may be absent, and not thus ex- 
cused, shall be allowed to continue in connection with the University. 
If at the close of any Term a student shall have failed to attain a stand- 
ing of 6, on a scale of 10 owing to a failure in examination, he shall be 
informed of the fact, and he may be allowed to stand a special exami- 
nation under the same Committee at any time before the beginning of 
the next College year. 

II. The examination of each class be conducted by a committee com- 
posed of three members of the Faculty, who shall, within three days 
next preceding the examination, select a series of question, not less 
than nine nor more than fifteen in number, and submit the same in 
writing to the class at the time of examination. 

III. After examination the committee shall examine the papers and 
determine the standing made by each student in examination, which 
shall be considered the equivalent of one month's standing in recitation. 

& £ 



s? £ 

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



IV. Before a student shall be entitled to enter a hig hall, 
on a scale of 10, have attained a minimum standing 
belonging to his class, which shall be d< termined bj 
recitations and examinations. 

V. who have no1 
their arrival, report themseb and by hi 

ach department and studies as thi id to 

r. When a regular 
not allowed to vary from it, or ch »n. 

TUITION. 

Tuition in the Preparal per term. 

" in other departments SCO 

Contingent Fee in Preparatory Dep't 

" •■ in other 1 depar 2 00 

BOARDING AND EXPENSES. 

The University does not board students. Ai 'his 

purpose is made in private families of the 
including furnished rooms, fuel and everything 
and light, varii I 00 per we ard in clul 

still lower rates, varying from $1 2 50 per i \ to 

the style of living adopted; 

Incidental expenses depend on the habitsof the Btudeni The law 
prohibits students incurring debts at 
written order of parents, guardian or I 

expenditures induce not only wa ■ • and means, but i 

study and fori tation of bad hi 

- for the c 
here than in any « i us, wher lity of in- 

struction and i J advant; irnished. 

PRIZES. 

Tin- Regent's Prize.— To the stud< dj wh i shall write I 
upon a '.riven subj< ' the 

best declaimer, $15. Th( 

by a committee of citi» □ ited by the Faculty. 

These were awarded I t the 

Benjamine S. Morj 

I. Davisson, Declamation 

DISCIPLIIN 

The rules of the University require tha '" '' ;< 

' place ai all stated exercises from the opening to the close of h 

& & 



5T -^ 



°8 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



tion with the University. A record is kept in which are entered the 
grade of Scholarship of each student, his abscence from the exercises 
of the institution, his tardiness, or failure in recitation, unless satisfac- 
torily accounted for. An abstract of this record, is sent at the close of 
each term, to parents or guardians, so that they may see what and how 
their sons and wards are studying, and how they stand in scholarship 
and deportment. In case of negligence, irregularity, or other miscon- 
duct, the ..ill be privately admonished and the parent or guar- 
dian will be informed of the fact. Mere inattention to study will if 
persisted in, insure dismissal from the University. No student is' allowed 
to leave the precincts of the University during term time without 
special permission. 

The attention of parents and guardians is especially called to the fact 
that all exercises begin promptly on the day stated in the calendar, and 
that it is essential to the best interest of the student and of his class- 
mates that he be punctual in his place from the first day of the term till 
the last. No excuse will be accepted for absence unless such absence is 
unavoidable. It must be distinctly understood that students are allowed 
to enter only on condition that they comply with the rules of the Uni- 
versity, and apply themselves punctully and without interruption to 
their prescribed studies. College duties once assumed required to stu- 
dent's lull time, and no extra work taken up bv himself or imposed by 
others, and no absence for the mere pleasure of the student or his 
friends can be allowed to interfere with those duties. 

The government of the students proceeds upon an entirely Christian 
basis. Kindness, gentleness and trust fulness are relied upon rather 
than sternness, impatience and suspicion. In such an atmosphere 
all noble and manly qualities ripen, and students learn to demean them- 
selves as Christian gentlemen. Students are encourged and incited to 
form habits ot economy, industry, self-reliance, truthfulness and purity 
and thus to become a law unto themselves. 

RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTION AND WORSHIP. 

The' exercises of each day are opened with reading the Scriptures 
singing and prayer, at which ad the students are required to be present' 
Ihey are also required, unless for sufficient reason excused, to attend 
regularly some place of religious worship on the Sabbath, and on all oc- 
casions to treat the institutions of religion with respect. The institution 
is entirely free from sectarian control or domination. 

In the internal management and practical working of the institution 
here is not now., and never has been, the slightest denominational 
tnction. 

LIBRARY. 

A respectable beginning towards a University Library has been made. 
I About four thousand volumes have been carefully selected and placed on 



& 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVEB 



8 



its shelves, including, not only many choice and valuable b 
but also standard works in the various de] 
tphy, Theology, Agriculture, Ai:-. - 
We respectfully request the friends i [ Ed itribu- 

tionsto its shelves. In addition to those hither! 
ing donations have been receh ;d during 



Vol.S. 



TlTLK. 















aborg's Works 

Memorial Address a — A. Johnson 

O. J. Ferry 

" Henry \\ uson 

Washington Astronomical and M 

cal Observations 

Draining of LakeTicino, with maps 

'. B scord 

rvey 

Smithsonian Contributions to Know] ■ 
Smithsonian Reports for 1- 

Congressional Directory 

-and Documents 

of Commissioner of Education 

Department of Agriculture " 

Executive Do* uments " 

Report of Committees — Affairs in Alabama.. '• 
House Journal, 2d S 
" " " " 

Senate " 2d S " " 

<< K (i it 

Report of Committees— Alien Claims " 

" Secretary of Interior " " 

" " " Navy vy. 

" Comm 

.. 

Hand J'. 

The Empire of Brazil at I Ex- 
position, Philadelphia, 1876 

Finance Report, 1876 

1 Historj • 
lion— Part II 

Beportof the Comptroller of Currencj 

I " " ; ' olumbia 

: Reporl on Public Libraries A s ry of the In! 

.. 

lllnstr : thibi- 

tion, bj 1 Lough. 

the United S 



of War 

Reports, Vol. Vll Hon. C. lidriek. 

Exposition 

Histor; ( i Free Trade in Tuscany 

Official Gazette of U. S. Patent Offi 

i 

Official Gaz< 

L876 

I 

Nautical Almanac for L870-77-78-79 

Centennial Album Agricultural Department. 



Total 103. 



rly all the weekly journals of the State, the Tri-weekly Wheeling 
. the Daily Wheeling \ mdard, and valuab 

papers of all the leading religious denominate 

to the reading room of the University " 

® . E 



40 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



MUSEUM, APPARATUS, &c. 

The University is in possession of apparatus requisite for thorough 
illustration of Chemistry and Physics. 

Several valuable articles of apparatus have been obtained for the 
departmert of Astronomy and Physics, including a Smithsonian Baro- 
meter, by Greene, of New York ; a Sextant, by Crichton, of London ; 
and a Clock with Zinc Compensation, by E. Howard & Co., of Boston. 
A seven ft. Telescope has been constructed by John Byrne, of New 
York. It is equatorially mounted with right ascension and declination 
circles and is a first-class instrument in every respect. 

The department of History has been furnished with a large map of 
the United Staies, and a fine set of Bretschneider and Spruner's Histo- 
rical Wall Maps, ten in number, from the German publishing house of 
Justus Perthes, of Gotha Three of White's new Maps of West Vir- 
ginia, have also been provided for use in different departments of the 
University. 

The Museum contains extensive Mineralogical, Geological and Con- 
chological cabinets, together with many specimens in other departments 
of Natural History- We request all who are interested in such matters 
to send suitable specimens for the museum, especially Indian relics, 
shells, minerals, fossils, and alcoholic specimens of animals. Such do- 
nations will be acknowledged and carefully labeled with the name of 
the donor- There are already over 2,000 specimens of minerals and 
fossils, and more than 2,300 of recent shells. 

CENTENNIAL GIFTS. 

The University has received important additions to its cabinets 
in the shape of minerals, coals, woods, building stones, etc., all derived 
from the State of West Virginia, and being a part of her exhibit at the 
Centennial Exhibition. This will be very useful as illustrating in part 
of the resources of the State. 

It has also received from Mr. Zephaniah Myers, of Black Hawk, 
Colorado, an interesting suite of gold and silver bearing ores, collected 
from a number of mines in that State. 

The following specimens have been presented to the University: 

A specimen of Lava, from the Lava Beds of Montana, by Dr. Joseph 
McLane. 

Stuffed White Weazel, by J. Plummer Fitch. 

Two specimens of Moss Agate, by Miss Ella Fordyce. 

A Copperhead Snake, in alcohol, by J. M. Lee. 

A stuffed Rattlesnake, by Richard Loor. 

A Beetle, from Tyler county, by Col. D. D. Johnson. 

A Horned Frog, from Colorado, and a Cecropia Moth and Cocoon, by 
Hon. Geo. C. Sturgiss. 

Indian Dress and Equipments, by Col. J. Lowry McGee 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. H 



The vicinity of the University offers unrivalled advantages for the 
study of practical Geology. Especial attention will be paid to this 
branch. 

The labratory of Practical Chemistry is in operation. The instruction 
for the presenl is devoted chiefly to analysis, with its application t 
riculture. 

UNITED STATES SIGNAL STATION- 

By direction of General Myer, Chief Signal Officerof the Army 
nal -i at ion has been established at the University for the benefit of Com- 
merce, Agriculture and Science. It is, at present, in charge of Sergeant 
1 Dm - S., U. S. Army. Students are by this means furnished with 
special advantages for the study of Meteorology and related Bubjects. 
The • and carefully recorded observations taken by means of the 

most improved instruments will furnish accurate and reliable data for, 
hereafter, estimating climatic changes in West Virginia. By this means 
also, tie* newspapers, boards of trade, and river men generally, at P 
burgh, Wheeling and Cincinnati, it' they bo desire, ••an be reliably ad- 
vised of special movements in the river at the head of navigation. An 
abstract of the observations at this station for the year L875. is printed it 
the end of the catalogue. Sergeant Dunne also teaches Telegraphy and 
Signaling. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are two of these in connection with the University, supplied 
with suitable halls, tastefully furnished, whose exercises in Composition i 
Beading, Orations, Debate and Criticism are, in many respects, of great 
advantage to the student. They also afford facilities for the study of and 
acquaintance with Parliamentary forms, and the acquisition of business 
habits. The authorities of the University will afford every facility for 
increasing the accommodation and usefulness of these valuable auxilia- 
ries 

LOCATION. 

Morgantown, the seat of the University, is beautifully 'located on the 

right bank of the Monongahela river, Monongalia county, West Virginia 

The scenery around is exceedingly attractive and picturesque. The 

place ^ been famous for its social, intellectual and moral culture, 

and u r, 'i. Fulness Coa< - leave every morning to and from 

Fairmont and Ohio Railroad. There is also a daily 

I conveyance between Morgantown and Uniontown, Pa Steamboats 

; from Pittsburg arrive every day at Geneva, twelve miles »rgan- 

| town, and i ■ - made liberal appropriations for the continuance 

of 3lackw •' • navagation in the Monongahela as i.n- .1- Morgantown. A 

place more eligible for the quiet and successful pursuit of Science and 

Literature is nowhere to be found. 



42 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 

These are will situated, ano admirably adapted to the purposes of the 
University. They are immediately outside, arid within a few minutes 
walk of Morgantown. The grounds command a fine view of the village 
and of the surrounding country as far as the western ranges of the 
Allegheny mountains. The buildings are models of architectural beauty 
capacity, solidity and convenient arrangement. In addition to Universi- 
ty Hall, the Armory has been finished and is now occupied. The central 
partoi the new building has, also, been finished, and the approaching 
Commencement Exercises will be held in its spacious and elegant Hall 




5* 



WEST VIRGINIA I M\ KKSITY 



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44 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



^ 



£> 






& ._ 



- eg * fi 



5 £ 'i b £ 



b ... o 



— -t. m 



^^-^>r-£s2 



s £ 



^ x 5 ft O 



8 I 



s^- 



T£ 



^tALOGo 



£ 



OF 



til 




t 

est pirginia |ftniit*rm% 



For the Tears 1878-70. 




& 



WHEELING 
W. J. JOHWSTOK, Pi Bl H l 



& 






According to an order oi the Regents, Angusl llth, 1875, 
ilio University year includes forty-one weeks and is divided as 
before, into three tonus. 

The First Term begins on the first Wednesday oi Septem- 
ber, and continues fifteen weeks. 

There is then an interval oi about two weeks including the 

Christinas holiday-. 

The Ski ond Tkkm begins on the tirst Wednesday of January, 
and the Third, on the Last Wednesday of March. 

The Annual Commencement ie on the Fourth Thursday oi 
June. 

Prompt attendance at the beginning of each term is very 
important to the student 



June -20th. — Thursday, 9 a. m.— Annual Examination begins. 
21st.— Friday, 7:30 p. m.— Regents' Prize Contest 
23d. — Sunday, 3 p. m.— Baccalaureate Sermon, by the President 
24th. — Monday, 7:30 p. m.— Reunion oi class of L873. 
25th.- Tuesday, 7:30 p. m.— Annual Meeting oi West Virginia 

Historical Society. 
26th. - Wednesday, 7:30 p. m,— Address to the Literary Societies. 
27th.— Thursday, 9 a. m . — Commencement Day.— 7:30 p. >i. 
Public Contest oi the Literary Societies. 
September 4th. — Wednesday, 9a. k.— Examination oi Candida 
admission. 
5th. — Thursday, 9 a. m. — Regular work oi 1878-.79 begins. 
December 17th. Tuesday.— First Term ends. 

Christmas Vacation ol Two Weeks. 
L879. 
January 1st— Wednesday, ( > a. m.— Second Term begins. 
March 25th.— Tuesdi id Term cuds. 

March 26th.— Wednesday— Third Term begins. 
May 9th.— Friday. Junior Exhibition. 
June 26th.— Thursday.— Third Terms ends. 

COMMENCEMENT. 



& £ 



.sr~ ■ *a 

4 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Utoitxti of Hegettls* 



No of Dist. Name of Regent. P. 0. Address. 

1 B. W. Allen, Wheeling. 

2.. James Morrow, Jr., Fairmont. 

3 M. S. Hall, Harrisville. 

4 D. D.Johnson, Long Reach. 

5 James B. Stewart Raymond City. 

6 H. S. Walker, Charleston. 

7. H. C. Simms, Huntington. 

8 A. F. Mathews, .Lewisburg. 

9 T.J. Farnsworth, Buckhannon. 

. 10 II " / ^SLA Morgantown. 

11 John A. Robinson, .Patterson's Creek. 

12 D. B. Lucas, Charlestown. 



Officers of the Board, 



-, President. 



A. W. LORENTZ, Treasurer. 
GEORGE C. STURGISS, Secretary, 

Executive Committee. 

Chairman. 
JOHN J. BROWN. 
JESSE J. FITCH. 
DAVID H. CHADWICK. 

Secretary. 
GEORGE C. STURGISS. 



Superintendent of Grounds and Buildings. 
E. SHISLER. 

& ^ 8 



5? 8 

WEST VIRGINIA i m\ 



: -\ tzchzvz. 



REV. J. R. THOMPSON, A. M 
Pi 

F. S. LYON. A. ML, Vice-Pi 
Pro/, o/ History, P< 

WM. ML FONTAINE, fcL A. 

Pro/', o/ .1ot''< < 

ROBT. C. BEEKBLEY, ML A.. 

Pro/, o/ Ancient Languages i 

JOHN I. HARVEY, A. M . 

Pro/", o/' Modem Langua 

ISRAEL 0. WHITE, A. M.. 
Prof, of Astronomy and Natural 

JAMES M. LXGALLS. Lieut. U. S. A 
Pro/, of Milita 

A. W. LOEENTZ, A. M.. 

*E. T. C. Richmond, Lieut. U. S. A., occu] onli] the beginning «f tha 

second term. 



a 



o 



5f ~® 

WEST VTRttTVI A TT\ T 1 VV.RsUTV 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



FACULTY— Continued. 

I). B. PURINTON, A. M., 
Instructor in Vocal Music and Assistant in Preparatory Department. 

JAMES S. STEWART, B. S., 
Assistant in Preparatory Department. 

HUGH W. BROCK, M. D., 
Lecturer on Physiology and Hygiene. 

HON. JOHN A. DILLE. A. M., 
Lecturer on Civil and Constitutional Law. 

SERG T L. DUNNE. Sig. Serv. U. S. A. 
Meteorological Observer and Instructor in Signaling and Telegraphing. 



m 



Hon. CHAKLES J. FAULKNER, 
Rev. W. K. PENDLETON. D.D. 
Hon. CHARLES DA VIES. 
Hon. WAITMAN T. WILLEY, 

O. S. LONG. 

Hon. B. F. MARTIN. 

Rev. J. D. MOFFAT. A. M. 

Rev. A. C. GEORGE, D.D. 



I WM. DANCER, Janitor. 

® . £ 



& 5S 



\ UNIVEl 



^-Mnnmi 



AST". 

Dim, Marmaduke II.. A. M.— Attoraey-at-L 

181 I. 

Dili i:, Oliver B., M. B. Farmer, Morgantown. 
Jolliffe, Wm. E., A. M. Farmer, Wlnir D . W 

IS, 

Drabell, .Iohx II.. A. M.- Attorney-at-Law, Dea Moin 

M< Lane, Allen E., A. M. Commercial Agent, Mansfield, Ohio. 

Smith, Benj. W., A. M. -Attorney-at-Law, Minn inn. 

White, [srael ('.. A. M. Prof, of Astronomy and v 

University, Morgantown, and Assistanl Ge n Pennsyl 

G logical Survey. 

W 

Babb, Chas. M., A. M.— Farmer, Greenland Gap, W. V r a. 

Border, Daniel W.. A. M.— M. D., Kearneysville, \Y. 

Boughneb, Wm. L., M. s. Attorney-at-Law, Oakland, Md. 

Brown, James F., A. M.— Attorney-at-Law, Charleston. 

Bullock, Edmund T m A. M.- Attorney-at-Law, Parkersbu 

Harris, John T., M. S. - Journalist, Peoria, 111. 

Linch, George P., M. S.- Attorney-at-Law, Wheelin 

McClure, Taylor B., M.S. Lawrence Academy, Louisa,Ky. 

Price, Thomas II.. M. S. M. I'.. Morgantown. 

Pritchard, Wm. T.. M. 8. -Fairmont, W. Va. 

Purinton, DanielB.,A. M. [nstructorin Vocal Musicand Aasistonl in 

Preparatory Department, W. Va Uni intown. 

Temple, Marcellus L, A. M. Attorney-at-Law, Osceola, h 
Waters, Jambs T., \. ML Attorney-at-Law, Ne* York City, V V. 

a ■ 



5? _ 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



1874- 

Chadwick, Richard V., A. B.— Attorney-at-Law, Morgantown. 

Dean, John S. W., A. M.— Prof. Ancient Languages, Penn. State College. 

Howell, Wm. M., A. B. -Licentiate of Union Theo. Seminary, N. Y. 

Jacobs, Thos. P., A. B. -Attorney-at-Law, New Martinsville. 

Lynch, Chas. W., A. B.— Student of Law, Clarksburg, 

Moran, Ellsworth E., A. B— Minister of the Gospel, New Egypt, X. J. 

Woods, Frank, A. M.— Attorney-at-Law, Pruntytown. 

1875. 
Adams, Samuel Shugert, A. B.— First Ass't, Children's Hospital, D. C. 
Dolliver, E. H., A. B.— Attorney-at-Law, Fort Dodge, Iowa. 
Dolliyer, J. P., A. B.— Student of Law, Fort Dodge, Iowa. 
Golden, Franklin A., B. S.— Prin. Marshall School, Xew Orleans, La. 
Martin James V., A. B.— Teacher in Indiana. 

Peterson, J. J., A. B.— Prin. Graded School, Weston, Lewis County. 
Pcrinton, A. L., A. B.— Prof. Marshall College, Huntington. 

1876. 

Anderson, John C., B. S. —Farmer, Monongalia County, 

Fsasher, Luke H., A. B. — Tippecanoe, Pa. 

Hubbard, Harry Dana, B. S.— Farmer, Connecticut. 

Ison, Willey Owens, A. B.— Teacher, Hancock, Md. 

Kemp, Howard Mason, B. 8.— Merchant, Bloomington, Md. 

Laidley, George Summers, B. S.— Principal Graded School, Charleston. 

Xash, James Henry, B. S.— Attorney-at-Law, Putnam County. 

Ramage, Thomas C, B. S.— Prin. Graded School, West Milford. 

W t etzel, Daniel Elliot, A. B. -Physician, Parkershurg, 

1877. 

Brown, William Gay, A. B.— Student of Law, Kingwood, Preston Co. 
Dille, Clarence B., A. B.— Student of Law, Morgantown. 
Hawthorn, Joseph H., A. B.— Principal Union School, Kingwood. 
Hood, Thomas M., A, B.— Physician, Fairmont. 
Rogers, Daniel R., A. B.— Student of Medicine, Morgantown, 

& - ® 



WEST VIRGINIA tJNTVKRSITY. 



Smith. Everett C, B. S.— Principal Union School, Ravenswood. 

Snivki.v, BabryJ., a. B.— Teacher, Grafton. 

Steele, John \... A. I'.. — student of Law, Morgantown. 

Stewart, .1 ikes T., B. s.- Instruct.. r in Preparatory Department W. Va, 
University, Morgantown. 



i£> 2 & 



10 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Seniors. 

Courtney, Alpheus F Sci Randall, Monongalia Co. 

Dayton, Alston Gordon Class Philippi, Barbour Co. 

Lee, James McMillen Class Holliday's Cove, Hancock Co. 

Morgan, Benjamin S Class Laurel Point, Monongalia Co. 

Marsh, Enoch Jasper. Class Morgantown. 

Rich, Daniel , ....Class Laurel Point, Monongalia Co. 

Juniors. 

Purinton, George Dana Class Morgantown. 

Wade, Spencer Sci Morgantown. 

Sophomores. 

Capehart, John Clarence 0}>t St. Albans, Kanawha Co. 

Davisson, Ithamar Opt Webster, Taylor Co. 

Grafton, Charles Edwin Sci New Cumberland, Hancock Co. 

Hardie, John Robert Opt Grafton, Taylor Co. 

Haymond, Frank Thompson. ...Opt.. Morgantown. 

Hustead, Ashbel Fairchild. ..Opt.. Morgantown. 

Keenan, B. L Sci Maidsville, Monongalia Co. 

Marsh, John Nelson Class Morgantown. 

*Pearre, Geo. A., Jr Opt Cumberland, Md. 

*Protzman, L. M Class Morgantown. 

Robinson, Claud Ernest Opt ..Patterson's Creek, Mineral Co. 

Waters, A. A Opt Laurel Point, Monongalia Co. 

* Freshmen. 

*Chancellor, E. P., Jr Class Parkersburg. 

Coleman, Theodore V Opt Morgantown. 

Class.— Classical Course. Sci.— Scientific Course. Opt.— Optional Course. Agr. Agricul- 
tural Course. -Conditioned 

& . & 



& 



VIRGINIA DNIV1 



FRESHMF 



*g 



11 



Cox. A. 1 Opt. 

FRANK Opt. 

Davisson, Floyd Opt. 

Dbmain, Edward Rjgden Opt. 



. Fairm 



Glasscock, J. 1 Class Philippi, Barbour ( 

Hall, Jesse Jasper.. Opt ' vrn. 

Henry, (' o. O'D Opt Newbui 

•Hodges, Thos. E. I 

•Hyland, Wm. M. Class Parkersburg. 

Hough, Walter Opt Morgan town. 

Lowther, Sylvesteb < >pt.. Morgantown. 

>I. Vicker, Emory L Opt.. Morgantown. 

PearrEj James Graham.. Opt Cumberland, Md 

",\, Wm. Henry:., Opt Wheeling. 

br, Howard Coopkew Class Piedmont, Mineral Co. 

Vandervort, Virgi] Opt Morgantown. 

Wiley, John Wesley Opt Wad< BtoM 

►Woodford A.lonzo Harvey. ..('lass Pleasant Creek, Barbour ( 

S. V. H.... Class Philippi, Barbou 

•Zearley, Addis (Mass Point Marion, Fayeti 



&.. 



_*s 



ST ~*8 

12 * WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Rev. J. E. THOMPSON, A. M.. 
iVesident. 

A. W. LORENTZ, A. ML, 
Principal. 

JAMES M. fflGALLS, Lieut. I t . S. A.. 
Commandant of Cadets. 

D. B. PTJKINTON, A. ML, Secretary, 
Instructor in Vocal Music and Assistant. 

JAMES S. STEWART, B. S., 
Assistant. 



3*. 



& '? 



VIRGINIA I \1\ i- :. 



^ILilSlPilliiil^ sD N Jtr JT 3 XSQilJKjtfii 1 £J * 



COH (I )'('((!'. 

Allen, George Roberta Grafton, Taylor County. 

Anderson, William Franklin Easton, Monongalia County. 

Blackiston, Thomas Copper Pied it. Minna! County. 

Brow n, Zalmon Kent. Morgantow n. 

Brown, Samuel Boardman Clinton Furnace, Monongalia Co. 

Courtney, David Had Randall, Monongalia County, 

Elliott, Adoniram Juuson Reedsville, Preston County. 

Freeman, Harry Smith Clarksburg, Harrison County. 

Haymond, George Hiram Morgantown. 

Jeffries, Eli as Dick ^.rbuckle, Mason County. 

Barton Morris. Laurel Point, Monongalia County. 

Lawhead, James Hknkv Morgantown. 

Lewellyn, Thomas Asby Easton, Monongalia County. 

Lewis, George Calvert Clarksburg, Harrison County. 

Mapel, Newton James... Rosedale, Greene County, I'a. 

ln, George Washington Laurel Point, Monongalia County 

Shafeb, William Clemens Morgantow n. 

- ele, William Alexander Morgantown. 

Tanzey, Arthur Eugene Morgantown. 

Tapp, William Whitfield Maidsville, Monongalia County. 

First Year. 

Bailey, William Hknkv Morgantown. 

Baker, i • em \\ M rgantown. 

Baker, Edward Enzeb Morgantown. 

J B\s\ett, Hillard Samubj Basnett8ville, Marion County. 

& S 



14 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



FIRST YEAR- Continued. 

Beeson, Benjamin Mead Parkersburg, Wood County. 

Boyd, Thomas McLain Clinton Furnace, Monongalia Co. 

Boyers, Luther M Randall, Monongalia County. 

Carskadon, Newton Babb Keyser, Mineral County. 

Chidester, Granville Montcalm Weston, Lewis County. 

Davis, Elza Maidsville, Monongalia County. 

Dickson, John Robert Morgantown. 

Gans, William Gordon Easton, Monongalia County. 

Gregg, Oscar Cooper ... Morgantown . 

Hall, Ira E- Laurel Point, Monongalia County. 

Hare, Alfred Jarrett.. Morgantown. 

Hawthorne, James Edmund. Randall, Monongalia County. 

Hayes, Charles A Morgantown. 

Henry, James Sycamore Dale, Harrison County. 

Hoard. Virgil Emery Stewarttown, Monongalia County. 

Hood, Frank Rivesville, Marion County. 

Hood, Smith Lowsville, Monongalia County. 

Hopkins, Charles Ellis Morgantown. 

Hussey, James Vincent Weston, Lewis County. 

Kelly, Samuel Chestnut Morgantown, 

Kelly, George Macklen Morgantown. 

Keener, Waitman Willey... Morgantown. 

Laishley, P. T. Melvin Easton, Monongalia County. 

Lazzell, Luther James Maidsville, Monongalia County. 

Lazzell, Isaac Grant Maidsville, Monongalia County. 

Lorextz, Charles Frederick Morgantown. 

Marsilliott, Leonard Ewing Pittsburgh, Pa. 

McGowan, James Ewing Independence, Preston County. 

McRa, Thomas Ison Clinton Furnace, Monongalia Co. 

Meeks, Francis Kirk Hartford City, Mason County. 

Michael, Walter Howard Briceton Mills, Preston County. 

Moeris, Henry Perry Morgantown. 

&_ £ 



ST" 

- i VIRiilMA 1M\ I 



FIRST YEAR— Continued. 

Pixter, John Milton Easton, M 

Price, Allen Reed.. CJffingl 

Price, William M n. 

Protzman, Spurgeon H.. Morgantown. 

Robison, Mklvin Emery Uffington, Monongalia County. 

rsEL, John Grove Morgantown, 

Schooley, Edward.. Bradd 

: .,:, Lorenzo Dow Stewarttowi 

. . A.LBERT... E 

Suter, Eli Painter Sutersville 

Tapp, Robert. Maidsville, M inty. 

Taylor, James Summerfield Romney, Bampshi] 

Vandervort, James Hare... Morgantown. 

Weaver, Laishley.. Easton, M 

. William HOLLAND.. [Jffington, Mono] 

Wiley, William A.nderson.. Wadestown, M 

WiLLARD, Joseph Coombs. Laurel Point, M 

Woodford, Cleophas. Pleasant < 

Yates, Edmund G. Clarks 

Zearlev. 1- ■• Point Marion, 



& 



0, 



16 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, 



Seniors G 

Juniors 2 

Sophomores 12 

Freshmen 22 

Second Preparatory Students 20 

First Preparatory Students 56 

118 



& £ 



WEST \ • 17 



mi\vlxvx\ £i acut 



REV. J. R. THOMPSON, A. M. 

JAS. M. INGALLS, Lieut. U. S. A. 
Commandant. 



STAFF. 

Cadet DANIEL RICH, First Lie: \nt. 

Cadet BENJ. S. MO I » Lieut, and Ord. Oj 



OOI^I^ISSIOn^TEID OFFICERS. 

Cadet JAS. M. LEE, Captain. 
Cadet ENOCH J. MA RSH, First Lieutenant. 
Cadet ALSTON G. DAYT< )\, Firs ant. 

Cadet DANIEL RICH, Second Liei penant. 
Cadet BEXJ. S. MO Second Likutenant. 



Cadet ALPHEUS F. COURTNEY, Color Sergeant. 



%) 3 SJ 



18 



■<a 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



mmmmm » raw 



Cadet Chan. E. Hopkins, First Sergeant. 
Cadet Bruce L. Keenan, Sergeant, 
Cadet Chas. E. Grafton, Sergeant. 

Cadet Arthur L. Cox, Corporal. 
Cadet Wm. H. Seamon, Corporal. 
Cadet Thos. E. Hodges, Corporal. 
Cadet Wm. M. Hyland, Corporal. 



No. Dist. 



II. 



III. 



IV. 



V. 



VI. 



Name. 



Remarks. 



When Enlisted 
or Discharged. 



f James M. Lee Present for duty Sept 



-J Charles E. Grafton. 

i Wm. H. Seamon.... 



Present for 
Present for 



duty, 
duty. 



f Thomas M. Hood ... Graduated.... 

i John L. Steele Graduated 

| Jos. H. Hawthorne. Graduated 

j Arthur L. Cox Present for duty. 

I H. S, Basnett Present for duty. 

I Jacob L. Glasscock. Present for duty. 



H. S. Freeman... 

James Henry 

George C. Lewis. 



( Sam'l B. Ankrom 
j Wm. M. Hyland., 

1 E. Chancellor 

I Vacancy .... 



("Harry J. Snively 

| C. E. Carr 

-J Frank K. Sleeks. 

I Vacancy 

[Vacancy....... 



Present for duty. 
Present for duty. 
Present for duty. 



Dropped from roll. 
Present for duty... 
Present for duty... 



Oct. 
March 

June 

June 

June 

Sept. 

Feb. 

!Feb. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Sept. 
Sept. 

Feb. 



Graduated 

Dropped from roll. 
Present for duty.... 



20, 1873. 

1, 1875. 

30, 1877. 

28, 1877. 
28, 1877. 
28, 1877. 

4, 1877. 
1, 1878. 
1, 1878. 

14, 1877. 

5, 1877. 
5, 1877. 

14, 1877. 
14, 1877. 
1, 1878. 



June 
Sept. 
Oct. 



28, 1877. 
14, 1877. 

5, 1877. 



fJno. C. Capeharti... Dropped from roll April 



Elias D. Jeffries Absent on leave 

Lorenzo D. Sisler.... Present for duty 
[Vacancy •••!• 



Sept. 
Oct, 



10, 1878. 

14, 1877. 

5, 1877. 



.£ 



$>' 



VIRGINIA I NIVERJ 



'7 



ROSTER OF STATE CADETS. -< 



I 












Vll. 



VIII. 



IX. 



XI. 



XII. 



A V. Courtney 

! 1. DaviasoD 

1 Bruce L. KLeenan.... 
I A. II. Wo >dford 

i Walter M.. Johnson 

0. Williard 

0. Baker 

(.. M. Chidester 



duty. 

I'lVM-nt for duty. 
A.bsent on leave. 






1 dropped from roll.. • 

r duty. Feb. I, 

ail for duty Marcl 

Present for dut 



I A. ( .. Dayton 

C. E. Hopkins.... 

: G. M. Kelley 

| Thos. E, Hodges. 



Present for duty.. 
Present for duty.. 
Present for duty. 
Present for duty. 



Sept. 11. L87 
March 

Sept 14. is: 

Sept u. is; 



f Enoeh J. Mai 

i Sam'l ('. Kelley 

I Ohas. O. Henry .... 
I David 11. Courtney 



)\ for duty, 

Present tor duty. 

Present tor duty. 

Present for duty. 



Oct 18, 

1 t. L877. 

April 13, ls77. 
3ept ! I. L877. 



I Daniel Rich Present for duty... 

T. C. Blackiston Present for duty... 

Claud E. R >binson. Resigned 

ard silver.. Dropped from roll. 

i Vacancy. 



Sept. 
Dec. 
March 



5, 1875. 
7. 1877. 



f Benj. S. Morgan Present for duty i 

I C. F. Butcher Dropped from roll Sept 1 1. L876. 

) John X. Marsh Present for duty. March 29, 1876. 

ncy. •••••! 



* Distinguished Cadets- 1876 / 



Name. 



A. G. Dayton 

Charles K. Grafton 

Joseph H. Hawthorne. 

ThomasM. Hood 

Walter M. Johnson ••■ 

M Lee 

E. J. Marsh 

Benjamin 8 Morgan... 

Daniel Rich 

Harry J. Snively 

John L. Steele 



i I \-h A! . 



I 

Classical. 
( Classical. 

i 



; 



Mil 1 1 \i:v. 



Military. 
Military. 
Military. 
Military. 
Military. 
Military. 

Military , 
Military. 
Military. 
Military. 



I,, accordance with regulations established for the government of tb 

i ;1 . distinguished in the department* opposite I jell Dama 
having attained a yearlj 100 and upwards on a scale ol • 



&. 



$ 



& 



"8 



20 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



czt 



as** 



D. B. PUEINTOJST, A. M., Instructor. 

Some years ago, the Eegents added Yocal Music to the Studies 
of tbe University. It is open, free of charge, to students of all 
departments alike. The course of Instruction embraces one 
year, as follows: 

Fall Term-— Eudi merits and Elementary Practice. 

Winter Term — Eudiments continued. Glee and Chorus 
Singing. 

Spring Term — Lectures on Harmony and Composition, Chorus 
Singing, Eeview, &c. 



Students. 



Anderson, W. F. 
♦Bailev, W. H. 
♦Blackistou, T. C. 
*Boyers, L. M. 

Courtney, A. F. 
♦Cox, Frank. 
♦Dayton, A. G-. 

Domain, E. E. 
♦Elliott, A. J. 

Freeman, H. S. 

Hoard, V. E. 

Hodges, T. E. 

Hopkins, C. E. 
♦Hough, W. 
♦Hnssey, Jas. Y. 

Jeffries, E. D. 

Jones, B. M. 

Keenan, B. L. 

Keener, W. W. 

Laishley, P. T. M. 



♦Lee, J. M. 
♦Marsh, E. J. 
♦xMarsh, J. N. 

Morgan, B. S. 

Morgan, G-. W. 
♦Pearre, G. A. 

Pixler, J. M. 
♦Price, A. E. 

Eich, D. 

Shafer, W. C. 

Silver, H. C. 

Sisler, L. D. 

Suter, E P. 

Vandervort, V. 

Waters, A. A. 

Weaver, L. 

Wiley, J. W. 
♦Wiley, Wm. A. 

Wiilard, J. C. 



& 



\For practice. 



3£ 

WEST VHvi.lMA 21 



^^It^ap^ tf\\vsj>. 



YEAR 1877-8. 



L DUNNE, B 
Hall, J. J ' ■>"■ 

HlWTEAD,A. F 

Shaker, W 

Marsilliot, L. E 

Weaver, 1 

tGAN,B.S. 

Rich, D 

Baker, G. 

Dickson, J 

Kelly, G. M... '>'• 

:nbr,W. W *'>'• 

Samsel,J.G 

Woodford, C 

• '>'• 

Freeman, H. F. ; '>'- 

Brown, Z. Telegraphy. 

Hodges, T. E !l >- 

Brown,S hy " 

Kelly, S. C ^ 

Hough, W - 

Hayes, C. A. 

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& 



22 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, 



f Uti 



The instruction thus far provided for in the University is embraced in 
six departments, viz: The Classical. Scientific, Agricultural, Engineer- 
ing, Military ; and for those desiring to qualify themselves for regular 
admission to any of these, a Preparatory Department. Xo study has 
been dropped from any of these Departments, but the method of stating 
what is required in each, has been simplified in the present Catalogue. 

Classical Department. 

The studies in this Department, required for the Degree of Bachelor 
of Arts, are as follows : 

Freshman Tear. 

FIRST TERM. 

Virgil — Bucolics and Georgics ; Prose Composition. Gildersleeve's 

Grammar and Exercise Book. 
Herodotus; Greek Prose Composition and Greek Grammar. 
Universal History — Anderson. 
University Algebra — Robinson. 
Elocution. 

SECOND TERM. 

Horace- Odes and Epodes; Latin Prose Composition (continued i. 

Homer — Iliad ; Greek Prose Composition (continued). 

English Literature— Shaw. 

Geometry (completed); Solid and Plane Trigonometry (commenced). 

Elocution. 

THIRD TERM. 

Cicero — De Senectute and De Amicitia; Exercises in Latin Prose Com- 
position . 
Homer — Odyssey; Prose Composition. 
Constitution of the United States and of West Virginia. 

® S 



WI8T VIRGINIA I M\ • ■ - 



Plane Trigonometry (completed); Sp 
etry. 

Eloeution. 

s iphomore ) 'ear. 

FIRST TERM 

_enophon— Memorabilia ; Exercises in Greek < 

Rhetoric — Haven. 

-■iration; Surveying; Navigation. 
Chemistry, Inorganic — Eliot and Storer. 
Elocution. 

SECOND TERM. 

Horace — Satires and Epistles; Exercises in Latdi 

English Philol 

Analytical Geometry — < >lney. 

Chemistry— Organic. 

Elocution. 

THIRD TERM. 

Livy— Lincoln ; Exercises in Latin Composition. 

Plato — Crito and Apology ; Exei on 

Botany — Gray. 

Differentia] Calculus— Olney. 

Elocution. 

Junior Year. 

FIRST TERM. 

Euripides' Aicestis; Or French. 

Mental Philosophy: The [ntelled -Haven, and Lecti 

Physics, General Prmriples— Solids and Fluids. 

Integral Calculus Optional). 

Physical Geography (Guyol . 

SECOND TERM 

Tacitus— Germania and A.gricola; Latin C< nch. 

Mental Philosophy : The Sensibilities and the V\ 
Physics— Pneumatic.-. Acoustics, Opl 

/, ology — Nicholson. 

THIRD TERM. 

Demosthenes en the Crown, with Written 
Physics— Heat, Correlation of 1 stricity. 

Logic -Coppee. 
Human Anatomy and Physiology— Draper. 

& 8 



® ■ t£ 

24 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Senior Year. 

FIRST TERM. 

Cicero— De Officiis; with Written Exercises on JHistorical Subjects; or 

German. 
Moral Philosophy —Way land. 
History of Civilization— Guizot. 

Geology, Lithological, Dynamical and Historical— LeConte, with Geo- 
logical Excursions. 

SECOND TERM. 

Sophocles- GEdipus Tyrannus; or German. 
Elements of Criticism -Lord Karnes. 
Astronomy, XII chapters— Loomis. 
International Law— Woolsey. 

THIRD TERM. 

Political Economy -Bowen. 
Tacitus-Annals; or German. 
Astronomy (completed). 
Christian Evidences ; Lectures by the President. 

If, in this Department, the student selects the French or German in- 
stead of the Latin or Greek, he shall be required to study them respect- 
ively, during three successive terms, and such selection must be made 
at the beginning of the Junior or Senior Year. The text books for the 
Junior Year are the same as those of the Scientific Freshmen, and for 
the Senior Year, the same as Junior Scientific. 

II. 

Scientific Department. 

The studies in this Department required for the Degree of Bachelor of 
Science are the following: 

Freshman Year. 

FIRST TERM. 

University Algebra - Eobinson. 

French— Languellier and Monsanto's French Course. 

Universal History— Anderson. 

Chemistry (Inorganic)- -Eliot and Storer. 

Elocution. 

& & 



\\ EST VIRGINIA I MY Kit- 



SECOND TERM. 

< reometry (completed), Solid and Plane Trigonometry (comment • 
French — French Course (continued); French Reader. 
English Literature— Shaw. 
Chemistry (< Organic). 
Elocution. 

THIRD TERM. 

Plane Trigonometry (completed)— Spherical Geometry and 'IV 

dry. 
French- French Course (completed); Telemaque (Surenm 
Constitution of the United States, and of Wesl Virginia. 
Botany— Gray's School and Field Book, 
^locution. 

Sophomore Year, 

FIRST TERM. 

.Mensuration. Surveying and Navigation— Robinson. 
French— Voltaire, Charles XII., French Grammar and Eiercia 
Rhetoric- Haven. 
Physics, General Principles — Solids and Fluids. 

Elocution. 

SECOND TERM 

Analytical < reometry — < Mney. 

French, Classic Plays— Joynes ; Grammar and Exert 

Chemical Analysis. 

Physics- Undulations, Acoustics, Optics, Problems. 

Elocution' 

THIRD TERM. 

Meteorology — Loomis. 

Differentia] Calculus— ( >lney. 

French (Optional)— Pylodet'a Classic Literature. 

Physics- 1 1 eat : Magnetic, Statical and Dynamical Electricity. 

Chemical Analysis. 

Elocution. 

Junior )'c((i'. 

FIRST TERM 

Integral ( lalculus — Olney. 

German Woodbury's Complete Course. 

Mental Philosophy, The Intellect Haven, and Lectures. 

l'h\ sical ( teographj < 1 uyot 

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£? 6 "® 

^O WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



SECOND TERM. 

Analytical Mechanics -Peck. 

German— Grammar (continued) ; German Reader. 
Zoologj'— Nicholson. 

Mental Philosophy— The Sensibilities and the Will— Haven, and Lec- 
tures. 

THIRD TERM. 

Analytical Mechanics (completed). 

German— Grammar and Free Exercises; Schiller's Jungfrau or Maria 

Stuart. 
Logic — Coppee. 
Human Anatomy and Physiology — Draper. 

Senior Year- 

FIRST TERM. 

Moral Philosophy — Wayland. 

German— Goethe's Iphigenia in Tauris, orEgmont; Grammar and Ex- 
ercises. 

History of Civilization— Guizot. 

Geology— Lithologicnl, Dynamical and Historical— LeConte, with Geolo- 
gical Excursions. 

SECOND TERM. 

International Law — Woolsey. 

3erman Fouque's Undine ; Grammar and Exercises. 

Elements of Criticism— Lord Karnes. 

Astronomy Descriptive and Physical. 

THIRD TERM. 

Evidences of Christianity— Lectures by the President. 

Political Economy — Bo wen. 

German (Optional)— Evans' German Literature; Grammar and Exer- 
cises. 

Practical Astronomy— Calculation and Construction of Eclipses, verified 
by the Nantical Almanac. 

Agricultural. 



» . 8 



\\fc>T VIRGINIA IM\ I - 



III 

Pepartment of Engineering. 

The studies in this Department for the first, second and thii 
are the same as in the Scientific Course. Foi ti 

as follows : 

FIRST TEEM. 

Civil Engineering— Mahan. 
Moral Philosophy— AV ay land. 
Physical Geography (Gu> 

Geology— Lithological, Historical and Dynamical— LeConte, with G 
logical Excnrsions. 

SECOND TERM 

Military Engineering — Mahan. 
Astronomy— Descriptive and Physical. 
International Law — Woolsey. 
Elements of Criticism— Karnes. 

THIRD TERM. 

Gillespie on the Location, Construction and Improvement of Roads and 

Railroi 
Astronomy Practical. 
Evidences of Christianity; Lectures by the President 

The studies of the Modern Languages are the same as in the Scientific 
Com- 

In addition to the textbooks prescribed to the stndentsof Modern 
Languages, they are required to read a prescribed course of Literature 
and write exercises, both by dictation and translation, in French and 
< rerman. 

IV. 

Military Department. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term— Infantry Tactics : School of the Soldier. 

m. Term- -Infantry Tactics: School of the Company. 
Third Term— Infantry Tactics: Bayonel I 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term— Infantry Tacti< >1 of the Battalion. 



%> ~® 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Second Term— Cavalry Tactics: Sabre Drill. 

Third Term — Target Practice : Artillery and Small Arms. 

THIftD YEAR. 

First Term— Infantry Tactics and Practice. 

Second Term— Artillery Tactics : Field Fortifications. 

Third Term— Target Practice : Heavy and Field Artillery. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term— Infantry Tactics : School of the Brigade. 

Second Term— Ordnance and Gunnery. 

Third Term— Advance Guard and Outpost Duty. 

Dress Parades, Reviews, Inspections and Guard Mountings are held 
as often as is deemed expedient throughout the entire course. 

The other studies in this Department are those of the Classical or the 
Scientific Department, respectively. 



Agricultural Department. 

The studies of this Department are, at present, embraced in a two 
years' course. Students having creditably completed this course, will 
be entitled to receive a certificate to that effect. 

First Year. 

FIRST TERM. 

Inorganic Chemistry. 
Physics — Solids and Fluids. 
General History. 
French or German (Optional). 

SECOND TERM. 

Organic Chemistry ; Zoology. 

English Literature. 

French or German (Optional). 

THIRD TERM. 

Botany and Vegetable Physiology. 

Heat, Magnetism and Electricity. 

Plane Trigonometry. 

Constitution of the United States, and of West Virginia. 

'&_ 8 



WEST VIRGINIA I M\ ERS] I ^ . 



ond Year. 

FIRST TERM. 

Analytical Chemistry, Geology, Meteor • 
Chain and Compass Surveying. 



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SECOND TUB 

Analysis of Soils: Entomology, 

Astronomy. 

French <>r German i< Optional). 

THIRD TBBM. 
Allen's Farm Book. 
Gillespie, od Roads and Road Making. 
Political Economy. 
Evidences of Christianity; Lectures by the President. 

The Subjects for Lectures during the Course, are I 

First Year. 

FIRST TERM. 

The Chemistry, Structure and Physiology of Plants. 

On the Water, Atmosphere an<l Soil, as Related to Vegetables. 

On Tillage, Draining and Manuring. 

SECOND TERM. 

On Domestic Animals and their Digestion, Respiration, Assimilation 
and Excretion. 

On the Composition, Preparation and Valueof Different KindsofF I. 

On Milk, Butter, Cheese, Flesh and W< jricultural Products. 

THIRD TERM. 

On Horticultural and Kitchen Gardening. 

On the Propagation, Training and Culture of Fruil Trees, the Vine, 
Small Fruits and Vegetables. 

Second Yea 

FIRST TERM. 

on the Staple Grain, Forage, Root, and Fibre Cropsof this and 
States, and their Varieties, and the Best Soils Adapted for Th< 

On the Preparation of Soil, Seeding, Cultivating, Harvesting and Pr< 
paring for Market. 

on the Origin and Natural History of Domestic Anii 

On Entomology, and the insects Useful and Hurtful to Vegetation. 

£> 



5$ ^ 

30 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, 



SECOND TERM. 

On the Kaising, Care, Characteristics and Adaption of Different Breeds 

of Domestic Animals. 
On Cattle for Beef or Draft, and Sheep for Wool or Mutton. 
On Horses, Swine and Poultry. 
On Pasturing, Soiling and Stall Feeding. 
On Tobacco. Hops and Forestry. 

THIRD TERM. 

On Rural Economy. 

On the History of Agriculture, with sketches of the same in ancient 
and modern times ; and in foreign lands. 

On the Adaptation of Farming to Soil, Climate, Market and Other Nat- 
ural and Economical Conditions. 

On the Different Systems of Husbandry, such as Stock, Sheep, Grain 
and Mixed Farming. 



& £ 



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WEST VIRGINIA UNIV] 



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32 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Preparatory Department. 
First Year. 

FIRST TEEM. 

Geography — Guyot's Common School; Map Drawing. 
Arithmetic Stoddard's Complete. 
English Grammar— Etymology. 
Latin (commenced). 

SECOND TEEM. 

Geography— Guy ot (continued); Map Drawing. 
Arithmetic (continued). 
English Grammar— Syntax. 

Latin— Grammar and Reader. 

THIRD TERM. 

Arithmetic (completed). 

English Grammar — Analysis of Sentences, 

Latin — Grammar and Readers. 

Greek— Bullion's First Lessons. 

Second Tear. 

FIRST TERM. 

Algebra— Eobinson's Elementary, to Involution. 

Book-keeping. 

Caesar (two books) — Latin Grammar. 

Greek— Grammar and Reader. 

SECOND TERM. 

Algebra— Robinson's Elementary (completed). 

History of the United States— Anderson's. 

Cicero's Orations (three orations) Bull ion's Latin Grammar. 
Greek — Grammar and Reader. 

THIRD TERM. 

Geometry- Robinson (first four books). 
History of the United States (completed). 
Virgil — Three Books of iEneid ; Latin Grammar. 
Xenophon's Anabasis (two books) ; Greek Grammar. 

Regular lessons in Writing, Spelling, Elocution and English Composi 
tion from beginning. 

& £ 



8 

WEST VIRGINIA [JNIVER8ITY. 



The course preparatory to the Scientific, the i 
Military Department is the same as the above with t!i 
Citizens' Manual. Physiology, Natural Philosophy ai I B 
Arithmetic, each one term, respectively, for the studies 

The studies preparatory t<» the Agricultural Departm< 
follows : 

Pibst Tkbm — Algebra ; Arithmetic ; Gram 

ind Teem —Algebra: Arithmetic; Grammar; 11 st irj CJ. S 

Thied Teem — < reometry ; Arithmetic ; < J-ramm 



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34 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



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VIRGIN] \ UNIVERSITY. 



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FOUNDATION OF THE UNIVERSITY. 

The Wesi Virginia University owes its existence to the combined 
bounty of the United States Government, the Legislature of West Vir- 
ginia, and the citizens of Morgantown. On the 2d of July, L862, the 
United States ( longress passed an act granting public hinds to the seve- 
ral States and Territories which should provide Schools for the promo- 
tion of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts. Under this act, thirty 
thousand acres Eoreach of its Senators and Representatives in Cong 
were appropriated to this State. The proceeds of the sale of tfc 
3sional lands amounted to $90,000. 

The Constitution of West Virginia makes it the duty of the 1 • 
ture to "foster and encourage .Moral. Intellectual. Scientific and I 
cultural improvement; and to make provision for the < >n of 

such institutions of Learning as the best inter, teraJ education 

may demand." The National gifl was. therefore, accepted by the I 
lature, and a Board appointed to organize the Institution, with instruc- 
tions to "establish Departments of Education in Literature, Science. 
Art. Agriculture and Military Tactics— including a Preparatory Depart- 
ment" 

The Legislature, realizing the value of such an Institution, its priceless 
worth to the state and Nation, its indispensable qi I i the new 

mountain Commonwealth, and in pursuant ■ constitutional duty, 

has increased the endowment to about $110,000, with annual appropria- 
tions for current and contingenl expenses. A.s no pari of th< 
sional grant can be applied to the erection of buildings (one-tenth only 
being allowed for the purchase of an experimental Earn 
ture has also made provision for the supply and keeping in orderof such 
buildings as the growth of the Institution may, from time to time, de- 
mand. Every interest of V\ Lnia requires that >he furnish her 
sons the best possible educational ad-, within her own boi 
For the development of Wesi Virginia resources, il is 
West Virginia brain should be educated on Weal Virginia 



36 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



The citizens of Morgantown, noted for their generosity and keen ap- 
preciation of educational advantages, contributed in grounds, buildings 
and money, about $50,000. 

The University stands, therefore, in important relations to the Nation 
and State, and is bound to the sacred performance of all duties growing 
out of these relations. 

NAME AMD GOVERNMENT. 

At the beginning, in common with some other National Colleges, it 
was simply called the "Agricultural College." Having been, however, 
fully adopted by the State, and the means originally supplied to aid in 
its establishment being further supplemented by the Legislature, an act 
was passed, pursuant to the recommendation of the Governor, ordering 
that it should thereafter be known by the style and designation of 
"West Virginia University." It is under the immediate oversight of 
a Board of twelve Regents, one from each Senatorial district, appointed 
by the Governor, and required to report biennially, through the Gov- 
ernor to the Legislature. The bitterness of partisan and sectarian dis- 
putes is excluded from its Halls, and every effort made to secure to each 
student the full advantage of a broad and manly culture. 

SCOPE. 

This is entirely in accord with the original design of the institution, 
as seen in the first paragraph of these " General Remarks." The act of 
Congress contemplated the founding of institutions that would furnish 
not only "practical" but also "liberal education"— education "in the 
several purswts," and just as certainly " in the several profemom" of life. 
It forbids the exclusion of ''classical studies," and requires attention to 
Agricultural and Mechanical Education, Military Tactics, etc. The act 
of the Legislature contemplated a school of general instruction, and 
directed the Board to organize several distinct departments, as above 
enumerated, in the interest of the people of the State and of the Nation. 

We trust that in the extent and in the quality of its work, and the 
thoroughness of its discipline and culture, as well as adaptation to the 
demands of the age, the University will prove itself deserving of no 
second rate position among the institutions of our land. It designs, by 
its instruction in Literature and Art; in Language, ancient and modern; 
in Mathematics, pure and applied ; in the Sciences, agricultural, physi- 
cal, mental, moral and social ; by its recitations, lectures, examinations 
and elevating influences, to educate, inform and discipline the student's 
mind ; to strengthen his moral principles, and supply such general and 
generous, as well as special, culture as wall best prepare him for success 
and usefulness in any pursuit or profession in life. 

OPPORTUNITIES AFFORDED. 

The work which the University is accomplishing can be readily un- 

&__ £ 



WEST VIRGINIA i M\ i bfi 



derstood from the Courses of Study prescribed in each oi the Dep 
ments as already Bet forth. 

We call special attention, however, to some feature 
Departments, viz: 

THE AGRICULTURAL. 

Young men who desire to study only such bran 
Farmer to pursue his calling with intelligence and profit will berefind, 
at small expense of time or means, all they Deed in the wi 
practical education. They are cot required to Btudy an\ but 

their own, aor go in mathematics farther than land butv( 
deficient in elementary studies must Bpend at leae 
paratory studies before entering this Department. 

THE MILITARY. 

The law provides that three Cadets may be appointed for each 8 
District in the state. These are educated free of cosl for tuition, b 

stationery, &c. For such as desire a military and engineering education; 
this department is provided. Cadets, however, are not limited to 1 
but may pursue their studies in any department of the University, sub" 
ject to the genera] regulations laid down in the Code for the I 
Other students are permitted to drill, on condition that they provide 
themselves witji the neat and becoming uniform of the Corps. Dril 
cupies one hour on each of four days in the week. The United St 
Government liberally furnishes the special supplies required for this 
partment. These are of the Latest and most improved construction. 

Applicants for admission to the ( lorps should address the Regenl of the 
Senatorial District in which they reside, stating age, attainment 
reference as to character, etc-. Applicants must be between sixteen and 
twenty-one years of age. The members of the Cadet ( 
rally esteemed among the best scholars in the University. 

THE PREPARATORY. 

But comparatively few of our young men in West Virginia have home 
advantages for properly and fully preparing themselves to enter upon 

ilar College studies. This Department has proi 
of supply for the higher classes, and also the means of maintain,, 
elevated grade of preliminary scholarship for admission to them 
the Bigh Schools, Academies and Graded Schools i 
in number and effi q the same proportion will the ne 

this Department diminish. Meanwhile, and until the 
fuller development, it cannot he dispensed with without lowerii, 
standard of Collegiate Study proper, or shutting OUl from the advant 
of the Institution man . » >t and most promising youii 

the State. Nowtie an young men be better prepared I 

vanced studies, or, if this is not contemplated, accomplish more thor- 
oughly and advantageously such studies as are here provided. 

& : & 



38 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Those who do not contemplate a full course, can also here be furnished 
with instruction in such preparatory studies as they may desire to pur- 



sue. 



An Optional Course is allowed those students whose special tastes or 
necessities prevent them from graduating in any of the regular Depart- 
ments. Parents and guardians of students who expect to attend the 
University are, however, earnestly advised to direct their studies with a 
view to entering one of the regular Departments. The attention of those 
who teach in our intermediate schools is also respectfully invited to this 
suggestion. 

During the Spring Term of each year (beginning on the last Wednes 
day of March), unusual facilities are provided for all who may desire 
either to take a short- and limited course, or to fit themselves for the 
higher grades of teaching, clerking, or other specialties. All needed as- 
sistance in this work being rendered by the several Professors of the 
University, superior advantages are thus afforded to all coiners. 

NORMAL INSTRUCTION. 
When desired, classes are formed in the Theorv and Practice of Teach- 
ing, under the charge of an able and experienced instructor Lecture 
are from time to time delivered before the class by the several members 
of the Faculty. The daily contact of the .students in the class-room 
with their teachers, observing their methods and studying their plans 
affords line opportunities in this department of instruction. Nowhere 
in the State are afforded better facilities for practical Normal drill \ 
reference to the present occupations of our Alumni, in the former part 
of this Catalogue, will show the positions, as teachers, our graduates are 
enabled immediately to secure and retain. 

REQUISITES FOR ADMISSION. 

I. All candidates for admission to any Department of the University 
must present satisfactory evidence of good moral character 

II. Students coming from other Colleges must produce certificates of 
honorable dismission from the same. No person shall be admitted into 
the Senior class after the beginning of the University year 

III. Those entering as Students for a Degree in any Department of 
he University, must sustain an examination in the various studies of 

the Preparatory School of the University, or their equivalent 

IV. Candidates for advanced standing must sustain an examination in 
the previous studies of the Department which they desire to enter 

V. The regular examination for admission of candidates, who have 
not pursued the preliminary studies in the Preparatory School of the 
University will take place on Friday, succeeding Commencement, and 
on the first day of the First Term. 

VI. Candidates should procure a copy of the printed laws of the Uni- 
versity also the Treasurer's receipt for tuition, before presenting them- 
selves for enrollment. 

» . & 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



VUL Applicants for admission to the Preparatory Department d 
stand an approved examination on spelling, reading, writing, mod< 
geography, elements ol English grammar, and arithmetic thron 

mon fraction-. 

VIII. Students are required t<> pronounce Greek and Latin according 
to the so-called Continental method. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

I. Each student, at the close of the Term, shall stand a public writ! 
examination upon all the studies which he has pursued during thai 
Term. No student shall be excused for non-attendance od such exami- 
nations, except upon presentation or a reason which may be considi 
valid by the Faculty. No student who may be absent, and not thufl 
cused, shall be allowed to continue in connection with the University. 
If at the close of any Term a student shall have failed to attain a stand- 
ing of 6, on a scale of 10, owing to a failure in examination, he shall be 
informed of the tact, and he may he allowed to stand a special exami- 
nation tinder the same Committee at anytime before the beginnm 
the next College year. 

II. The examination of each class shall he conducted by a COmmJ 
composed of three members of the Faculty, who shall, within three day- 
next preceding the examination, select a series ol questions, not 
than nine nor more than fifteen in number, and submit the same in 
writing to the class at the time of examination. 

III. After examination the committee shall examine the pap 
determine the standing made by each student In examination, which 
shall be considered the equivalentof one month's standing in recitation. 

IV. Before a student shall be entitled to enter a higher class he shall, 
on ascaleof 10, have attained a minimum standing of 6 in each study 
belonging to his class, which shall be determined by the average o! his 
recitations and examinations. 

v. students who have not before been at the University should, on 
theirarrival. report themselves to the President, and by him be assigned 
to such department and studies as they may desire and be prepan 
enter. When & regular course of study is once adopted, the student is 
not allowed to vary from it, OT change to another, without permission. 

TUITION. 

Tuition in the Preparatory Department 15 00 per term. 

in other departments - - - - 
Contingent Fee in Preparatory Dep'1 - 2 00 
" in other departments - 2 00 

BOARDING AND EXPENSES. 

The untvbbsitv has no DoBMrroBixs. This is a matter both of neces- 
sity and policy; of necessity, because theState has nol been able to 
tarnish money to build dormitories; of policy, because it is thought 

& ^ ® 



s> —~ — ?& 

40 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



better for the students to be distributed among the people of the Uni- 
versity town, amenable to the common laws and sentiments of society 
The public bounty stops at furnishing free instruction, leaving to private 
hands the providing of maintenance. 

Three methods of boarding are practiced: (1) Self boarding, bv in- 
dividuals, or, more commonly, by small groups or colonies composed of 
members of the same family, or of neighboring families. Rooms are 
hired, and furniture, provision and fuel brought from home. When 
well managed, this is an excellent and very economical mode of living. 
From $1.00 to $1.50 a week per pupil may be set down as the cost. (2) 
Club boarding. This has been practiced for some time and is an excel- 
lent system. A company of young men rent a number of rooms or an 
entire house and then organize and operate a boarding club. The 
price of boarding in clubs varies from $1.50 to $2.50 per week, includ- 
ing rent of room. (3) Boarding in families. The difficulties formerly 
encountered in procuring suitable places for students desiring to board 
in families, have disappeared. Good boarding can be found at reason- 
able prices ranging from $3.00 to $4.00. 

Incidental expenses depend on the habits of the student. The law 
prohibits students incurring debts at stores, groceries, &c., except on 
written order of parents, guardian or teacher. Unnecessary and lavish 
expenditures induce not only waste of time and means, but neglect of 
study and formation of bad habits. 

The necessary expenses for the college year of forty-one weeks are less 
here than in any other place know to us, where the same quality of 
instructions and other equal advantage are furnished. A young man of 
moderately economical habits need not spend more than $175.00 per year 
including board, room-rent, tuition, etc., and have every advantage afforded 
by the University. 

PRIZES. 

The Regent's Prize.— To the student who shall write the best essay 
upon a given subject, $25. To the student who shall be adjudged the 
best declaimer, $15. These prizes to be awarded after public competition, 
by a committee of citizens appointed by the Faculty. 

These were awarded at the last contest as follows, viz : 
Essay— E. J. Marsh ...$25 00 

The prize for Declamation $15.00, was divided, two-thirds being given 
to C. T. Butcher and one-third to A. H. Woodford. 

DICIPLINE. 

The rules of the University require that every student shall be in his 
place at all stated exercises from the opening to the close of his connec- 
tion with the University. A record is kept in which are entered the 
grade of Scholarship of each student, his absence from the exercises 
of the institution, his tardiness, or failure in recitation, unless satisfac- 
torily accounted for. An abstract of this record, is sent at the close of 

&- - & 



W1OT viu.il ma inivkkmi v . 11 



each term, to parents or guardians, so that they may see what and bo* 
their sons and wards are studying, and howthej stand in scfa 
and deportment In case of negligence, irregularity, orothei 
duct, the student will be privately admonished and the p 
dian will be informed of the fact Mere inattention to study will U 
persisted in, insure d i s m issal from the University, Nostudent is allowed 
to leave the precints of the [Jniversity during term timewitho 
permission. 

The attention of parents and guardians is especially called to th< 
that all exercisea begin promptly on the day stated in the calendar, and 
that it is essential to the beet interest of thestudenl and of bis i 
mates thai he be punctual in his place from the first day of the term till 
the last. No excuse will be accepted for absence unless Buch absent 
unavoidable. It must be distinctly understood that student- are allowed 
to enter only on condition that they comply with the rule- of the Uni- 
versity, and apply themselves punctually and without interruption to 

their prescribed studies. College duties once assumed require ■ stu- 
dent's tull time, and no extra work taken up by himself or imposed b] 
others, and no absence for the mere pleasure of the student 01 
friends can be allowed to interfere with those duties. 

The government of the students proceeds upon an entirely Christian 
basis. Kindness, gentleness and trustfulness are relied upon, rather 
than sternness, impatience and suspicion. In such an atmosphere, all 
noble and manly qualities ripen, and students learn to demean them- 
selves as Christian gentlemen, students are encouraged and incited t.. 
form habits of economy, industry, self-reliance, truthfulness and purity 
and thus to become a law unto themselves. 

RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTIONS AND WORSHIP 

The exercises of each day are opened with reading the Scriptures, 
singing and prayer, at which all the students are required to be 
They are also required, unless for sufficient reason excused, t<> attend 

regularlv some place of religious worship on the Sabbath, and on all <-c- 
casions to treat the institutions of religion with respect The institution 
is entirely free from sectarian control or domination, 

In the internal management ami practical working of the institution, 

there is not now, and never has been, the slightest denominational frii 
tion. 

LIBRARY. 

A respectable beginning towards a [Jniversity Library has been made. 
About live thousand volumes have been carefully select* d an. I placed on 
its shelves, including, not only many choice and valuable books of ret 
erence, but also standard works in the various departments of History, 
Biography, Theology, Agriculture, An>. Science and General Literature. 
During the past year, about one hundred and tiit\ volumes hi 

a> 6 . 8 



42 



^ 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



added by purchase to the Library, including a number of very valuable 
works on Literature and Science. 

We respectfully request the friends of Education to make contribu- 
tions to its shelves. In addition to those hitherto granted, the follow- 
ing donations have been received during the year : 



Vols. 



Title. 



l'Friendsin 17th Century 

4iReportof U. S. Commissioners at Vienna. 



Geological Survey of Colorado 

Transportation Routes to the Seaboard 

Mineral Resources West of the Rocky Moun- 
tains 

Messages and Documents 

War Department, part 1, 2, 3, of 1874-5 .... 
" " 1875-6 :.: ! 

Department of Agriculture of 1875 

Congressional Record, Vol. V.... , 

West Virginia Reports , 

Senate and House Documents 

Proceedings of American Philosophical So- 
ciety , 

Catalogue of Mt. St. Mary's Library , 

Statutes of U. S 

Finance Report 

Trial of W. W. Belknap 

Annual Reports of Bureau of Statistics.... 

Department of Agriculture 

Report of Silver Commissiou 

Public Libraries 

Congressional Record 

History of Kanawha 

Report of Commissioner on Patents 

Chinese Emigration 

Report of Silver Commission, 

Messages and Document War Department 
Vol 4, 1876-7 

Geographical Survey Vol. 4, Paleontology. 

The Sons of Godwin 

ljThe Court of King Edwin 



Donor. 



Senator Hereford. 



Hon. C. J. Faulkner. 

Secretary of State of West Virgin i 

Hon. H. G, Davis. 



The Author. 
Hon. H. G. Davis. 



Hon. F. Hereford. 
Hon. H. G. Davis. 
G. W. Atkinson, author 



Hon. B. F. Martin. 



Wm. Leighton, the author. 



Total 90 1 



Nearly all the Weekly journals of the State, the Tri-weekly Wheeling 
Register, the Daily Wheeling Evening Standard, the Wheeling Intelligencer, 
and valuable religious papers of all the leading religious denominations, 
are gratuitously sent to the reading room of the University. 

MUSEUM, APPARATUS, &c 

The University is in possession of apparatus requisite for thorough 
illustration of Chemistry and Physics. 

Several valuable articles of apparatus have been obtained for the 
department of Astronomy and Physics, including a Smithsonian Baro- 
meter, by Greene, of New York; a Sextant, by Crichton, of London; 
and a Clock with Zinc Compensation, by E. Howard & Co., of Boston. 
A seven-foot Telescope has been constructed by John Byrne, of New 
York. It is equatorially mounted with right ascension and declination 
Gircles and is a first-class instrument in every respect. 

The department of Historv has been furnished with a large map of 

3* . £ 



5* ig 

Wi;>T VIRGINIA i m\ BBS] 



tlie United States, and a foe Bel oi Bretschneider and Bpni 
rical Wall Maps, ten in number, from the German publishis 
Justus Perthes, oi Gotha. Three oi White's m ■« M*pe o 
ginia, have also been provided for use in different departn 
University. 

TheMnsenm contains extensive Mineralogical i Oon- 

chologica] cabinets, together with many specimens in othej 
of Natural History. We request all who are interested in such matt 
to send suitable specimens for the museui ily Indian 

shells, minerals, fossils and alcoholic 9] • oi animals, Such 

nations will be acknowledged and carefully Labeled with thenami 
the donor. There arc already over 2,000 specimens of mini 
fossils, and more than 2,300 of recent shells. 

The vicinity of the University oners unrivalled advanl 
study of practical Geology. Especial attention will be paid to this 
branch. 

The labratory of Practical Chemistry is in operation. The instruction 
for the present is devoted chiefly to analysis, with its application to 
agriculture. 

The following donations have been made to the Musuem during the 
present scholastic year: 

1. A large collection oi fossil plants, collected from the rjpper C 
Formation of West Virginia. Presented by Profs. White and Fontaine. 

2. A specimen of Indian Rice, from Michigan. 

3. A model in Coguina stone oi the Old Gateway, at 8t Augustine, 
Florida. Presented by Jacob Hornbro heeling. 

4. Maple Sugar, put up in a brich hark basket by the Lndianf 
Michigan. Presented by Mrs. Jacob Qornbrook. 

5. Specimens of fossil plants. Presented by A. 1. Kinkaid, of White 
Day, Monongalia county, W. Va. 

6. Fox Squirrel, by Hon. P. P. Berkshire. 

7. EggCaseof Mollusk, by Mr. .1. M. Lee, oi the Senior* 
x . Lophophyllum, by Mr. G. P. Purinton, oi the Junior < 

'.'. Indian Quoit, by Mr. Amos Halyard, Preston county, W. \'a. 
10. A copy of the New Testament in Chinese, by Via Pn 
Pyon. 

UNITED STATES SIGNAL STATION. 

By direction oi General Myer. Chief Signal Officer oi the Ann; 
nal station has been established at the Dniversity for the I 
merce, Agriculture and Science. It tit, in chat geant 

P. Dunne, S. 8., 0". S. Army. Students are by this means furnished with 
special advantages for the study oi Meteorology and related sub 
The frequent and carefully record* <i ob» rvatione taken by means of the 
most improved instruments will furnish accurate and reliable dat 
hereafter estimating climatic changes in w 
also, the newspapers, boards of trade, and river men generally, at I' 

$ 8 



44 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



burgh, Wheeling and Cincinnati, if they so desire, can be reliably ad- 
vised of special movements in the river at the head of navigation. An 
abstract of the observations at this station for the year 1877, is printed 
at the end of the Catalogue. Sergeant Dunne also teaches Telegraphy 
and Signaling, gratuitously. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are two of these in connection with the University, supplied 
with suitable halls, tastefully furnished, whose exercises in Composition, 
Reading, Orations, Debate and Criticism are, in many respects, of great* 
advantage to the student. They also afford facilities for the study of, and 
acquaintance with, Parliamentary forms, and the acquisition of business 
habits. The authorities of the University will afford every facility for 
increasing the accommodation and usefulness of these valuable aux- 
iliaries. 

LOCATION. 

Morgan town, the seat of the University, is beautifully located on the 
right bank of the Monongahela river, Monongalia county, AVest Virginia. 
The scenery around is exceedingly attractive and picturesque. The 
place has long been famous for its social, intellectual and moral culture, 
and general healthfulness. Coaches leave every morning to and from 
Fairmont, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. There is also a daily 
conveyance between Morgantown and Uniontown, Pa. Steamboats 
from Pittsburgh arrive every day at Geneva", twelve miles below Morgan- 
town, and Congress has made liberal appropriations for the continuance 
of slack water navigation in the Monongahela as far as Morgantown. A 
place more eligible for the quiet and successful pursuit of Science and 
Literature is nowhere to be found. 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS. 

The buildings are eligibly situated, and are admirably adapted to the 
purposes of the University. They are immediately outside, and within 
a few minutes' walk of Morgantown. The campus is ample, and is a 
fine natural park. The grounds command a wide and noble prospect ; 
the town, the river, the bridge, the mountains, all feast the eye and soul. 
The buildings are models of architectural beauty and convenience, and 
are healthfully constructed. In addition to Preparatory Hall, the Armory 
has been furnished, and is now occupied. The splendid University 
Building has also been finished and partly furnitured. The Commence- 
ment exercises of 1877 were held in its spacious and elegant Hall. Year 
by year, all the appointments of the University grow more desirable 
and attractive. It is surely winning its way to the lasting affection and 
deserved support of the people of West Virginia. 



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Bjesl Virginia ^niversitji, 



MORGANTOWN. 



— S~ -4 /-» — >-* 

-— -~ — -- — I >• — >.-• 







WHEELING: 
\\\ .]. Johnston, Pi bi u 



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According to an order of the Regents, J 
University year includes forty-one we< 
fore, into three terms. 

The First Term begins on the firsi Wednesday of Septoml 
and continues thirteen weeks. 

The Second Term begins on the fourth We< 
vember, and the Third, on the second Wednesday oi Ma 

The Annual Commencement is on ol 

June. 

Prompt attendance at the beginning oi each term is very im- 
portant i" the student. 

L879. 
.June 5th.— Thursday, 9 a. m.— Annual Examination 

8th.— Sunday, 3 p. m.— Baccalaureate Sermon, by tl 
9th.— Monday, 7:30 p. m.— ] 
10th.— Tuesday, 7:30 p. h.— Annual - 

Historical Society. 
Uth.— Wednesday, 7:30p. M.-Addn 
L2th.— Thursday, 9 \ w.— < 
lie I 
September 3d. -Wednesday, 9 \. «. Examination of I 
admission. 
Ith.— Thursday, 9 l i. !:• 
November 25th.— Tuesday.— First Term < • 
November 26th.— Wednesday, 9 \. m. -><•« I Teru 

.March 9th. - Tuesday Second Term ends. 
March LOth.— Wednesday— Third Ten 
April 23d.— Friday— Junior Exhibition. 
June LOth.— Thursday— Third Term ends. 



£> 



-± WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



-it 



mvtl of %t%tu 



No. of Dist. Name of Regent. P. 0. Address. 

1 B. W. Allen, ..Wheeling. 

2 James Morrow, Jr., Fairmont. 

3 ....M. S. Hall, Harrisville. 

4 D. D. Johnson, ...Long Reach. 

5 .James Stewart, Raymond City. 

6 H. S. Walker, Charleston. 

7 H. C. Simms, Huntington. 

8 A. F. Mathews Lewisburg. 

9 T. J. Farnsworth, Buckhannon. 

10 H. W. Reock, Morgantown. 

11 John A. Robinson,- Patterson's Creek 

12 ....D. B. Lucas, Charlestown. 



Officers of the Board. 

D. D. JOHNSON. President. 

A. W. LORENTZ, Treasurer. 
JOS. MOREL AND, Secretary. 

Executive Committee. 

HUGH W. BROCK, Chairman. 
JOHN J. BROWN. 
MARSHALL M. DENT. 
DAVID H. CHADWICK. 
ASHBEL FAIRCHILD. 
JOS. A. McLANE. 
GEORGE C. STURGISS. 
JAS. C. WALLACE. 

Secretary. 
GEORGE C. STURGISS. 

Superintendent of Grounds and Buildings. 
E. SHISLER. 



3T $ 



WEST VIKHIMA I'M VI 



xnVh) ;nul U l c\uhers* 



REV. J. R. THOMPSON, \. M.. Pbisidi 

P , 1/, /»/'// and Mart s 

P. s. LYON, A. M.. Vice Presidi 

/'/"/'. of History, Political !'■ 

WM. M. FONTAINE, M. A 
Prof, of Agriculture, Chemistry, ami /'/. 

ROBT. C. BERKELEY, M. A . 
Prof, of Ancient Languages and Literature, a 

JOHN I. ttARVEY, A .M.. 
iVo/. 0/ Modern Languages and I. 

I. C. WHITE, A. M.. 
/',<</'. oj [strunumy and Natural 11 

A. W. LORENTZ, A. M.. 
Principal of tin /' 

D. B. PUR1NTON, A M.. 
Prof, of I 

II. W. BROCK, M. 1'.. 
Prof, of Anatomy, I 

'& ■ 



5?" 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



>£ 



^*ACWX«1?Y— Continued. 

MA J. THOS. F. SNYDER, 
Prof, of Military Science and MatJiematics. 

ST. GEORGE T. BROOKE, 

Prof, of Law and Equity. 

JAMES S. STEWART, B. S., 
Assistant in Preparatory Department. 

JOHN J. McLEAN, S. C. U. S. A.. 
Meteorological Observer and Instructor in Signaling dud Telegraphy. 




3£ '1 

WEST VIRGINIA UNH 7 



«L-LX;iL' s I/lLilEiiS/ 



CHAS. DA VII- I 

Richard Brinsley Sheridan -The Wit, the Oi 
and the Dramatist." 

Hon. FRANK EEREFORD, 
! The American Farmer— The Hope oi the Country." 

Rt. Rev. GEO. W. PETERKIN, h. D., 
•• What ( lonstitutes Manliness." 

Rev. .1. W. CARTER, 
•' Darwinism." 

Rev. W. B. WATKINS, D. D., 
•• The Qse, Abuse and Beauty oi English Words." 
••A Glance at English Literature." 



£> 



W.M. DANCER, Janitor, 



ft 



& 



"^ 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



1870. 

Dext, Marmaduke H., A. M. 



Dille, Oliver H., M. S. 



Drabell, John H., A. M. 
McLaxe, Allex E., A. M. 



Babb, Chas. M., A. M. 
Border, Daniel W., A. M. 
Boughxer, Wm. L., M. S. 
Brown, James F., A. M. 
Bullock, Edmund T., A. M. 
Harris, Jonx T., M. S. 
Linch, George P., M. S. 

Chadwick, Richard V., A. M. 
Dean, John S. W., A. M. 
Howell, Wm. M„ A. M. 
Jacobs, Ttios. P., A. M. 



1871. 

Jolliffe, Wm. E., A. M. 

1872. 

Smith, Bex.t. W., A. M. 
White, I. C., A. M. 

1873. 

McClure, Taylor B„ M. S. 
Price, Thomas H., M. S. M. D. 
Pritchard, Wm. T., M. 8. 
Purinton, Daniel B., A. M. 
Temple, Marcellus L., A. M. 
Waters, James T., A. M. 

1874. 

Lynch, Chas. W., A. M. 
Morax, Ellsworth E., A. M. 
Woods, Fraxk, A. M. 



1875. 



Adams, Samuel Shugert, A. M. 
Dolliver, B. H., A. M. 
Dolliver, J. P., A. M. 
Goldex, Franklin A., B. 8. 

Axdersox, Johx C, B. S. 
Frasher, Luke H., A. B. 
Hubbard, Harry Dana, B. S. 
Isox, Willey Owens, A. B. 
Kemp, Howard Mason, B. S. 

& 



Martin, James V., A. M. 
Peterson, J. J., A. M. 
Purixtox, A. L., A. M. 

1876. 

Laidley, George Summers, B. S. 
Nash, James Hexry, B. 8. 
Ramage, Thomas C, B. S. 
Wetzel, Daxiel Elliot, A. B. 



£ 



WEST vil;.. 



18', 

Bbown, Wili i \m ( >.\v, A. B. 
Dille, Clarence B., A. B. 
Hawthorne, Joseph II.. A. B. 

Hood. THOM \- M . . A. B. 

Rogers, Daniel R., A. B. 

/n;n. 

CJourtney, Alphei s r.. B. S. Mob 

Dayton, Alston Gordon, A Mai 

.. B, Rich, Daniei , A. B. 



\ . i 






• 



2 ^ 



3* <£ 

10 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



n^txmcn^nuitB 



Seniors. 

Purinton, George Dana Class-.Morgantown. 

Kogers, William A Class..Decatur, 111. 

Wade, Spencee S Sci.... Morgantown. 

Juniors. 

*Davisson, Ithamar .Sci ....Webster, Taylor Co. 

Grafton, Charles Edwin Sci New Cumberland, Hancock Co. 

*Haymond, Frank Thompson...Sci Morgantown. 

Keenan. B. L Sci Maidsville, Monongalia Co. 

Marsh, John Nelson Classi.Morgantown. 

Pearre, Geo. A. Jr ....Class-Cumberland, Md. 

-Waters, A. A Class.Xaurel Point, Monongalia Co. 

Sophomores. 

-Chancellor, E. P. Ju Class..Parkersburg. 

Glascock, J. L Class..Grafton, Taylor Co. 

Hodges, Titos. E Class..French Creek, Upshur Co. 

Hyland, Wm. M Class..SilverHill,Prince George's Co.,Md. 

*Lowther, Sylvester Class»Morgantown. 

*Seamon, Wm. Henry Sci Wheeling. 

Freshmen. 

* Allen, George Roberts Sci. ....Grafton, Taylor Co. 

Anderson, William Franklin.. Class..Easton, Monongalia Co, 

:: Blackiston, Thomas Coppek...Sci Piedmont, Mineral Co. 

- 1 - Blackford, Godwin L Class..Parkersburg. 

Brown, Zalmon Kent < Class..Morgantown. 

Chapman, John Warner .Class.. Warsaw, la. 



Y?)\ Class— Classical Course. Sci.— Scientific Course. "^-Conditioned. /&[ 



& 



3T VIRGINIA I 



J 



freshmen 

Coubtney, David 11 mi ( 

vnk 

Freeman, Hakkv Smith Class-Clarksburg, Hai 

Haymoni Hiram I antown. 

•Jeffries, Elias Dick Class^Arbuc 

Jenkins, Oscar Sci I 

. Barton Morris Class~Laure1 

Lawhead, .1 \mi:sHi:\kn ....Sci...«Morgantown. 

Lewis, i C Cla i sburg, Hai 

Oqden, HowardN Clate..Fairm 

■ Pearre, James Graham ..Clas8..Cumberland, Md. 

lM , Ashby Jackson Class..Parkersbui 

Camden Sci Clarksburg, Hai 

►Woodford, Alonzo Harvey.. ..Class..Pleasa] I 

Optional Students. 

Boyd, Thos. Rogers Galva, 111. 

:un: 1 Fairmont. 

Hai. i. sper.. -.Morgantown. 

Henry, Chas. 0. O'D Newburg, Prestoi i 

,.. Walter ..Morgantown. 

Hustead, Ashbel Fadschdld Morgantown. 

Macbeth, J. E Morgantown. 

McViOKER, E. A Morgantown. 




& 



. - 



S*" 



12 



"^ 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Wv^itm-muul f&txutevcti 



Thompson, William R, 



.Hinton, Summers count v 



Basnett, H. S Basnettville, Marion county. 

Brown, R. L. P Morgantown. % 

Courtney, A. F Randall, Monongalia county. 

Fitch, Dorsey Plummer Morgantown. 

Gatewood, D. C Gladesville, Preston county. 

Glenn, C. F Morgantown. 

Grafton, C. E New Cumberland, Hancock county, 

Haymond, F. F.. Morgantown. 

Hustead, A. F.... ... Morgantown. 

Keenan, B. L • Maidsville, Monongalia county. 

Lorentz, C. F ...Morgantown. 

Marsh, J. X. Morgantown. 

Meeks, F. Iv. S Hartford City, Mason county. 

Ogden, H. N --.- Fairmont, Marion county. 

Pearre, Geo. A ...Cumberland, Md. 

Rogers, D. R Morgantown. 

Tanzey, A. E Ulnngton, Monongalia county. 

Waters, A. A Laurel Point Monongalia county. 



& 



£ 



WEST VIRGINIA I Nl\ 



'vc^nvaiovi] gcip&rfmeut* 



P-'^-CTJXjT-S". 



Rev. J. R. THOMPSON, A. M.. 
A. \\\ LORENTZ, A. ML, 

Principal. 

MAJOR THOS. F.SNYDER, 

imandant of Cadeto. 

I). B. PURINTON, A. M., SECRETARY 

Instructor in Vocal Musi 

JAMES S. STEWART, B. 

itant. 



& 



£ 



14 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



— <^ ■■()• Of ^s— 

Senior Year- 

Anderson, Elislia Hoffman Eastern, Monongalia Co. 

Bailey, William Henry Pleasant Valley, Monongalia Co. 

Baker, George Coleman Morgantown. 

Basnett, Hillard Samuel Basnettsville, Marion Co. 

Boyers, Luther M Randall, Monongalia Co. 

Brand, Edward Parish Laurel Point, Monongalia Co. 

Camden, Richard Pindle Weston, Lewis Co. 

Chidester, Granville Montcalm Baltimore, Lewis Co. 

Devine, Joseph McMurry Wheeling. 

Dickson, John Robert...... Morgantown. 

Gambrill, George Kincheloe Parkersburg, Wood Co. 

Glenn, Charles Fletcher Morgantown. 

Henry, James Sycamore Dale, Harrison Co. 

Hood, Smith, Lowsville, Monongalia Co. 

Hopkins, Charles Ellis Morgantown. 

Houston, Waitman Willey Morgantown. 

Johnston, John L Pentress, Monongalia Co. 

Kelly, Samuel Chestnut .Morgantown. 

Kelly, George Macklen Morgantown. 

Lazzell, Luther James Maidsville, Monongalia Co. 

Lazzell, Isaac Grant Maidsville, Monongalia Co. 

Lorentz, Charles Frederick Morgantown. 

Lowther, Lloyd Alonzo Sistersville, Tyler Co. 

McCarty, Norval Bushrod Lumberport, Harrison Co. 

Meeks, Francis Kirk Hartford City, Mason Co. 

Morris, Henry Perry Morgantown. 

Morris, George Washington Morgantown. 

Musgrave, John Edgar West Columbia, Mason Co. 

Xefflen, Paul Herman Piedmont, Mineral Co. 

Patton, John Romine's Mills Harrison Co. 

Price, Allen Reed.. r"ffington, Monongalia Co. 

Purnell, Frank Morgan Bellaire, Ohio. 

Sisler, Lorenzo Dow Stewarttown, Monongalia Co. 

& £ 



5£ 






SENIOI 

Samsel, John Grove 

Stewart, .lam— Henry 

Suter Eli Painter 

Tap]-, William Whitfield M 

Charles AT" 

Wiley, William Anderson.. ...W 

Williard, Joseph Combe La 



Junior Year. 

Armstrong, Roberl 1 

Arnett, Calvin W Laurel Point, M 

Bainbridge, Samuel Alpheus [ronton 

Bowyer, G antrell Winfield, Putnai 

Brand, George Emmetl 

Car-ill, Samuel Glover Winfield, Put 

Chapman, William Cray Warsaw, In. liana. 

Clabaugh, Jacob Nathaniel Berkele 

Wheeler M Evansvil 

Crummett, Simon Peter Harrisville, Ritchie ( 

Davis, Charles Sprigg Oakland, Md. 

Davis, William Craft Oakland, Md. 

Gatewood, De WittClinton Gladesville, 

_, Charles Taylor- Morgantown. 

Hart, William Hampton Maidsville, Monoi 

Hare, Alfred Jarrett Morgantown. 

Hawthorne, .lames Edmund Randall, Monoi 

Hayes, Henry Hervit Morgantown. 

Heaton, William Halleck Harrisvill* 

Henry, James C Kewbu 

Hulsizer, Frank P. Washington, W 

Huston, Chauncey Wait man. Morgantown 

Kci-m-r, Waitman Willey intown. 

Koontz, Omer 11 intown. 

Jamison, fred Laurel Point, M 

Lazier, Harrison Williams ...Morgantown. 

ge Hay Clark* 



-j 



16 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



JUNIOR YEAR— Continued. 

McVicker, John Clarence Morgantown. 

McVicker, Clark ... Morgantown. 

Michael, Walter Howard. Bruceton Mills, Preston Co. 

Parfitt, George Easton, Monongalia ( 

Patton. Daniel Boughner Harrisville, Ritchie Co. 

Ralphsnyder, Lafayette Cedar Valley, Monongalia Co. 

Reed, David K Grafton, Taylor Co. 

1, John Donley St. Cloud. Monongalia Co. 

Sisler, John Lot Stewarttown, Monongalia Co. 

Sisler, Benjamin Franklin Stewarttown. Monongalia ( 

Smell, Albert Easton, Monongalia Co. 

Smith, Jasper Washington.. Maidsvilie, Monongalia Co. 

Townshend, Arthur Oakland, Md. 

Vance, Robert A Morgantown. 

Vandervort, James Hare Morgantown. 

Walls, George A Bruceton Mills. Preston Co. 

Waters, Otis Watson. Randall, Monongalia Co. 

Yates, Edward G Clarksburg. Han 













& & 



WEST VIRGINIA 1 1 ' 



^J1^)jS^S^SJ^j^^1L 



Seniors... 

Juniors ,. 

Sophomores 

Freshmen 

Optional Students.. 

Law Students •• 

Medical Students 

Senior Preparatory Students 

Junior Preparatory Students 



Deduct for those counted more than one 



Total 



ntulation by States. 



West Virginia 

Maryland 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Ohio 

Pennsylvania. 
New Jersey.... 



Total. 



The following is an exjribil of the number of student* 
nually from the beginning: 

The year 1867 -8, shows a total of 124. 

>l of 154. 

; Ml. 

iows a total of 166. 

year 1871-2, Bhows a total of 159. 

The yeai hows a total of 14-1. 

Tip- year 1874-5, Bhows a total of 125. 
The year 1875 

Tin- year 1876-7, Bhows a total - 
The year 1877-8, Bhows a total o 
Thepresenl year, L878-9, Bhows a to1 



& 









1 



,1 an- 



O 



3£ ~<£ 

18 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



ilitai) Sep&rtwxeuJ: > 



FACULTT. 



REV. J. R. THOMPSON, A. M. 
President. 

MAJOE THOS. F, SNYDER, 

Commandant. 



The terms of the United States appropriation, require military instruc- 
tion. 

For the better instruction in infantry tactics and military police and 
discipline, the Cadets have been consolidated into one company, under 
the command of the Commandant of Cadets. The officers and non-com- 
missioned officers are selected from those Cadets, who have been most 
active and soldier-like in the performance of their duties, and most 
exemplary in their general deportment. 



COMlvIISSIOlTED OFFICERS. 

Captain. 

Cadet B. L. KEENAN. 

Lieutenants. 
Cadet C. E. GRAFTON, First Lieutenant. 
Cadet A. L. COX, First Lieutenant. 

Cadet W. H. SEAMON, Second Lieutenant and Adjutant. 
Cadet T. E. HODGES, Second Lieutenant and Ordnance Officer. 



& . & 



& 












Hi V £S 'JL'IB l£i V LF 3 IL'iXIL 1 JS I; illD IE Li' £j 



Non- Commissioned OffU 

W. M. PTtland I nt. 

Cadet < i. A. Pe urre, Sergeant. 
Cadet C. < >. <>'l>. Hi ant. 

( !adet J. N. Mabsh, Sergeant. 
( !adet J. L. Glascock, Color Sergeant. 

Cadet IT. S. Freeh al. 

Cadet E. P. ( "n am i u.<n:. < lorporal. 

Cadet T. C. Bla< kiston, < brporal. 

Cadet (i. <'. Lewis, Corporal. 



District. 



Name 



1 Char afton.. 

VV. II. Seamon 



Vacancy 





II KM \RK.« 






< rraduafc d 

i,i for du1 

.t for dul 



III 



IV 



& 



I duty 

Killiard S. Basnett.... \ 

• dun 

oden Somniers I 

ward X. « >gden ! 

ii Pr - in for duty 

- Henrv I >i~«li 









: 


























n\ for dut' 



L. II. 

cancy 



: 



I Win. M. Hyland 

' I-:. P. Chancellor, Jr.. 

J Smith 

(,. K. Gambrill Preaenl for dut 

V r acancy 



duty 
i for duty, 
t for duty 






- 



^ J 



^ 



20 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



ROSTER OF STATE CADETS-Continued. 



No. of 

District. 



Name 



Remarks. 



V. 



VI. 



YJI. 



VIII. 



IX. 



XI. 



& 



[ Frank K. Meeks Present for 

i S. G. Cargill Present for 

-j R.Armstrong Present for 

j Vacancy j 

[Vacancy 



duty 
duty 

(lllt'v 



When Enlisted 
or Discharged. 



Oct. 

Oct. 

April 



5, 1877 
2, 1878 

I!. L879 



Elias D. Jeffries Present for duty Sept. 14, 1877 

Lorenzo D. Sisler Present for duty Oct. 5, 1877 

j Jas. H. Stewart Present for duty Sept. 20, 1878 

| George C. Bowyer Honorably discharged... March 15, 1879 

I John E. Musgrave Present for duty April 11, 1S7 ( .» 

[John L. Johnston Present for duty April 11, 1879 



! A. F. Courtncv.. 

I B. L. Keenan 

I A. H. Woodford. 
' Smith Hood 



.. ( graduated 

.. Present for duty.. 

.. Honorably discharged 
.. Present for dutv 



Vacancy |. 

Vacancy 

Vacancy 



J tine 27, 1878 

March 30, 1877 

Jan. 8, 1879 

.March 10, 1879 



I .Jas. C. Williard Present for dutv Feb. 1. 1878 

IGeo.C.Baker Present for dutv March 8, 1878 

! G. W. Chidester Present for dutv vpril 19, 1878 

D. C. Gatewood Present lor duty March 28, 1879 

[Vacancy 

i A. (t. Davton Graduated June 27. 1878 

' ('. 1-:. Hopkins Discharged Feb. 1, 1879 

| G.M. Kellv Present tor duty Sept. 14, 1877 

j T. E. Hodges Present for dutv Sept. 14, 1S77 

I D. K. Heed Absent on furlough Feb. 28, 1879 

I Vacancy •• , 



Enoch .1. Marsh. Graduated. 

S. C. Kellv Discharged, 

Chas. O. 6'D. Henry.. Present' for 

! I). H. Courtney Present for 

j Vacancy 

I Vacancy 

[Vacancy 



duty 

dutv 



. June 27, 1878 

.. March 14. 1879 

.. April 15, 1877 

.. Sept. 14. 1877 



(Daniel Rich Graduated June 27, 1878 

I T. 0. Blaekiston Present for dutv Sept. 14, 1877 

| P. H. Xefflen Present for duty Sept. 20, 1878 

j John Patton Present tor duty Oct. 25, 1878 

| Vacancy 

I Vacancy 



VIRGINIA l S 



f I 



ROSTER OF - 



\ 

District. 



X ami:. 



I! 



XII. 



B. S. M< 

j J. X. Marsh 

| <;. I.. Blackford... 

Jas. V. 11 



I lon< 



R. P. Camden 

incy 

ino 



Pay Cadets. 



X \MT. 



. 



( ,. \. Pearre 

.).(,. p irre 

OscarJenkin* I' 

I . \. Wever P 

F. Purnell ■'•' - 




























































Distin $u ish ed Cadets 



X IME. 



A. F. Courtney 

A. G. Davtoni 

.1. M. Lee 

E. . I.! Marsh 

B. S. Morgan 

1). Rich 

C. E. < rrafton 

B. L. Keenan 

J.N. Marsh 

c. o. oh. Henrv.. 
T. E. U 

W. M. Hvland 

\. L.C a 

W. II. Seanion 



Mil. 1 1 no 



Militan . 
Militan . 
Military. 

Military. 
Military. 
Militan . 
Military. 

: 



1 

i 
i 

i 

* 



i 

i 



uiii. 



cordanoe with the regulations e. 

I as distinguished in ih '«« |» 

baviug attained a yearly a 



8 



o 



22 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



^5 



18 7 8-9. 



JOHN J. McLEAN, Signal Corps, U. S. A.. 
Instructor. 

Cabaugh, J. X Telegraphy 

Dickens, J. R Telegraphy 

Lamrel, J. G Telegraphy 

McVicker, C Telegraphy 

Chapman, W. J Telegraphy 

Lazier, H Telegraphy 

Meeks, F. K Telegraphy 

Eked. D. K Telegraphy 

Cargile, S. G Signaling. 

Hough, W.M Signaling. 

Freeman, H. S Signaling. 

Cox, F Sign aling. 

Smith, A. J Signaling. 

Blackford, .1. L Signaling. 

Pearre, J. G Signaling:. 



3* & 



&" 



VIRGIN] 



f l 






moral glttsk 



D. B. PUEINTON, A. M . : 

Sonic years ago, the Regents added V< Studies 

of the University. It is open, free ol charge, to I 
all departments alike. The course oi Instruction embn 
year, as tollo 

Fall Term — Rudiments and Elementary Pracl 

Winter Term — Rudiments continued. Glee and Chorus 
Singing. 

Sprin<- Term — Lectures on Harmony and Composition, Chorus 
Singing, Review, &c. 



Stu 
♦Anderson, W. F. 


dents. 

B. M 


Baker, l 


wther, L . 


Bailey, W. II. 


psh, J. N. 


Blackiston, T. C. 


Meeks, F. K. 


Brand, E. P. 


Patton, J. 


Brai- 


pre, J. ( «. 


Camden, R. P. 


Burnell, F. M 


Courtney, D. H. 


Ralphs n 


Cox, LL. 


i. !>.' k. 


Crummett, S. B. 


er, L. D. 


Davis W. C. 


Stewarl 


De-vine. J. ML. 


tier, E. 1'. 


*Glenn, C. F. 


Dsbend, . 


*Henry, - 


Vance, !»'. A. 


*Hodees, T. E 


♦Walters, A. A 


♦Hopkins C. E. 


Willard 


♦Jeffries, 


Yates, 1 



& 






& 



"^ 



24 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



aurse of %txul 



The instruction thus far provided for in the University is embraced in 
six departments, viz: The Classical, Scientific, Agricultural, Engineering, 
Military ; and tor those desiring to qualify themselves for regular admis- 
sion to any of these, a Preparatory Department. No study has been dropped 
from any of these Departments, but the method of stating what is required 
in each, has been simplified in the present Catalogue. 

T. 

Plassical Depar/tment. 

The studies in this Department, required for the Degree of Bachelor of 

Arts, are as follows : 

Freshman Year. 

FIRST TERM. 

Virgil — Bucolics andGeorgics; Prose Composition. Gildersleeve's Gram- 
mar and Exercise Hook. 
Herodotus; Greek Prose Composition and Greek Grammar. 

Universal History — Anderson. 
University Algebra — Robinson. 

Elocution. 

SECOND TERM. 

Horace — Odes and Epodes ; Latin Prose Composition (continued). 

Homer — Iliad; Greek Prose Composition (continued). 

English Literature — Shaw. 

Geometry (completed i ; Solid and Plane Trigonometry (commenced). 

Elocution. 

THIRD TERM. 

Cicero — De Senectute and De Amicitia; Exercises in Latin Prose Composi- 
tion. 

Homer — Odyssey; Prose Composition. 

Constitution of the United States and of West Virginia. 

Plane Trigonometry (completed) ; Spherical Geometry and Trigonometry. 

Elocution. 

& & 



WEST VIRG ' 



phomore Year* 

F1B8T 

Xenophon -Memoi 
en. 

Mensuration ; Sun ion. 

Chemistry, [norgantic Eliol and Si 
Elocution. 

SECOND TERM. 

1 1 . . : - <1 EpistL - 

ish Philo 
Analvtical Geometry and Differential < alculus : 
Chemistry < >rg tnic. 
Elocution. 

THIRD TERM. 
Livy Lincoln ; Y.\ ion. 

Plato ( rito and A.polog) : E 
Botany- < rray. 

gral ( Jalculua Loomis, I >ptioi 
Elocution. 

Junior Year. 

FIRST TERM. 

Euripides 1 \!< ■■ stie ; or French. 
Mental Philosophy ; The In; iven, and L 

Phys ral Principles Solids and Flui 

Physical ( reogr ph; i 

SECOND TERM. 
Tacitus Germania and Agricola; Latin Composition ; ( 
Philosophy; The Sensibiliti. - and tfa Wil 11 
Physics Pneumatics, Acoustics, Optics. 
Nicholson. 

THIRD TERM. 

Demosthen - • i the < rown, with Written Ea 
Phyg elation of Forces, Electr 

Logic — ( loppee. 
lluinan Anatomy and Physiology- Di 

Senior Year 

FIRST TBB 
Cic Officiis; with Writtei 

man. 

I Philosophy Wayland. 
History of < !ivilization ' rui 

ology, Lithological, Dynamical and Hist 
ical Excursions. 

&> • 



& ~~t& 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



SECOND TERM. 

Sophocles — (CEdipus Tyrannus ; or German. 
Elements of Criticism — Lord Raines. 
Astronomy — Newcomb. 
International Law — Woolsey. 

THIRD TERM. 
Political Economy — Bowen. 
Tacitus — Annals ; or German. 
A>i ronomy { completed). 

Christian Evidences ; Lectures by the President. 

If, in this Department, the student selects the French or German instead 
of the Latin or Greek, he shall be required to study them respectively, dur- 
ing three successive terms, and such selection must be made at the begin- 
ning of the Junior or Senior Year. The text books for the Junior Year are 
the same as those of the Scientific Freshmen, and for the Senior Year, the 
same as Junior Scientific. 



P 



II. 
CIENTIFIC PEPARTMENT. 



The studies in this Department required for the Degree of Bachelor of 
Seienee are the following : 

Freshman Year. 

FIRST TERM. 

University Algebra — Robinson. 

French — Languellier and Monsanto's French Course. 

Universal History — Anderson. 

Chemistry (Inorganic) — Eliot and Storer. 

Elocution. 

SECOND TERM. 

Geometry (completed), Solid and Plane Trigonometry (commenced). 

French — French Course ( continued); French Reader. 

English Lit era t u re — Sh a w . 

Chemistry (Organic). 

Elocution. 

THIRD TERM. 

Plane Trigonometry (completed) — Spherical Geometry and Trigonom- 
etry. 
French — French Course (completed) ; Telemaque (Surenne's). 
Constitution of the United States, and of West Virginia. 
Botany —Gray's Sehool and Field Book. 
Elocution. 

& £ 



gr g 



WEST VIRGINIA IN!\I 



Sophomore Year, 

FIRST TERM. 

Mensuration, Surveying and Navigation Robii 

French- -Voltaire, Charles XII., FVench Grammar and I 

Rhetoric Baven. 

Physics, General Principles Solids and Flui< 

Elocution. 

SECOND TEKM. 

Ajaalytical Geometry, and Differential Calculuf I • 

French, Classic Play6 Joynes; Grammar and I 

Chemical Anal;. 

Physics Undulations, Acoustics, Optics, Problem*. 

Elocution. 

THIRD TERM. 

Agriculture. 

[ntegral < Jalculue Loomis. 

French (Optional) Pylodet's Classic Literature. 

Physics Beat; Magnetic, Statical an.l Dynamical Electricity. 

Chemical Analysis. 

Elocution 

Junior Year. 

FIRST TERM 

Meteorology. 

German —Woodbury's Complete Course. 

Mental Philosophy, The [ntellecf Baven, and L*c1 

Physical Geography Guyot. 

SECOND TERM. 

Analytical Mechanics Peck. 

( lerman ( rrammar (continued I ; ( Jerman Reader. 

Zoology Nicholson. 

Mental Philosophy The Sensibilitiefl and the Will II 

tu: • 

THIRD TERM. 

Minereology Dana's Manual. 
German Grammar and Free K 

Stuart. 
Logic Coppee. 
Iluiiian Anatomy and Physiolog) Draper. 



^ 



5* *& 

28 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 

Senior Year. 

FIRST TEEM. 

Moral Philosophy — Wayland. 

German — Goethe's Iphigenia in Tauris, or Egmont ; Grammar and Exer- 
cises. 

History of Civilization — Guizot. 

Geology — Lithological, Dynamical and Historical — LeConte, with Geolog- 
ical Excursions. 

SECOND TERM. 

International Law — Woolsey. 

German — Fouque's Undine ; Grammar and Exercises. 

Elements of Criticism — Lord Karnes. 

Astronomy — Descriptive and Physical. 

THIRD TERM. 

Evidences of Christianity — Lectures by the President. 

Political Economy — Bo wen. 

German — (Optional)— Evans' German Literature ; Grammar and Exer- 
cises. 

Practical Astronomy— Calculation and Construction of Eclipses, verified by 
the Nautical Almanac. 

Geology— LeConte. 

III. 

Deparjment of Engineering. 

The studies in this Department for the first, second and third years are 
the same as in the Scientific Course. For the Senior year they are as fol- 
lows : 

FIRST TERM. 
Civil Engineering— Mahan. 
Moral Philosophy -Wayland. 
Physical Geography — (Guyot. ) 

Geology — Lithological, Historical and Dynamical — LeConte, with Geolog- 
ical Excursion. 

SECOND TERM. 

Military Engineering— Mahan. 
Astronomy Descriptive and Physical. 
International Law— Woolsey. 
Elements of Criticism — Karnes. 

& & 






VIRGINIA l Nr 



THIRD TERM. 



Gillespie <>n the Location, Construction and Imp 

Railroads. 
Astronomy Practical. 
Evidences <>t" Christianity ; Lectures by the Pit xident. 

The studio of the Modern I 
Ooui 

In addition to the text 

js, they are required t<> read a pr 
write exercises, both by dictation and translation, ii 
man. 

IV. 

Military Department. 

In addition i. » the daily drills as Infantn or Utility, 1 1 ■ • - I 
theoretically instructed in Military Science as folio 

FIRST YEAR. 

FerotTerm [nfantry Tactics ; School of theSoldier; School of ■ I 

jianv. 

stdTebm [nstruction for Skirmishers ; Battalion Drill. 
Third Term Brigade Drill ; Military Signaling i 

SECOND YEAR. 

Perot Term Cavalry Tactics. 

\i> Term -Military Bistory. 
Third Term Artillery Tactics. 

THIRD YEAR 

Ferot Term- Vxtillery Tact:.- (conclm 

»d TERM-Military Engineering Ernst's); Fi< I 

hai 
Thebd Term Advance Guard and Outposl Dutj M 

FOURTH YEAR. 

FerotTerm Strategy and Art of War. 

i, Term- Ordnance and Gunr 
Therd Term— Military Law and C 

1 
dienl throughool the entir 
The other studiefl in this Departmenl 
Scientific Departments respecti 

-J 



i£> 



^0 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Y. 

^g^icultui^al Department. 

The studies of this Department are, at present, embraced in a two rears' 
course. Students having creditably completed this course, will be entitled 
to receive a certificate to that effect. 

First Year. 

FIRST TERM. 

Inorganic Chemistry. 
Physics — Solids and Fluids. 
General History. 
French or German (Optional). 

SECOND TERM. 

Organic Chemistry ; Zoology. 

English literature. 

French or German (Optional.) 

THIRD TERM. 

Botany and Vegetable Physiology. 

Heat, Magnetism and Electricity. 

Plane Trigonometry. 

Constitution of the United States, and of West Virginia. 

Second Year. 

FIRST TERM. 

Analytical Chemistry, Geology, Meteorology. 
Chain and Compass Surveying. 

SECOND TERM. 

Analysis of Soils ; Entomology. 

Astronomy. 

French or German (Optional >, 

THIRD TERM. 

Allen's Farm Book. 

Gillespie, on Boads and Road Making. 

Political Economy. 

Evidences of Christianity ; Lectures by the President. 

The Subjects for Lectures during the Course, are the following : 

£> & 



5* 8 

WI>T VIRGINIA INI VI 



First ) 






The < Ihemistry, Structure and Physio 
On tin- Water, Atmosphere and - 
On Tillage, Draining and Manuring. 

SECOND TERM. 

On Domestic Animal- and their Digestion, R 

Excretion. 
On the Composition, Preparation and Va 
On Milk, Butter, Ch »h and W< 

THIRD TERM. 

On Horticultural and Kitchen Gardening. 

On the Propagation, Training and Culture of Fruit Tree*, the Vii , h 
Fruits and Vegetables, 

Second Year. 

FIRST TERM, 
On the Staple Grain, Forage, Root, and Fibre Corps of thi* 

States, and their Varieties, and th< "•'"• 

On the Preparation of Soil, Seeding, Cultn 

ing for Market. 
On the Origin and Natural History of Domestic Vnim 
On Entomology, and the insects Useful and Hurtful to Vegetation. 

SECOND TERM. 

On the Raising, Care, Characteristics and Ada,..i i Diffei 

I domestic Animal-. 

On Cattle for B it, and Sheep for Wool or Mutton. 

On Horses, Swine and Poultry. 

( >u Pasturing, Soiling and Stall Feeding. 

On Tobacco, Hops and Forestry. 

THIRD TERM. 

On Rural Economy. , 

On tin- History of \griculture, with th 

modern times; and in foreign land-. 
On the Adaptation of Fannin- to Soil, Clima 

and Economical Condition-. 
On th. Different Systems of Husbandry, *uch as S 

Mixed Farming. 



& 



32 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



t|AW ^EPAKTMENT. 

MATRICULATION FEE $15. 

The instruction in this Department is given pa rtly through Text Books 
and partly through Lectures r there are daily examinations upon the text, 
and the lectures. These examinations are oral and are upon the text, and 
the lectures of the preceding day. This session is of three months dura- 
tion. The course of study is as follow- : 

COMMON AND STATUTE LAW, 
Blackstone's Commentaries and Stephens on Pleading, 4th Vol. Kent's 
Commentaries. g^TFor Reference, Code of West Virginia, and the 
Revised Statutes of the United States. 

EQUITY, EVIDENCE, MERCANTILES AND CONSTITUTIONAL 

LAWS. 

Adam's Equity, Greenleaf on Evidence (1st Volume). 
Smith's Mercantile Law and the Federalist. 

The above full course of study will only be completed in the event of the 
Board of Regents extending the session of the Law Department to nine 
month s. 

fvfEDiCAL Department. 

The Board of Regents, at i.ts annual meeting in June last established 
a Chair of Anatomy, Physiology and Hygiene, and elected as Professor in 
this Department. Hugh A. Bbock, M. D., of Morgantown, whose Course of 
Instruction, it was enacted, should occupy one of the three terms of the Uni- 
versity year. 

This chair was designed by the Board to teach the Students of the Uni- 
versity a more accurate and thorough knowledge of thestructure and oi 
izationof the human body and of the law. of health than is ordinarily 
taught in the usual college cou 

^ It was designed also to serve as a nucleus around which, it is hoped, a 
fully organized .Medical Department, in connection with the University, 
will at no distant day be establish 

Pursuant to this action of the Board, Dr. Brock entered upon his duties 
at the beginning of the Spring term of the present year, during which he 
has given daily lectures to a class of eighteen Students on Anatomv, Phv- 
siology and Hygiene, illustrating his oral instruction by diagrams upon the 
blackboard, by Anatomical plates, by Anatomical preparations wet and 
dry, and by dissections upon the dead body made by himself either in the 
presence of the class or immediately before each lecture. Endeavoring to 
carry out the object of the Board, he has, in addition to his lectures upon 

&- £ 



5T~ *& 

WE8T VIRGINIA l'M\ I ELS 



Descriptive Anatomy, taught much of M 
plaining the different forms of disease to whi< I 
Btrating upon this subject the various important - 
body, and, in connection therewith, performii 
ence oi the • I iss, most of the n 
otomy, herniotomy, tracheotomy, division oi tend, 
biamua and clubfoot, amputations, resection* 
Minute Anatomy has been taughl b> tl 
The Anatomical elements of the solid tissu 
also many interesting and beautiful ph; 
circulation of the blood in thi andciliai 

the Bpermatazoa, epithelium from tl 
Bel and many different forms of [nl 
the microscope. 

[n cases where it was practicable to do so patients from pi 
have been brought before in mined an. 

cal lectures delivered upon th with which th< 

aicted. Several important Surgical operations upon privaU 
been performed before the da—. 

The method of examining the urine and otl 
state of disease as well as of health have been taught, ehemicalh and n 
scopically. 

[n the lectures upon Physiology and Hygiene the .... 
each organ and the body as a whole in a state of health have been imp 
oi apon the mind of the student. 

The interest taken by the members of the claw in the - 
partment of the University, as manifested b) 
upon and close attention to the Lectur 
hensionof the instruction imparted, as 
tl) W hich they are subjected upon the topics of the u 
been highlv gratifving to their [nstructor and has full) 
wisdom of *the Board of Regents in establishing this Department »1 the 
University. 
The Class composing the Medical Department is • 
- -Of Members of the Junior Class who 
omy and Physiology, in course, during the Junior Y, 

«>LY-Ofsuch State Cadets ae 
partment and who are recommended by the Facultj 
atory study to >' 
Tllll:1(I .v Of Medical Students, proper, 



in anv 



other Department of the Uni 



ghteen members composing the |»i 
dents of Medicine. 

Neither Juniors nor Cadets are required to pay am additio. 
already paid as regular students of the I niv< 



34 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



All others are required to pay a fee of ten dollars for admission to the 
Lectures. 

The same Course of Instruction given during the present year will be 
given during the Spring Term of the University Year of 1879-80. 

For such Students of Medicine who, on account of limited means or time, 
are not prepared to take a full College Course but who desire to take, in 
connection with Medicine, studies in other departments of the University 
which are germane to and essentially necessary to an intelligent study of 
Medicine as a Science, for example, an Elementary Course in Latin and 
Creek and a Course in Chemistry, special and favorable provision will be 
made. 



£> £ 



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36 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Preparatory Department. 
Junior Year. 

FIRST TERM. 

Geography — Guyot's Common School ; Map Drawing. 
Arithmetic— Stoddard's Complete. 
English Grammar — Etymology. 
Latin (commenced), 

SECOND TERM. 

Geography — Guyot (continued) ; Map Drawing. 
Arithmetic (continued). 
English Grammar — Syntax. 
Latin— Grammar and Reader. 

THIRD TERM. 

Arithmetic (completed). 

English Grammar— Analysis of Sentences. 

Latin— Grammar and Readers. 

Greek — Bullion's First Lessons. 

Senior Year. 

FIRST TERM. 

Algebra— Rohinson's Elementary, to Involution. 

Book-keeping. 

Caesar (two hooks)— Latin Grammar. 

Greek — Grammar and Reader. 

SECOND TERM. 

Algebra— Robinson's Elementary (completed). 

History of the United States— Anderson's. 

Cicero's Orations (three orations)— Bullion's Latin Grammar. 

Greek — Grammar and Reader. 

THIRD TERM. 

Geometry— Robinson (first four books). 
History of the United States (completed). 
Yirgil— Three Books of jEneid; Latin Grammar. 
Xenophon's Anabasis (two books) ; Greek Grammar. 

Regular lessons in Writing, Spelling, Elocution and English Composi- 
tion from beginning. 

& £ 



WEST VIRGINIA I'M VI 



The course preparatory to il - 
tary Department* i- the same as the 
Manual, Physiology, Natural Philosophy 
tic, each one term respectively, for th 

The Btudies preparatory to th< 
follow- : 

First Term — Algebra ; Arithmetic ; < rramm 
ond Term— \L< bra ; Arithmetic \K iram 
Third Term— < reometry ; Arithmetic ; I 






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38 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



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FOUNDATION OF THE I NIVER8ITY 

The West Virginia University owi 
bounty of the United States Government, the 1 
ginia, and the citizens of Morgantown. On tl 
United States Congress passed an act granting public lands 
States and Territories which should provide 5 
Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. Under this ict, thirty tl 
for each of its Senators and Representatives in I 
ated to this State. The proceeds of the sale of tl 
lands amounted to $90,000. 

The Constitution of West Virginia makes it the duty 
latme to "foster and encourage Moral, [ntellectual, Scientific and \ 
cultural improvements ; and to make provision for the oi 
auch institutions of learning as the best ii 
may demand." The National gift was, the 
latnre, and a Board appointed to organize the Institution, wit) 
tions to "establish Departments of Education in I 
Art, Agriculture and Military Tactics includin 
ment." 

The Legislature, realizing the value of such an [nsl 
worth to the State and Nation, its indispei 
mountain Commonwealth, and in pursuan 
has increased the endowment to about $110,000, witl 
tions for current and contingent expena 
Bional grant can be applied to the erection of buildii 
being allowed for the purchase of an experimental 
ture has also made provision for the supply and keep 
buildings as the growth ol the Institution may, from tin 
mand. Every interest of West Virginia requin 
sons the besl possible educational advantages within 
For the development of West Virgin 
West Virginia brain should beeducated on Wesl 



& 



40 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



The citizens of Morgantown, noted for their generosity and keen ap- 
preciation of educational advantages, contributed in grounds, buildings 
and money, about $50,000. 

The University stands, therefore, in important relations to the Nation 
and State, and is bound to the sacred performance of all duties growing 
out of these relations. 

NAME AND GOVERNMENT. 

At the beginning, in common with some other National Colleges, it 
was simply called the "Agricultural College." Having been, however, 
fully adopted by the State, and the means originally supplied to aid in 
its establishment being further supplemented by the Legislature, an act 
was passed, pursuant to the recommendation of the Governor, ordering 
that it should thereafter be known by the style and designation of 
"West Virginia University." It is under the immediate oversight of 
a Board of twelve Regents, one from each Senatorial district, appointed 
by the Governor, and required to report biennially, through the Gov- 
ernor to the Legislature. The bitterness of partisan and sectarian dis- 
putes is excluded from its halls, and every effort made to secure to each 
student the full advantage of a broad and manly culture. 

SCOPE. 
This is entirely in accord with the original design of the institution, 
as seen in the first paragraph of these "General Remarks." The act of 

Congress contemplated the founding of institution- that would furnish 
not only "practical? 1 but also "liberal education" -education "in the 
several pursuit?." and just as certainly "in the several professions" of life. 
It forbids the exclusion of "classical studies." and requires attention to 
Agricultural and Mechanical Education, Military Tactics, etc. The act 
of the Legislature contemplated a school of general instruction, and 
directed the Board to organize several distinct departments, as above 
enumerated, in the interest of the people of the State and of the Nation. 
We trust that in the extent and in the quality of its work, and the 
thoroughness of its discipline and culture, as well as adaptation to the 
demands of the age, the University will prove itself deserving of no 
second rate position among the institutions of our land. It designs, by 
its instruction in Literature and Art ; in Language, ancient and modern ; 
in Mathematics, pure and applied; in the Sciences, agricultural, physi- 
cal, mental, moral and social : by its recitations, lectures, examinations 
and elevating influences, to educate, inform and discipline the student's 
mind; to strengthen his moral principles, and supply such general and 
generous, as well as special, culture as will best prepare him for success 
and usefulness in any pursuit or profession in life. 

OPPORTUNITIES AFFORDED. 

The work which the University is accomplishing can be readily un 

& " "jS 



&■ 



WEST VIRGINIA l\N 



II 






derstood from the Coui 
menta as already Bet forth. 

We call special attention, I 
Departments, viz: 

LAW I 

The Board of Regents at their 
Btep toward tin- creation of Departn* 
University. A 'Chair <»i Lav* an 
B. Lucas, of Jefferson county, wi - 
having signified his declination, the I 
proper recommendation, elected 
fereon county, to till the vacancy. Mr. Bro 
rent year have demonstrated his eapacit) 
Bhip he fills, and the authorities of the I 
dent hope that theSchool of Law will 
featu 
The Board of Regents electe 1 Hugh W. B M 

Ajiatoniy, Physiology and Hygiene. Dr. ! 

of his duties great natural aptitude, long 

study in the medical profession. His lee! 

of L879, were highly instructive and d< 

partments supply a long felt need in the University, and 

crease tin- numbe. of students, as well ae 

school. 

THl] AGRICULTl'll 

Young men who desire to study only such bran. 
Farmer to pursue his calling with intelligence and pro! 
at small expense of time and means, all they need in th< 
practical education. They are not required to study 
their own, nor go in mathematics farther than lai 
deficient in elementary studi< 
tory studies before entering this department. 



THE MIIiITAin 






& 



The law provides that five Cadets may be appoint 
District in the State. Thea .catedfre, 

stationery, &c. For such, military, 

thisdepar ml is provid I 

b„t may pnrsne their studies in an, 

ject to the general regnlati laid down in 

Other students are permitted to drill, on eo 

themselves with the neal and 1- inf 

oceupies hour on each of four d 

Gover -ui liberally furnish 

partment. These are of thelatesl and 












■*-' WF.ST VTTCfUVTA T'VTVPRCTTV 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Applicants for admission to the Corps should address the Regent of 
the Senatorial District in which they reside, stating age, attainments, 
giving reference as to character, etc. Applicants must be between sixteen 
and twenty-one years of age. The members of the Cadet Corps are 
generally esteemed among the best scholars in the University. 

THE PREPARATORY. 

But comparatively lew of our young men in West Virginia have home 
advantages for properly and fully preparing themselves to enter upon 
regular College studies. This Department has proved a fruitful source 
of supply for the higher classes, and also the means of maintaining an 
elevated grade of preliminary scholarship for admission to them. As the 
High Schools, Academies and Graded Schools of the State increase iu 
number and efficiency, in the same proportion will the necessity of this 
Department diminish. Meanwhile, and until their increase and fuller 
development, it cannot be dispensed with without lowering the standard 
of Collegiate Study proper, or .-hutting out from the advantages of the 
Institution many of the best and most promising young men of the 
State. Nowhere else can young men be better prepared for advanced 
studies, or, if this is not contemplated, accomplish more thoroughly and 
advantageously such studies as are here provided. 

Those who do not contemplate a full course, can also here be furnished 
with instruction in such preparatory studies as they may desire to pur- 
sue. 

An Optional Coubse is allowed those students whose special tastes or 
necessities prevent them from graduating in any of the regular Depart- 
ments. Parents and guardians of students who expect to attend the 
University are, however, earnestly advised to direct their studies with a 
view to entering one of the regular Departments. The attention of those 
who teach in our intermediate schools is also respectfully invited to this 
suggestion. 

During the Spring Term of each year i beginning on the second Wed- 
nesday of March), unusual facilities are provided for all who may desire, 
either to take a short and limited course, or to tit themselves for the 
higher grades of teaching, clerking, or other specialities. All needed as- 
sistance in this work being rendered by the several Professors of the Uni- 
versity, superior advantages are thus afforded to all comers. 

NORMAL INSTRUCTION. 

When desired, classes are formed in the Theory and Practice of Teach- 
ing, under the charge of an able and experienced instructor. Lee- 
are from time to time delivered before the class by the several members 
of the Faculty. The daily contact of the students in the class-room 
with their teachers, observing their methods and studying their plans, 
affords tine opportunities in this department of instruction. Nowhere 
in the State are afforded better facilities for practical Normal drill. The 

S^ & 



WEST VIRGINIA i M . 



graduates of the University have b 

desirable positions as teachers, and have in aim. 

satisfied their emplo; lining the 

them. The Faculty of the Cnivei - 

to capable students and gradua 

REQUISITES FOR ADMi 

I. All candidates for admission to an 
must present satisfactory evidence of good ra 

II. Students coming from other Colleges musl 
honorable dismission from the same, 
the Senior Class after the beginning 

III. Those entering as Students for a D . ■• •■ 
the University, must sustain an examination in 
the Preparatory School of the University, o 

IV. Can.; : Lai - for advanced standin 
the previous studies of the department which thi 

V. The regular examination for admission of candidates, who 1 
not pursued the preliminary studies in the Prepar 

vereity, will take place on Friday, succeeding Comi ■ on 

the firsl day of the Firsl Term. 

VI. Candidates should procure a copy of the printed la 
versity, also theTreasuri pt for tuition b 
selves for enrollment. 

VII. Applicants for admission to the Prepan 
stand an approved examination on spelling, readii 

graphy, elements of English grammar, and arithmetic thro 

mon fractions. 

VIII. Students arc required to pronounce Greek and Latin . 

to the so-called Continental method. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

I Each student, at the close of the Term, sled! 
examination upon all the studies which he ha 
No student shall be excused for non-attendai 

cept upon presentation of a reason which ma 
Faculty No student who may be absent, and ..... th. 
allowcdm continue in connection with the 1 
any Term a student shall have failed to attain a standi, 
often owing to a failure in examination, he shall 
andh allowed to stand a special examination m 

. be f or e the beginning of th. 

II • unationof each class shall be c luci 

composed of three members of the Faculty, who 

nex t preceding the examination, select a **\ 

8> ^ 






5T "<£ 

44 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



nine nor more than fifteen, in number, and submit the same in writing to 
the elass at the time of examination. 

[II. After examination the committee shall examine the papers and de- 
termine the standing made by each student in examination, which shall be 
considered the equivalent of one month's standing- in recitation. 

IV. Before a student shall be entitled to enter a higher class he shall, on 
a scale of ten, have attained a minimum standing of six in each study be- 
longing to his elass, which shall be determined by the average of his recita- 
tions and examinations. 

V. Students who have not before been at the University should, on their 
arrival, report themselves to the President, and by him he assigned to such 
department and studies as they may desire and be prepared to enter. When 
a regular course of study is once adopted, the student is not allowed to vary 
from it, or change to another, without permission. 

TUITION". 

Tuition in the Preparatory Department. - 
" in other departments - - - - 
Contingent Fee in Preparatory Dep't - - - 
" " in other departments 



$5 00 


per term 


8 00 


a 


2 00 


a 


2 00 


u 



BOARDING- AND EXPENSES. 

The Fxiveksitv has no Dormitories. This is a matter both of n 
sity and policy ; of necessity, because the State has not been able to 
furnish money to build dormitories; of policy, because it is thought 
better for the students to be distributed among the people of the University 
town, amenable to the common laws and sentiments of society. The public 
bounty stops at furnishing free instruction, leaving to private bands the 
providing of maintenance. 

Three methods of boarding are practiced: (1) Self boarding, by indivi- 
duals, or, more commonly, by small groups or colonies composed of mem- 
bers of the same family, or of neighboring families. Rooms are hired, and 
furniture, provisions and fuel are brought from home. When well man- 
aged, this is an excellent and very economical mode of living. From $1.00 
to SI. 50 a week per pupil may be set down as the cost. (2) Club boarding. 
This has been practiced for some time and is an excellent system. A com- 
pany of young men rent a number of rooms or an entire house and then 
organize and operate a boarding club. The price of boarding in clubs va- 
ries from $1.50 to $2.25 per week, including rent of room. (3) Boarding 
in families. The difficulties formerly encountered in procuring suitable 
places for students desiring to board in families, have disappeared. Good 
boarding can be found at reasonable prices ranging from $2.50 to $3.50. 

Incidental expenses depend on the habits of the student. The law pro- 
hibits students incurring debts at stores, groceries. &c., except on written 
order of parents, guardian or teacher. Unnecessary and lavish expendi- 
tures induce not only waste of time and means, but neglect of study and 
formation of bad habits. 

& & 



3T '7 

\\ EST VIRGINIA ITNIV1 



The expenses 

Kere than in any other pla< • kno 
Btructions and other equal ad> 

hj ecotunnical habits 
ing board, room-rent, tuition, ■ 
I' air, rsity. 

Tii r. I>'r..i \ i-' I'ki/.i s. To i he i udenl « lio - 
a given subject, $25. To the studenl • 
claimer, $15. These pri 
committee of citia ins appoint 

These were awarded :it th<' lasl con.4 

Essaj fan 

1 • clamation A. •). Elliott 

The 1'ki siden r's Prizes. I 
Parthenon Literary S 
owing prizes : To the suc< essful I 
$25 ; t<> the successful Essaj ist, $25 ; to 
prizes to be awarded by a committee chc 
Societies may prescribe. 

DISCIPLIK 

The rules of the University require thai even rtudenl Khali be 
place al all stated exercises from the openi 
tion with the University. V record i* kepi in »\ 
of scholarship of each student, his absence from I 
tion, his tardin *s, or failure in recitation, unl< - 
for.' An abstracl of this r cord, i- - al at tl 

guardians, so that they mi I and ho 

studying, and how they .tand in scholarship and dej 

ther misconduct, the student will b 
monished and the parenl or guardian will be in! 
inattention to study will, if persisted in, insure dismi* 
sity. Nostudent is allowed I 
term time without special permission. 

The attention of parents and gu 
that all exercises begin promptly on the da 
that it is essential 
thai he be punctual in his place from 1 

No excuse will be accepted for afaf 

[tmusi be distinctly underst I I 

condition that they h with the rules of th 

themselves punctually and without inl 

College duties mmed reqt 

work taken up by himself or im, -I bj ol 

mere pleasure of the rtudent or hi* 

those duties. 

&_ 



3T ~*£ 

46 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



The government of the students proceeds upon an entirely Christian 
basis. Kindness, gentleness and trustfulness are relied upon, rather than 
sternness, impatience and suspicion. In such an atmosphere, all noble and 
manly qualities ripen, and students learn to demean themselves as Christian 
gentlemen. Students are encouraged and incited to form habits of economy, 
industry, self-reliance, truthfulness and purity, and thus to become a law 
unto themselves. 

RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTIONS AND WORSHIP. 

The exercises of each day are opened with reading the Scriptures, sing- 
ing and prayer, at which all the students are required to be present. They 
are also required, unless for sufficient reason excused, to attend regularly 
some place of religious worship on the Sabbath, and on all occasions to 
treat the institutions of religion with respect. The President of the Uni- 
versity frequently preaches on Sunday afternoon in the chapel hall. The 
institution is entirely free from sectarian control or domination. 

In the internal management and practical working of the institution, 
there is not now", and never has been, the slightest denominational friction. 

LIBRARY. 

A respectable beginning towards a University Library has been made. 
About five thousand volumes have been carefully selected and. placed 
on its shelves, including, not only many choice and valuable books of 
reference, but also standard works in the various departments of His- 
tory, Biography, Theology. Agriculture, Arts, Science and General Lit- 
erature. During the past year, about one hundred and fifty volumes 
have been added by purchase to the Library, including a number of very 
valuable works on Literature and Science. 

We respectfully request the friends of education to make contribu- 
tions to its shelves. In addition t<> those hitherto granted, the follow- 
ing donations have been received « luring the year : 

I — .— 

Vols. Title. Doxor;. 

1 Peuna. Geological Survey Prof. I. C. White. 

1 Message and Documents— War Department Hon. B. F. Martin. 

1 0. S Survey " 

1 Coast Survey Secretary of the Interior. 

1 Coast Survey, '74-'75 " " 

24 Executive Documents " " 

1 Senate Journal " " " 

14 Miscellaneous Documents 

11 Committee Reports " " 

1 Geology of N. H.. Vol.3 Secretary of Slate. X. H. 

l Set of Maps " " 

leologieal Survey (Territorial) Hon. B. F. Martin. 

Statistical Atlas.. • 

1 Commerce and Navigation " " " 

1 Congressional Directory Hon. H G. Davis. 

1 Illinois Agric. Reports Unknown. 

ID 3 al Survey. Birds of the Colorado Valley Secretary of the Interior. 

1 V. S. Geological Survey. Report of U. S. Ed topological 

Commission ". " " " 

2 U. S. GeoL Survey, Miscellaneous Publications. Nos. 9 
and 10 " " " 



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Map ■ 

Nearly all the Weekly journals i 
the Daily S 
religious papers of all the leading 
ously sent to the reading room of tl 

MUSEUM, AFP A HAT US. 

The University is in 
illustration of Chemistry and Phye 

eral valuable articles of apparatus hav< 
partment of Astronomyand I 
by Green 
with Zin< isation, by E. Ho* 

has been constructed by John I 
equatorially mounted with right i 
a first-class instrument in «•■ 

The department of li ' furnished w 

the Unit , anda fine setot Bi 

cal Wall Maps, ten in number, from I 

Jutus Pe 

hllVl . vi.U-.i for use in different departm. 

The Museum contains extensive Minn-;, 
chol( ether with many specim. 

Natural Bistory. U all who 

to send suite 

.hells inuua. 

tionswillbeacknowl dged and carefully li 

donor. Then are alr< 

andmor 

The vicinil 
study of practical I Mention will >• 

branch. 

The labratory of Practical Chemistry isino] 
for the present is devoted chiefly to analysis, v. 

riculture. ^ 



5$ *g 

48 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



UNITED STATES SIGNAL STATION. 
By direction of General Meyer, Chief Signal Officer of the Army, a sig- 
nal station has been established at the University forthebenefit of Com- 
merce, Agriculture and Science. It is, at present, in charge of Sergeant 

John J. McLean, S. ( ., U. S. Army. Students are by this means furnished 
with special advantages for the study of Meteorology and related sub- 
jects. The frequent and carefully recorded observations taken bj means 
of the most improved instruments will furnish accurate and reliable 
data for hereafter estimating climatic changes in West Virginia. By 
this means also, the newspapers, boards of trade, and river men gener- 
ally, at Pittsburgh, Wheeling and Cincinnati, if they so desire, can be 
reliably advised of special movements in the river at the head of navi- 
gation. An abstract of the observation at this station for the year 1877, 
is printed at the end of the Catalogue. Sergeant McLean also teaches 
Telegraphy and Signaling, gratuitously. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are two of these, (the Parthenon and the Columbian,) in con- 
nection with the University, supplied with suitable halls, tastefully fur 
nished, whose exercises in Composition, Reading, Orations, Debate and 
Criticism are, in many respects, of great advantage to the student. They 
also afford facilities for the study of, and acquaintance with, Parliamen- 
tary forms, and the acquisition of business habits. The authorities of 
the University will afford every facility for increasing the accommoda- 
tion and usefulness of these valuable auxiliaries. 

LOCATION. 

Morgantown, the seat of tha University, is beautifully located on the 
right bank of the Monongahela river, Monongalia county, West Vir- 
ginia. The scenery around is exceedingly attractive and picturesque. 
The place has long been famous for its social, intellectual and moral cul- 
ture, and general healthfulness. Coaches leave every morning to and 
from Fairmont, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. There is also a 
daily conveyance between Morgantown and Uniontown, Pa. Steam- 
boats from Pittsburgh arrive every day at Geneva, twelve miles below 
Morgantown, and Congress has made liberal appropriations for the con- 
tinuance of slackwater navigation in the Monongahela as far as Morgan- 
town. A place more eligible for the quiet and successful pursuit of 
Science and Literature is nowhere to be found. 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS. 

The buildings are eligibly situated, and are admirably adapted to the 
purposes of the University. They are immediately outside, and within 
a few minutes' walk of Morgantown. The campus is ample, and is a fine 
natural park. The grounds command a wide and noble prospect; the 
town, the river, the bridge, the mountains, all feast the eye and soul. 
The buildings are models of architectural beauty and convenience, and 
are healthfully constructed. In addition to Preparatory Hall, the Armory 

& <Si 



s> 



\ IRQ IN I A 



lias been furnished, and is now tccnpied l 
Building has also been finished and furnil 
exercises of 1877-8 were held in its spacious 
year, all the appointments of the Univ< 
tractive. It is surely winning it- way to the I 
Berved support of the pe »ple of Wesl Virgin 



®1 



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January 

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March.... 

Apiil 

.May 

June 

July 

August 

September... 
< (ctober 

December... 


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w EST VIRGINIA UNIV1 



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WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, 



MORGANTOWN, 



For ihe ITear 1 82 9 80, 




WHEELING 

\\ . .1 JOH* 

L880 



& 



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men (lav 



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According to an order ol the R rih , 87fi 

1 n »weityyear includes fort j one wee ks, and 
fore, into three terms. 

The FihstTebm begins on the firsi Wednesday ol 
and continues thirteen weeks. 

The Second Term begins on the fourth Wednesday ol 
voini.fi-. and the Third, on the Becond \\V li,osday ol March. 

The- Anm al Coximen* burnt is on the second Thursday ol 

June. 

Prompt attendance al the beginning ol oach term ia very im- 
portant to the student. 

1880. 
June 3d. -Thursday, 9 v. m.— Annual Eiaminfttion begins. 

6th.- Sunday, 8 p. m. Baccalaureafc Sermon, by the President 
7th. Monday, 7:30 p. >i. Regents 

Bth. Tuesday, 7:30 p. u. Anniversary of the alumni Association. 
9th. Wednesday, 7:30 p. m. Address to th( I I 
10th. Thursday, 9 \. m Commxncxmxi m Public 

( \>nt. m of the Literary Bociel 
September 1st. -Wednesday, 9 \ k. Examination of Candid 
admission. 
2d. Thursday, 9 \. m. Regular work of 1880 l 1»-K'm-. 
mber 23d. Tu< sd ij I si l erm ends 

24th. Wednesday, [.—Second Term begins. 

1881. 
March 8th. Tuesday Second T< i m ends 

9th. Wednesday Third Term begins. 
April -jiM. Friday Junior Exhibition. 
June 9th, Thursday Third Term ends 

COMMZlTCELdlElTT. 



i£> _ 



&' 



*& 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



icwH of ilcgents. 



No. Dist. 

1 - 



S 

!> 

10 

n 

12 



Name of Regent. 
B. W. Allen, - 
James Morrow, Jr. 
M. S. Hall, - 
D. D. Johnson, 
James Stewart, 
H. S. Walker, 
H. C. SIMMS. 
A. F. Mathews. 
T. J. Farnsworth. 
H. W. Brock, - 
John A. Robinson, 
D. B. Lucas, - 



P. O. Address. 

Wheeling. 

Fairmont. 

Harrisville. 

Long Reach. 

Raymond City. 

Charleston. 

Huntington. 

Lewisburg. 

Buckhannon. 

Morgantown. 

Pattei-son's Creek. 

Charlestown. 



Officers of the Board. 

O. D. JOHNSON. President. 
A. W. LORENTZ. Treasurer. 
Hl'GH W. BROCK, Secretary. 

Executive Committee. 

HUGH W. BROCK. Chairman. 
JOHN J. BROWN. 
PHILIP H. KECK. 
JOS. MORELANP. 
THOS. H. PRICE. 
THOS. ROGERS. 
F. SHISLER. 
J. P. SHAFER. 

Secretary. 
JOHN I HARVEY. 



gir%>Em&TE*r®E.vT of Geqiwds #.y® 'BiriLZn.yGs. 

W. O. ISON. 



A 



8 



5T 



> 



r/aiVh] mul % 



•0'>0« 

REV. .1. R. THOMPSON, \ M I'm 

Prof, of M< /it" I "nil Mm ■ US 

F. s. I. Vox. A M . Vice-Presideni 
Prof, of History, Political Econon 

Prof, of Agric.ultun . ( % 

ROBT. C. BERKELEY . M A 
.,' Languages and Literatui 

JOHN I. HARVEY, A M 
Prof, of Modern Languages and Literature, n 

I. C. WHITE, A M . 
Prof, of Astronomy and Sain, 

A W. LORENTZ, \ M 
Principal of tlu Preparatory l> 

D. B. PUR1NTON, \ M 

Prof, of Logic and Acting Prof, oj '' 

II. W BROCK, M D 
Prof, of Anat( 



| iThe studies oi thii Chair hare I n tempoi ^ 



5T ® 



WEST VIRGINIA UMVERSITV 



2P£k1& r ^'Em w E i !£?— Continued. 

ST. GEORGE T. BROOKE, 

Prof, of Law and Equity. 

JAMES S. STEWART, B. S., 

Assistant in Preparatory Department. 

MAJOR W. O. ISON, A. M , 

Commandant of Cadets and Assistant in Preparatory Department. 

JOHN B. MERRILL, S. C. U.S. A.,* 

Meteorological Observer and Instructor in Signaling and Telegraphy. 



WM. DANCER, Janitor. 







3 




;e 



-John J. McLean, S. C. U. S. A,, occupied this position during the Fall and Winter 
Terms. 

& . ft 



$ '? 



w EST VI KG 




^/_ ^E'XIUl'-fi 



in:\ C II PAYNE, D.D., LL.D., 
"Shams. 1 

i:i:\ \. WHEELER, D. I>. 
"The Failure o J the Christian Church. 1 

REl . ROBEET LOWEY, D. D / 

"Cardinal Wolse 
•M nsic." 

IIoN K. (.. CEACEAFT, 
"Master or Slave Which?' 

REV. W 0. 8N< IDGEASS 
"A Love That ( iomes Too Late. 

HON. JNO. A. HUTCHINSON, 

"Political Morality. 

HON. D. D. JOHNSOB 
"The Christian Citizen. 



3* 



ST 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, 



8 



»o^o« 

1870. 
Dent, Mabmaduee H., A. M. 



Dllle, Oliver H.. M. S. 



1871. 

JOLLIFFE. WM. E., A. M. 



Dbabell, John H., A. M. 
McLane. Allen E.. A. M. 



1872. 



Smith, Benj. W., A. M. 
White, I. C, A. M. 



1873. 



Babb, Chas. M., A. M. 
Bobdeb, Daniel W., A. M. 
Boughnee, Wm. L., M. S. 
Beown, James F., A. M. 
Bullock, Edmund T., A. M. 
Habeis. John T., M. S. 
Linch, George P.. M. S. 



McCluke, Taylor B., M. S. 
Price. Thomas H.. M. S. M. D. 
Pritchard, Wm. T.. M. S. 
Purinton, Danlel B. , A. M. 
Temple, Mabcellus L.. A. M. 
Waters. James T.. A. M. 



*Chadwick, Richard V., A 
Dean, John S.W., A. M. 
Howell. Wm. M., A. M. 
Jacobs, Thos. P., A. M. 



1874 

M. Lynch. Chas. W.. A. M. 

Moban, Ellsworth E., A. 
Woods. Frank. A. M. 



M. 



Adams. Samuel Shugert, A. M. 
Dolliyer, R. H., A. M. 
Dolltver, J. P.. A. M. 
Golden, Franklin A., B. S. 



1875. 



Martin, James V., A. M. 
Peterson. J. J.. A. M. 
Purinton. A. L., A. M. 



1876. 



Anderson. John C. M. S. 
Fbasheb, Luze H. , A. M. 
Hubbaed, Haeby Dana, M. S. 
Ison, Wllley Owens, A. M. 
Kemp, Howaed Mason, B. S. 
"Deceased. 



& 



Laidley, George Summees, M. S. 
Nash, James Henby, M. S. 
Ramage, Thomas C, M. S. 
Wetzel, Daniel Elliot, A. M. 



.8 



& 






.. Willi \m Gay, A. B. 
i L.B. 

Hawthobne, Joskpb H.. a. H 
Hood, Thomas .M.. A. B. 
Rogers 






\ B 

9 



O 



I '.. B. 8. 
Day i' N Gordon, A. B, 

Lee. James M< Milu n. a. B, 



PtJRlN i I kNA, A. !i. 

Rogers, Williaii A A 1; 



M' \. l;. 

Mm.- 




& 



& 



S>~ ' "^ 



10 WEST VIRGINIA UNtVERSlTY. 






SENIORS. 

Grafton, Charles Edwin Sei New Cumberland, Hancock Co. 

Keenan, B. L Sci Maidsville, Monongalia, Co. 

Marsh, John Nelson Class... Morgan town . 

Pearre, Geo. A., Jr Class. ..Cumberland, Md. 

Waters. A. A Class. ..Laurel Point, Monongalia Co. 

JUNIORS. 

*Cox, A. L Sci Fairmont. 

Hodges, Thos. E Class. ..French Creek, Upshur County. 

Hyland, William M Class... 

Oxon Hill, Prince George's Co., Md. 
*Ogdex, Howard N Class. ..Fairmont. 

SOPHOMORES. 

* Anderson, William Franklin.... Class. ..Eastou, Monongalia County. 

*Boyd, T. R Class.. .Galva, 111. 

♦Brown, Zalmon Kent Class... Morgantown. 

Courtney, David Hall Class. ..Randall, Monongalia County. 

♦Cox, Fra nk Class. . .Morgantown . 

Freeman. H. S Class. ..Clarksburg. 

♦Haymond, George Hiram CI ass... Morgantown. 

♦Jeffries, Elias Dick Class. ..Arbuckle, Mason County. 

Lawhead, James Henry Sci Morgantown. 

Lewis. George C Class... Clarksburg. 

♦Lowther, Sylvester Class... Morgantown. 

*Smtth, Ashby Jackson, Class... Parkersburg. 

Sommers, Camden Sci Clarksburg. 

FRESHMEN. 

Baker, George Coleman Class... Morgantown. 

♦Basnett, Hilllard Samuel Class. ..Basnettsville, Marion County. 

Berkeley, Lancelot M Class... Morgantown. 

Class— Classical Course. Sci.— Scientific Course. -Conditioned. 

& £ 



& 



VIRGINIA ' 



FRESHMEN 
Bland. William Thomas Sci W< 

*BoYERS, LUTHKB M I 

♦Brown, Benjamin ( Hast ton. 

BROWN, SAMUBL BOARDMAN I 

•Camden, Richabd Pindle c ua Weston. 

•Devote, Josepb M< Hurry .Sci. , .Wheeling, 

Donna ll\ , Chari i> ELedrk k Sci Charleston. 

Glenn, Charles Fletcher Class... Morgan to wo. 

•G AM BRILL, GEORGE KlN< HELOB ' 

Hood, Smith Class... Lows vi lie, Monongalii I 

*James80n, Horatio Pekbbrton ...s-i Piedmont. 

Johnston, John L 6 County. 

*Kelley, George Mac ki en B M rgantown. 

*Kelley, Samuel Chestnut Sri Morgantown. 

Lazzei.l. Luther Jambs ( as liaidsrille, M ( 

Lazzeli . 1> a \< Grant Class... Maidsville, Monong I 

Lorentz, Charles Fredrich Sci Morgantown. 

MoCarty, Norval Bushrod Class. ..Lumberport, Harrison C ity. 

MusgbavEj John Edgab Sci Weal Columbia, Mason Conntj. 

Morris, H. Perry Class.. .Morgantown. 

Nefflen, Paul Herman Sci Piedmont, Mineral Conntj 

•Patton, John Class... Romine't Mills, Harru 

^Russell, John Donley Sci St. Cloud, Monongalia Connty, 

•Stewart, James Henry.: Class... Elsinore, Putnam < lonnty. 

Well-, 8. P., Jb Sci Parkeraburg. 

•Wever, Charles Allen Class.. .Martinsburg. 

♦Williams, Benjamin G., Sci Greenaburgb, Pa 

OPTIONAL STUDENTS. 

Cowan M. E Wilsonburg, Harrison County 

Henry, C. 0. O'D Newburg, Preston Connty. 

Hough, Walter Morgantown. 

Pearre, James i \b \ham Cumberland, Md 



Class— Classical Course Sci.— Scientific Got litU>Q«d. 




& & 



ST 

12 



1& 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



professional jitttclettts 



*h* 



Haymond, Frank T Morgantown. 

Houston, Waitman Willey Morgantown. 

Hodges, Thomas E French Creek, Upshur County 

Hyland, William M 

Oxon Hill, Prince George's County, Md. 

Pearre, George A., Jr Cumberland, Md. 



m mm 



Arnett, C. W Fairmont, Marion County. 

Courtney, A.. F Randall, Monongalia County. 

Fi tch, Porsey P Morgantown , Monongalia Co. 

Gntewood. D. C Gladesville, Preston County. 

Glenn, C. F Morgantown, Monongalia Co. 

Henry, C. 0. O'D Newburg, Preston County. 

Kelly, W. C Morgantown, Monongalia Co. 

Tanzey, A. F Uffington, Monongalia County. 



& 



i£ 



~~ £ 






& 



^*XCD\0 'jl'XJT* 



[;kv, .1 i: THOMPSON \ M 

A. W LOBENTZ, \ M 
Principal. 

JAMBS - STEWART, B S., Sn u part, 

■////. 

MAJOB W 0. ES( i 
andanl of Cadi 

D B PUBINTON, \ M 
n Vocal U 



!$ 



& *£ 



14 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



■>- 



SENIOR YEAR. 

Armstrong. Robert 

Armstrong's Landing, Putnam County. 

Arnett, Calvin W Fairmont, Marion County. 

Barb, Waitman T. Willey Laurel Point, Monongalia Co. 

Brooke, Lee Davis Helena. Montana Territory. 

Cargill, Samuel G Winfield, Putnam County. 

Chapman. William Gray, Jr.*.- Warsaw. Indiana. 

Cooper, Charles Nelson Bellville, Wood County. 

Cork, Jacob F Clarksburg, Harrison County. 

Davis, William Craft Oakland, Md. 

Fisher, Sandford Rosewell Laurel Point. Monongalia Co. 

Fleming, Harvey Auburn. Ritchie County. 

Gatewood, DeWitt Clinton Gladesville, Preston County. 

Gregg. Charles Taylor Morgantown. 

Hall, Ira E Laurel Point, Monongalia Co. 

Hare, Alfred Jarrett Morgantown. 

Hawthorne, James Edmund Randall, Monongalia County. 

Hartigan, James William Piedmont, Mineral County. 

Holt, A. L Glenville, Gilmer County. 

Huston. Chauncey Waitman Morgantown. 

Jackson, John Cabell Benjamin Kingwood. Preston County. 

Jamison. Jesse Alfred Laurel Point. Monongalia Co. 

Keener, Waitman Wiiley Morgantown. 

Kerr, Robert Emmett Swamp Run. Upshur County. 

Knight, Lycurgus Newton West Columbia, Mason County. 

Mapel. Walter P Rosed ale, Greene County. Pa. 

McMillen, Edward Willie Mason town, Preston County. 

Michael. Walter Howard Bruceton Mills, Preston I 

O'Brien, Daniel Ulysses Weston, Lewis County. 

O'Brien, William Smith Weston Lewis County. 

Ong, Joseph XihofY Charleston, Kanawha County. 

Patton, Daniel Boughner Harrisville, Ritchie County. 

Poling. Francis Asbury Philippi. Barbour County. 

Purnell, Frank Morgan Bellaire, Ohio. 

Ralphsnyder, Lafayette Cedar Valley. Monongalia Co. 

Ramsey, William Hance Huntington, Cabell County. 

Reed. David K Grafton, Taylor County. 

Robinson, Harry Lee L'niontown. Fayette Co., Pa. 

Smith. Jasper Washington Maidsville, Monongalia Countv 

$ .& 



%> 



ll:«.l\i \ ■ 



SENIOR YEAR 

Snodgrass, Calvin Newton Unburn, 

Sweeney, John David 

Tapp, Robert W \l 

Townshend, Arthur 

Vance, Lee Horner Clai 

Waters, Otis Watson Randall, M 

Williams, Luther Judson Willi 

Wilson, John Franklin 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Bailey, Robert McCanlish W< 

Boughmr. Andrew Brown Moi 

Boyer, Bimon Leonard Randall, Moi 

Brand, William Hart feaston, U 

Oasteel, Delphy Truman Ellsworth ftlcHenry, I 

Conley. Henry ('anvil Piedmont, M 

Dawkins. Arthur Dempsey Sandyville, J 

Dupuy, Alexander Victor I 

Edwards. John Henry East Libert; 

Everett, Dick F Cumberland. Md. 

Fear, Janus Arthur Hoodsville, M tt^J 

Hagans. William Henry Brandonvil] .ty. 

Henry, James C Newbui ' t\. 

Hurst, Nathaniel G Qniontown 

Irwin. Robert Sheridan Ilorgantown, 

Jamesson, Harper Piedmont, Mineral County. 

Johns, Philip Sheridan [foiontown, 

KiNmiller, Lewis Knottaville, I aty. 

Lazier, Harrison Williams liorgantown. 

St. Clair, Leroy Kramer Easton, Monongana County. 

Upson, Frank Ellsworth Warsaw, Indiana. 

W T hite, Thomas Lincoln Rock Lick, Marshall County. 

Windon, John Henry Graham 8tation, :il . v - 

Yokum, Humbolt Beverly, Randolph County. 



& Cj 



3T "Sg 



16 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Seniors 5 

Juniors 4 

Sophomores 13 

Freshmen 30 

Optional Students 4 

Law Students 5 

Medical Students 8 

Senior Preparatory Students 46 

Junior Preparatory Students 24 

Grand Total 139 

Deduct for those counted more than once 7 

Total 132 

— < ••°-°- >~ 

RICAPOTMTOT BY COUNTIES IN WEST VIRGINM. 

Barbour County ! 1 

Berkeley County , 1 

Cabell County 1 

Gilmer County 1 

Greenbrier County 1 

Hancock County 1 

Harrison County 8 

Jackson County" '. 1 

Kanawha County 3 

Lewis County 5 

Marshall County 1 

Marion County 5 

Mason County 4 

Mineral County 5 

Monongalia County 49 

Ohio County 1 

Preston County 8 

Putnam County 3 

Randolph County 1 

Ritchie County 3 

Taylor County 3 

Tyler County , 1 

Upshur County 2 

Wood County 4 

Total 113 

£>___ £ 



& 8 



u l>i \ li:« ' 



RECAPITU::.:i3N BY STATU. 



West Virginia 

Pennsylvania 

Maryland 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Ohio I 

Louisiana • 

Montana Territory ' 

rotal 



The following is an exhibit of the number of students enrolled i 
from the beginning : 

The year 1867 v . shows a total of 124. 
The year L868 9, shows a total of 154. 
The year 1869 7". shows a total of 161. 
The year 1870 l. shows a tot; J of 166. 
The yt-ar 1871 2, shows a total of 159. 
The year L872 3, shows a total of 1 14. 
The year L873 t. shows a total of L38. 
The year 187-1 5, shows a total of 125. 
The year L875 6, shows a total of 96. 
The year 1876 7. shows a total of 93. 
The year L877 B, shows a total of 1 18. 
The year 1878 9, shows a total of 136. 
The present year, L879 BO, shows a total of I 




& 



*5 



18 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



J£iliisLvy Dsparzinsv* 



^ £=: •->■ 



Y4fc-$'W-&W« 



REV. J. R. THOMPSON, A. M. 

President. 



W. O. ISON, Maj., A. M. 

Commandant. 

— ^ .lO-Oi' ^» 

C02^3^EISSI02SrE3D OFFICERS. 

CAPTAIN : 

Cadet BRUCE L. KEENAN. 

LIEUTENANTS : 

Cadet CHAS. E. GRAFTON, [ First Lieutenant. 

Cadet ARTHUR L. COX, First Lieutenant and. Adjutant. 

Cadet THOS. E. HODGES, Second Lieutenant and Ordnance Officer. 

Cadet GEORGE A. PEARRE, Second Lieutenant. 

& £ 



5$ 






^sD^n/iiii-ii v s j? £>u?*Jlu;; 



_ — 



itcu coiviMissiciT-z c~r-;~ zzrvr. 



Cadet W. M. Hyi \ nd, Firel & 

( ' \i»i:r J. N. M \i>m. Sergeant. 
(' mm:t J. H. S Serf int. 

Cadi i E. D. Jei 

< \ m r i .. C. 1 : ''!"• 

Cadet F. M. Pi rnei i Corporal. 

( ' mm r D. II. COI RTNF/1 . I 

c mm.i \. J. >mii a. < orporal. 
c mm i < r. C. Baker, Corporal. 
c \Di.i 8. G. C vrgill, Corporal. 
Cm. ki II. S Corporal. 



No. of 

District. 



N \ M E. 



I! KM \KK> 



Wli- ! 



Charles 1' Grafton Present for duty... 

Joseph M. Devine Honorably disci 



Samuel B. Brown Present for duty 

Vacancy 
Vacancy. 
Vacancy 



- 









fe. 



•F 



Arthur L. Cox Present for duh 

HilliardS. Basnetl Absent with leav< 

Jacob L. Glasscock Honorabh 

Camden Sommers. Dropped from roll • ' 

Howard N. Ogden Pr< 

Wm. II II ' fordutj 

Vacancy 

died to return 



s 



3*" 

20 



WEST VIRGINIA INIYERSITY 



*& 



ROSTER OF STATE CADETS— Continued. 



No. of 
District. 



1II.-5 



IV 



r 

i 



VI. 



VII. 



VIII 



Name. 



Remarks. 



II. S. Freeman Discharged 

George C. Lewis Absent with leave 

Wm. H. Heaton Honorably discharged 

C. N. Snodgrass Present for duty 

A. L. Holt Present for dutv 



When Enlisted 
or Discharged. 



Oct. 24, 1ST'.'. 
Oct. 5, 1877. 
March 31, 1880. 
Sept. 12, 18 
Sept. 26, 1879. 



Jacob Cork Present for duty I Oct. 10,1879. 

Harvey Fleming Present for duty March 31, 1880 



Win. M. Hyland Present for duty Sept. 14, 18'i 

E. P. Chancellor, Jr Honorably discharged.. March 31, 1880. 

Ashby J. Smith Absent with leave 

George K. Gambrill Present for duty 

John D. Sweeney Present for duty 

VacaDCY 



Sept. 20, L878. 
Sept. 20, 1878 
March 31, 1880. 



F. K. Meeks Honorably discharged. 

Samuel G. Cargill Present for duty 



April 28, 1880, 
Oct. 2, 1878. 



Robert Armstrong Present lor duty April 11, 181 



L. N. Knight. 
U. N. Ong.... 

Vacancy 

Vacancy 



Present for duty Sept. 20, 1879. 

Dropped from roll March 12, L880. 



E. D. Jeffries Present for duty 

L. D. Sisler Honorably discharged 



Jas. H. Stewart 
John E. Musgrave. 
John L. Johnston.. 
Vacancy 



Sept. 14, 1877. 

Oct. 17, 1879. 

Present for duty Sept. 20, 1878. 

Present for duty \pril 11, 1879. 

Present for duty April 11, 1879. 



Bruce L. Keen an Present for duty 

Smith Hood Honorably discharged. 

+ C. T. Gregg Dropped from roll 

Chas. H. Donally Present for duty 

W. H Ramsey Present for duty 

Vacancy 

VacancY .... 



March 30, 1-77. 
Nov. 21, 1879. 
March 12, 1880. 
Sept 12, 1879. 
March 31, 1880. 



J. C. Williard Dropped from roll March 31, 1880. 

George C. Baker Present for dutv March 8, 1878. 

G. M. Chidester Dropped from roll March 31, 1880. 

D. C. Gatewood Present for duty March 28, 1879. 

Benj. Brown Present for duty Sept. 12, l v .'.'. 

Wm. T. Bland Present for duty Oct. 10. 1879. 

! tM. E. Cowan Dropped from roll March 12, 1880. 

Vacancy I 

Failed to return books received as Cadet. fFailed to attain the standard required of 



Cadets. 



& 



ft 



5* 



WBST VIRGINIA l SIN 



*5 



ROSTER OF S ! DETS 



No. of 
District 



IX. 



XI. 



XII. 



X wn:. 



REM \i;k-. 






V;"""V n 1 • gonorably discharged I. 

, • V K , Reed Dropped from roll March 

• I i okum Dischargi .1 

I } - U. O'Brien Preseut for duty '" 

\ acancy, 



an. I i 

& |.t. I 



Vacancy 
Vacancy. 



C. 0. O'D. Henry.... 
David II. Courtney .. 
Jas. II. Lawhead ...... 

E W. McMillen 

I. G. Laziell 

Robert W. Tapp 



Discharged 

! ' for 'Iui\ . 

P 

Present for duty - 

Present for duty lai 

Pre» in for duty \i 

Thos. C. Blackiston Honorably discharged.. March 31, 1880 

Paul II. Nefflen Present for duty.. 

John Pat ton Present for duty < u i 

Henry ('. Conley Present for duty Sept. PJ 

J. W. Hartigan Present for duty Sept. 12, 1-7'.'. 

Vacancv „ 



J. X- Marsh Present for duty March S 

G.L. Blackford Honorably discharged.. 11,1880. 

R. I'. Camden Discharged Jan. 14, 

L II. Vance Discharged Feb 13, 

Robert M.Bailey Present for duty M 11,1880. 

Vacancy 

Vacancy 

Vacancv , 



i to attain the standard required of Cadets 



VOLUNTEEH CAEET3. 



Name. Remarks. 


Wh< • 


a. Pearre, Jr 

•I. 1 >. Pearre 

F. M. PurneD 

L M. Berkeley 

D. F. Everett 




Oct ir», i- 


Present for dut\ 

Present for duty 

Present f<>r duty 

Present for dutv 


t '. N. < Sooper 


Present for duty 




S. P Wells Jr 


Present for duty 

i • ' for duty 




N. <i. Hurst 





&. 



s^ 



& 



WEST VIRGINIA UXIVKHSITV. 



'<£ 



DISTINGUISHED CADETS, 1878-9. 



Name. 



Military. 



('. E. Grafton Military. 

B. L. Keenan Military 

J. N. Marsh 

G. A. Pearre , Jr Military. 

E. P. Chancellor, Jr Military 

A. L. Cox Military , 

J. L. Glasscock Military. 

Military. 

Military . 

Military. 

Military . 

Military. 

Military. 

Military. 

Military. 

Military 



Military. 

Military. 
Military. 



Course. 



Scientific. 

Scientific. 

Classical. 

Classical. 

Classical. 

Scientific. 

Classical. 

Classical. 
Classical. 
Scientific. 

Classical. 



C. O. O'D. Henry 

T. E. Hodges 

W. M. Hyland 

W. H. Seanion 

T. C. Blackiston 

G. L. Blackford 

H. S. Freeman 

Oscar Jenkins 

G. C. Lewis 

H. N. Ogden 

J. G. Pearre 

A. -I. Smith 

Camden Sommers 

E. 1). Jeffries, 

G. G. Baker Military. 

U.S. Basnett ! Preparatory. 

G. K. Gambrill Military 

P. H. Netfien Military Preparatory. 

■). M. Devine Military 

Smith Hood I Preparatory. 

F. M. Purnell Military 

L. D. Sisler Military 

-I. H. Stewart Military Preparatory. 

S. G. Cargill Military. 

W. H. Heaton Military. 

F. K. Meeks Military. 



Classical. 

Classical. 
Scientific. 
Classical. 



*lu accordance with the custom established, the above Cadets are reported as distin- 
guished in the departments opposite their names, by re,asorj o£ having attained a yearly 
average of !) and upwards ona scale of 10. 




& 



iS 



5f 



: 0cka1 -Hlusic. 



D. B. PURLNTON, \. M Insi 

Some year- ago, the Regents added 
of the University. It is open, free ol chai 
all departments alike. The course ol instruction) 
year, as follows : 

Fall Term- -Rudiments and Elementary Pract 

Winteb Term -Rudiments continued. 
Singing. 

Spring Term- -Lectureson Harmony and Composition l 
Singing, Review, &c. 



Anderson, W. F. Jeffries, E. 1). 

Bland, W. T. Johnston, J. L 

Boyd. T. R. Keenan, B L 
Boyers, L. M. 

, e el, |». B K.-lly. «.. M 

Courtney, D. 11. Karsb, •' N , _ 

Devine,J. M. Jinsgrave, J. K 

Edwards, J. H. Pearre, J.G 

Gatewood, D. < Ramsey, \N II 

c | Snodgrass a IN 

Heni s ' ,u:,r ' ;' ' 
Hodges, T. E. . : " l , . : " , , 

Hough, W. Williams, L •' 

Hyland, W. M. 



^ 



S 



3£ ~*<g 



24 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, 



•o<0-o« 



The instruction thus far provided for in the University is embraced in six 
departments, viz : The Classical, Scientific, Agricultural, Engineering, Mili- 
tary : and for those desiring to qualify themselves for regular admission to 
any of these, a Preparatory Department. No study has been dropped from 
aaiy of these Departments, but the method of stating what is retpaired in 
each, has been simplified in the present Catalogue. 

I. 

Classical Department. 

The studies in this Department, required for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, 
are as follows : 

FIRST TERM. 
Virgil — Bucolics and Georgics : Prose Composition, Gildersleeve s Grammar 

and Exercise Book. 
Herodotus ; Greek Prose Composition and Greek Grammar. 
Universal History — Anderson. 
Universal Algebra — Robinson. 
Elocution. 

SECOND TERM. 

Horace — Odes and Epodes : Latin Prose Composition (continued). 

Homer — Iliad : Greek Prose Composition (continued). 

English Literature — Tyler's, Morley. 

Geometry (completed): Solid and Plane Trigonometry (commenced). 

Elocution. 

THIRD TERM. 
Cicero — De Senectute and De Amicitia : Exercises in Latin Prose Composi- 
tion. 
Homer — Odyssey ; Prose Composition. 
Constitution of the United States and of West Virginia. 
Plane Trigonometry (completed); Spherial Geometry and Trigonometry. 
Elocution. 

& & 



® 



WEST VIRGINIA I Ni\ 



SOPHOMOP-E yBA*D. 

FIRST TERM. 
Xenophon —Memorabilia ; Exercif 
Rhetoric— Hill. 

Mensuration: Surveying; Navigation. 
Chemistry, [norganic Eliot and Stan 
Elocution. 

SECOND TERM 

Horace Satires and Epistles ; Exercises in Latin Oom] 

English Philology. 

Analytical Geometry and Differentia] Calculus Loomii 

Chemistry < Organic. 

Elocution. 

THIRD TERM. 

Li\_\ Lincoln: i Latin Composition. 

Plato — Crito and Apology Exercises in Greek Composition 

Botany — (Tray. 

[ntegral Calculus Loomis. Optional . 

Elocution. 

TTJ2>TTOTl YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Euripides 1 Alcestis; or French. 
Mental Philosophy : The Intellect— Haven and I 
Physics, General Principles Solids and Fluids. 
Physical Geography Guyol . 

SECOND TERM. 
Tacitus — Germauia and Agricola; Latin Composition ; or French. 
Mental Philosophy: The Sensibilities and the Will Haven and 
Physics — Pneumatics, Acoustics and ' Iptics 

Zoology— Nicholson. 

THIRD TERM. 

Demosthenes on the Crown, with Written Exeroil • n«h 

Logic — Coppee. 

Human Anatomy and Physiology — Draper. 

SE1TIOR "STE-A-R. 

FIRST TERM. 
Cicero*— De Officii* : with Written Exercises on Historical Sol 

man. 
Moral Philosophy- -Way land. 
History of Civilization Guizot 

Geology, Litholo-i.al. Dynamical and Histoiioal LeConta, with <•• ■ • 

Excursions. 

&_! & 



& <£ 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



SECOND TERM- 
Sophocles — (Edipus Tyrannus; or German. 
Elements of Criticism — Lord Kames. 
Astronomy — Newcomb. 
International Law — Woolsey. 

THIRD TERM, 
Political Economy — Chapin's. Waylaud. 
Tacitus — Annals ; or German. 
Astronomy (completed). 
Christian Evidences : Lectures by the President. 

If, in this Department, the student selects the French or German instead of 
the Latin or Greek, he shall be required to study them respectively, during 
three successive terms, and such selection must be made at the beginning of 
the Junior or Senior Year. The text books for the Junior Year are the same 
as those of the Scientific Freshman, and for the Senior Year, the same as 
Junior Scientific. 

II. 



Scientific Pepartment, 

The studies in this Department required for the Degree of Bachelor of 
Science are the following : 

PBESHMA1T "TEiLB. 

FIRST TERM. 

University Algebra — Robinson. 

French— Languellier and Mon^anto's French Course. 

Universal History — Anderson. 

Chemistry (Inorganic) — Eliot and Storer. 

Elocution. 

SECOND TERM. 

Geometry (completed), Solid and Plane Trigonometry (commenced;. 

French — French Course (continued): French Reader. 

English Literature — Tyler's, Morley . 

Chemistry (Organic). 

Elocution. 

THIRD TERM. 

Plane Trigonometry (completed) — Spherial Geometry and Trigonometry. 
French — French Course (completed): Telemaque (Suremie's). 
Constitution of the United States and of West Virginia. 
Botany — Gray's School and Field Book. 
Elocution. 

& : & 



\ ii:..ivi \ 



SOPHOMORE -_T — 



--IT. 



'7 



Mensuration; >. 

French- Voltaire, Charles XII, I 

Rhetoric Hill. 

Physics i l Principles Bolide | 

Elocution. 

Analytical Geometry, and I 

i . Classical Plays— Jo; 

Chemical Anarj 

Physics I'n.l', oustics, < »i 

Elocution, 

THIHI) TBBM. 
Agriculture. 
Integral Calculus— Loomis. 

li (Optional -Pylodet's Classical I. I 
Chemical Ana: 
Elocution. 

ttt£tio:r, ^te-ajr, 

FIRST TKHM. 

urology. 
German— Woodbury's Complete 

Mental Philosophy. The [ntellecl Haven and I 
Physical Geography Guyot. 

SECOND TERM. 
Analytical Mechanics- Peck. 
German — Grammar 'continued ; German Reader 

Nicholson. 
Mental Philosophy The Sensibilities and the Will B 

THIHD TBBM. 
Mineralogy 1 tana's Manual. 

an Grammar and Free Exercises ; Schiller's Jungl 

i 

Human Anatomy and Physiology Dl 

FIBST TBBM. 

Moral Philosophy Wayland. 
German- < to the's [phigenia in Taur 
History of Civilization- < taizot 

Lithological, Dynamical and Historical—] 
cursiona 



ST" *& 



28 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



SECOND TERM 

International Law — Woolsey. 

German — Fouque's Undine ; Grammar and Exercises. 

Elements of Criticism — Lord Karnes. 

Astronomy — Descriptive and Physical. * 

THIRD TERM. 

Evidences of Christianity — Lectures by the President. 

Political Economy — Chapin's, Way land. 

German — (Optional) — Evans' German Literature ; Grammar and Exercises. 

Practical Astronomy — Calculation and Construction cf Eclipses, verified by 

the Nautical Almanac. 
Geology — LeConte. 



Ill 



Department of Engineering. 



The studies in this Department for the first, second and third years are 
the same as in the Scientific Course. For the Senior year they are as follows : 

FIRST TERM. 

Civil Engineering— Mahan. 
Moral Philosophy — Wayland. 
Physical Geography — Guyot. 

Geology — Lithological, Historical and Dynamical — LeConte, with Geological 
Excursions. 

SECOND TERM. 

Military Engineering — Mahan. 
Astronomy — Descriptive and Physical. 
International Law — Woolsey. 
Elements of Criticism — Kames. 

THIRD TERM. 

Gillespie on Location, Construction and Improvement of Eoads and Railroads. 

Astronomy —Practical. 

Evidences of Christianity ; Lectures by the President. 

The studies of the Modern Languages are the same as in the Scientific Course. 

In addition to the text books prescribed to the Students of Modern Lan- 
guages, they are required to read a prescribed Course of Literature and write 
exercises, both by dictation and translation, in French and German. 

& £ 



sr 



ik'.IM \ ■ • 



I Y 
/VllLlTARY PEPART M 
In addition to the daily drillfl U Infantr\ 

theoretically instructed in Military B 

i [R81 ^ i 

First Term [nfantrj I i I School <>f th< Boldier 9 
pany. 

SECOND TERM — Instruction for Skirmisher- hnll 

Third 1 i km Brigade Drill ; Military Signaling M 

NDY1 \i: 
Tebm Cavalry raotioa. 

TERM Military History 
Third Term Artillery Tactics. 

1 1 1 1 1 : 1 • Y\ 

First Term Artillery- Tactics, concluded 

Second Term Military Engineering Ernst's . Field I 

Third Tebm Advance Guard and Ontpost Dnl - 

1'H Kill 1 

First Term Strategy and Art of W 

Second Term Ordnance and Gunnery Benton's). 

Third Term— Military Law and Courts Martial Benits 1 

Dress Parades, Reviews, Inspections, and Guard Mom' 
often a-- deemed expedient throughoul the entin 

Tin other studies in this Department, are those of the Claaskal or the 
Scientific, Departments respectively. 



V 

Agricultural Depaptment. 

The studies in this Department are, at present, • 
oourse. Students having creditably completed th : stoourae, will be entitl* I 
receive a certificate to thai effect 

Fl 1 :sr Y EA 1 t. 

I n.-l PERM. 
Inorganic < Ihemistry. 
Physics Solids and Fluids. 
General Bistorj . 
French or ( terman < Optional 

3* 



3* <£ 

30 WEST VIRGINIA IWIYERSITY. 



Organic Chemistry ; Zoology. 

English Literature. 

French or German Optional). 



SECOND TERM 



THIRD TERM. 



Botany and Vegetable Physiology. 

Heat, Magnetism and Electricity. 

Plane Trigonometry. 

Constitution of the United States and of West Virginia. 



SECOND YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Analytical Chemistry. Geology. Meteorology. 
Chain and Compass Surveying. 

SECOND TERM. 

Analysis of Soils : Entomology. 

Astronomy. 

French or German 'Optional . 

THIRD TERM. 
Allen's Farm Book. 

Gillespie, on Boads and Boad Making. 
Political Economy. 
Evidences of Christianity: Lectures by the President. 

The Subjects for Lectures during the Course, are the following 



FIRST YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

The Chemistry. Structure and Physiology of Plants. 

On the Water. Atmosphere and Soil, as Belated to Vegetables. 

On Tillage. Draining and Manuring. 

SECOND TERM 

On Domestic Animals and their Digestion. Bespiration, Assimilation and 

Excretion. 
On the Composition. Preparation and Value of Different Kinds of Food. 
On Milk. Butter. Cheese. Flesh and Wool, as Agricultural Products. 

THIRD TERM. 

On Horticultural and Kitchen Gardening. 

On the Propagation. Training and Culture of Fruit Trees, the Vine, Small 
Fruits and Vegetables. 

& & 



& '7 

U I'M \ I! 

SECOND YEA R. 
FIR81 I i 

Ou the St;q>l< drain, Foi 

States, and their V 
On tlif Preparation of Boil, Seeding, Cull 

for Market. 
On the Origin and Natural History of Don 
On Entomology, and the [needs Useful and Hurtful 

On the Raising, Can-. Characteristics and Adaptation of I 

Domestic Animals. 
On Cattle for B< ef «>r Draft, and Sheep for \^<»>1 <>r M n: 
On Horses. Swine and Poultry. 

Ou Pasturing, Boiling and Stall Feeding. 
Ou Tobacco, Hops and Forestry. 

THIRD TERM 

On Kural Economy. 

Ou the History of Agriculture, with Bk 

Modern Times ; and in Foreign Lands. 
Ou the Adaptation of Farming to the Soil. Climate Market and oti 

and Economical Conditions. 

On the Different Systems of Husbandry 

Mixed Farming. 

Law Department. 

MATRICULATION FEE |10. 

The full course will embrace Common and Statu* La* Mei ml • I 
Equity and Evidence, and Constitutional and International I 

The text-books used In the course of Common and Statute La« will be 
Blackstone'a Commentaries, Stephen on Pleading 
Commentaries Real Property , and for vferena th< I odeol Wesl 
and the subsequent Acts of the West Virginia 1.- gislature 

In the branch of Equity, Evidence and Mercantile Law. the 1 ka will 

Ldams's Equity, the let Volun 
Mercantile Law. 

These text-books will be supplemented bj at least four lectin 
week, and it will be the endeavor so to incoi 
statutory changes in tin- Common Law as to render it 
students from other Stan- to incur the expense of purchasing th< • 
Virginia Code and subsequent statutes. 

The text-hook used in Constitutional Law will be the 
This however, will be supplemented by lectures upoi 

& 



32 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



History from the Colonial period, through the Continental and Confederation 
eras successively to the adoption of our present Constitution in 1788. The 
Constitution itself, aid those decisions of the'Supreme Court of the United 
States interpreting its provisions will also be the subject of lectures. 

The text-book used in International Law Avill be Woolsey's Introduction 
to the Study of International Law. Each day before the lecture there will 
be an oral examination on the subject of the lecture of the preceding day> 
and of such portions of the text-book as were the subject of the lecture. 
Besides the daily examinations there will be two general examinations- 
One of these will be held in the latter part of February, and the other in 
the last of May. The intermediate one in February will embrace that part 
of the course which was gone over up to that time, and the final one that 
part which was passed over from February to May. They will both be con- 
ducted in writing, and the questions will have numerical values attached to 
each. Certificates of distinction will be awarded at the end <f the session 
to those students whose answers in the general examination shall aggregate 
three-tourtlis of the aggregate values attached to the questions, and whose 
ans-ersin the daily oral examinations shall have been uniformly good. 
Care will be taken that these certificates shall be awarded only to those who 
have been habitually studious, and have made steady progress in the ac- 
quisition of the fundamental principles of their profession. 

It is believed that the holder of one of these certificates will have no 
trouble in passing an examination by the Judges for admission to the Bar 
of any State in the Union. 

As the Common and Statute Law, Equity, Evidence and Mercantile Law- 
will constitute that portion of the whole course for which the practitioner 
will have daily use, the certificates will be given for proficiency in those 
branches only. 

Constitutional and International Law are parts of the regular curriculum, 
and students attending the University for the purpose of becoming practi- 
tioners will not be required to take the Constitutional and International 
Course. 

Mxdical Department. 

The Board of Regents, at its annual meeting in June, 1878, established a 
Chair of Anatomy, Physiology and Hygiene, and elected as Professor in 
this Department, Hugh W. Brock, M D.,of Morgantown, whose Course of 
Instruction, it was enacted, should occupy two of the three terms of the 
University year. 

This chair was designed by the Board to teach the Students of the Uni- 
versity a more accurate and thorough knowledge of the structure and organ- 
ization of the human body and of the laws of health than is ordinarily 
taught in the usual college courses. 

It was designed also to serve as a nucleus around which, it is hoped, a 
fully organized Medical Department, in connection with the University, 
will at no distant day be established. 

a *s 



s* -*a 



n 



Pursuant to this action of the Board, Dr. i 
at the beginninfrof the Spring term 
edon Anatomy, Physiology and Hygiene, ill 11 
diagrams upon the blackboard, by Anatomical plat 
rati. >ns wet and dry, and by d 
self either in the presence of the claw or imi 
Endeavoring to carry ont the object of the Board, i 
lectures upon Descriptive Anatomy, taught much 
Anatomy, explaining the different form* 
liable, demonstrating upon this subject th< 

as of the body, and, in connection therewith p 
cadawr, in presence of the clai 

Buch as lithotomy, herniotomy, tracheotomy, divi 
the relief of Btrabismue and clubfoot, ampul 
arteries 

Minute Anatomy has been taught by the UB6 of the mi 

The Anatomical elements of the solid tissues and fluids o! th< 
also many interesting and beautiful physiological phenomen 
circulations of the blood in the frog's fool and ciliary motion I 
the Bpermatazoa, epithelium from the frog's month, the Fresh W 
sel and many diflerent form- of [nfusoria have been shown the clssi nndst 
the microscope. 

In eases where it was practicable todo so patients from pi 
have been brought before the da— . examined and | lini- 

cal lectures delivered upon the diseases with which tl 
flicted. Several important Surgical operations upon private pal;. 
been performed before the class. 

The method of examining the urine ami ether fluids of the body in a 
stateof disease as well as of health have been taught, chemically and ■ 
Bcopically. 

In the lecture- upon Physiology and Hygiene the means of i 
each organ and the body as a wholein a state of health I impressed 

upon the mind ol the student. 

The interest taken by the members of the cl i 
ment of the University, as manifested by their punctual 
close attention to the lectures, and also by their evident oompx 
instruction imparted, as evinced by the d inations to which they are 

subjected upon the topics of the previous Lecture, has been highly gi 
their Instructor and lias fully vindicate 1 the wisdom of tl 
in establishing this Department of the University. 

The class composing the Medical Department is made up as fol 

First— Of Members of the Junior Class who are reqn 
and Physiology, in course, during the Junior "» 

Secondly— Of such State Oa lets as elect to take the Course in t 
ment and who are recommended by the Faculty as qualified bg \ 
study to do so. 

Thirdly— Of Medical Students, proper, whether or n..t 
any other Department of the Qniyersity. 

&^ . 



in 



34 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Neither Juniors nor Cadets are required to pay any additional fee to that 
already paid as regular students of the University. 

All others are required to pay a fee of ten dollars for admission to the Lect- 
ures. 

The same course of Instruction given during the present year will be given 
during the Spring Term of the University Year of 1880-81. 

For such Students of Medicine who, on account of limited means or time, are 
not prepared to take a full College Course but who desire to take, in connect- 
ion with Medicine, studies in other departments of the University which are 
germane to and essentially necessary to an intelligent study of Medicine as a 
Science, for example, an Elementary Course in Latin and Greek and a Course 
in Chemistry, special and favorable provision will be made. 




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36 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Preparatory Department. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 

Geography — Guyot's Common School ; Map Drawing. 
Arithmetic— Stoddard's Complete. 
English Grammar — Etymology. 
Latin (commenced). 

SECOND TERM. 

Geography— Guyot's (continued) ; Map Drawing. 
Arithmetic (continued). 
English Grammar — Syntax. 
Latin — Grammar and Reader. 

THIRD TERM. 

Arithmetic (completed). 
English Grammar — Analysis of Sentences. 
Latin — Grammar and Readers. 
Greek— Bunion's First Lessons. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Algebra — Robinson's Elementary, to Involution. 

Book-keeping. 

Caesar (two books) — Latin Grammar. 

Greek — Grammar and Reader. 

SECOND TERM. 

Algebra — Robinson's Elementary (completed). 

History of the United States— Anderson's. 

Cicero's Orations (three orations) — Bullion's Latin Grammar. 

Greek — Grammar and Reader. 

THIRD TERM. 

Geometry — Robinson (first four books). 
History of the United States (completed). 
Virgil — Three Books of iEneid : Latin Grammar. 
Xenophon's Anabasis (two books) ; Greek Grammar. 

Regular lessons in Writing, Spelling. Elocution and English Composition 
from beginning. 

The course preparatory to the Scientfiic. the Engineering and the Military 
Departments is the same as the above with the substitution of Citizens' Manual, 

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W1>T VIRGINIA I'Sh I 



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Physiology, Natural PhHoeophy and StoddanTi m. • • ,: \ r -.•:.■ 

term respectively, for the studies of Greek. 

The studies preparatory to the Agricultural I topart i follows : 

First Term— Algebra : Arithmetic; Grammax :i y. 

Second Term — Algebra ; Arithmetic; Grama g 

Third Term— Geometry ; Aritlnn 




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38 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



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(General §£ewarlts* 



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\ EB8IT1 . 

TIk- We-t Virginia University owes it- • 
bounty of the United States Government, th 
ginia, and the citizens "i Morganto* el < >n the 2d of J o 
States Congress passed an act granting pnblic lands to tin 
and territories which should provide Schools for the pro 
tare and Mechanic Arts. Under this act, thirty tb 

-■ aators and Representatives in < loi 
State. The proceeds of the sale of these Congressional landi 
000. 

The Constitution of West Virginia makes it the dutj of th< 
to "foster and encourage Moral, Intellectual, Scientific and Agricultu 
improvements; and to make provision for the organisation oi 
tions of learning as the best interests oi educations 

The National gift was, therefore, accepted by the Legislature, and 
appointed to organise the [nstitution, with instruction to "establish 
partments of Education in Literature - 
tary Tactics— including a Preparatory Department." 

The. Legislature, realizing the value of Buch an Institution, its i i 
worth to the Stan- and Nation, its indispensable 
mountain Commonwealth, and in pursuance of its constituti 
increased endowment to aboul $110,000, with annual appi 
eurrent and contingent expenses. \- uo part of the I 
can be applied to the erection of buUdii nth only 

for the purchase of an experimental far... , the Legislature 
provision for the supply and keeping in order of inch b 
growth of the Institution may, from time to time, demand. 
ofWesI Virginia requires that she furnish her sons the b. 
ucational advantages within her own borders. For th, d 
West Virginia resources, it is necessary tha, W, »t N i «W 

be educated on West Virginia soil. _ 

& 



40 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



The citizens of Morgantown, long noted for their generosity and keen ap- 
preciation of educational advantages, contributed in grounds, buildings and 
money, about $ 50,000. 

The University stands, therefore, in important relations to Nation and 
State, and is bound to the sacred performance of all duties growing out of 
these relations. 

NAME AND GOVERNMENT. 

At the beginning, in common with some other National Colleges, it was 
simply called the " Agricultural College " Having been, however, fully 
adopted by the State, and the means originally supplied to aid in its estab- 
lishment being further supplemented by the Legislature, an act was passed, 
pursuant to the recommendation of the Governor, ordering that it should 
thereafter be known by the style and designation of " West Virginia Uni- 
versity." It is under the immediate oversight of a Board of twelve 
Eegents, one from each Senatorial district, appointed by the Governor, and 
required to report biennially, through the Governor to the Legislature. The 
bitterness of partisan and sectarian disputes is excluded from its halls 
and every effort made to secure to each student the full advantage of a 
broad and manly culture. 

SCOPE 

This is entirely in accord with the original design of the institution, as seen 
in the first paragraph of these " General Remarks. " The act of Congress 
contemplated the founding of institutions that would furnish not only 
"practical" but also "liberal education " — education " in the several pur- 
suits," and just as certainly " in the several professions," of life. It forbids 
the exclusion of "classical studies," and requires attention to Agricultural, 
and Mechanical Education, Military Tactics, etc. The act of the Legisla- 
ture contemplated a school of general instruction, and directed the Board 
to organize several distinct departments as above enumerated, in the in- 
terest of the people of the State and of the Nation. 

We trust that in the extent and in the quality of its work, and thorough- 
ness of its discipline and culture, as well as adaptation to the demands of 
the age, the UxVIVersity will prove itself deserving of no second rate posi- 
tion among the institutions of our land. It designs, by its instruction in 
Literature and Art ; in Language, ancient and modern ; in Mathematics, pure 
and applied ; in the Sciences, agricultural, physical, mental, moral and social ; 
by its recitations, lectures, examinations and elevating influences, to educate, 
inform and discipline the student's mind ; to strengthen his moral princi- 
ples, and supply such general and generous, as well as special, culture as 
will best prepare him for success and usefulness in any pursuit or profession 
in life. 

OPPORTUNITIES AFFORDED. 

The work which the University is accomplishing can be readilv under- 

^ & 



5T~ "S 



V [RGINI v rsi\ RRRITY. 



stood from the Courses oi Study prescribed in each of the d 

already pet forth. 

We call Bpecial attention, however, to some U stares •■'■ th< 

pnrtment, viz : 

I. \\v \\i> MBDICTNI 

The Board of Regents at their^meeting in Jane, 
toward the creation of Departments 

A Chair of Law and Equity was'establiahed, and Bon .1' B I 
eon county, waa elected to fill th< same. Mr La •- I 
nation the Executive Committee, upon the pn 
Mr. St. George Tucker Brooke, of Jefferson county, to till th. 
Brooke's lectures during the current v. ar bave"d< moustrated I 
fitness for the Professorship he tills, and the auth 
entertain the confident hope that the School of Lara mfBi sooi 
most attractive features 

The Board of Regents elected Bugh w Brook, If. D 
Anatomy, Physiology and Hygiene, Dr. Brock brings to th 
duties great natural aptitude, long experience and prof< 
medical profession. His lectures during the Bpringtermof 18) 
instructive and deservedly popular, these two Departments 
felt need in the University, and will greatly incresse the Dumber oi 
as well as elevate the character of the school. 

THE AGRICULTURAL 

Young men who desire to study only such brancheses will enable tb ■ I 
to pursue his calling with intelligence and profit will here find, 
of time and means, all they need in the wsv of a sound, practical 
They are not required to study any language but their own. nor go In n 
matics farther than land survryin-. Those dencienl in element 
spend at least one year in Preparatory studies before entering this ,!■ 

THF MILITARY. 

The law provides that five Cadets may be appointed for each - 
trict in the State. These are educated freeofcost for tuition. 1 i 
Ac For such as desire a military and engmi ■ "<.n. tins department 

is provided. Cadets, however, are not limited to this, but may pur.,., 
studies in anv department of th.- Drivers**, subject to the g< oeral 
laid down in the Code for the Cadets. Other students are permitted to drill, on 
condition that they provide themselves with the neat and becoming unif 
the Corps Drill occupies one hour on each of four days in th, 
United States Government liberally furnishes the special imp] 
this department. These are of the latest and most imp- 

Applicants for admission to the Corps should add.. 

atorial District in which they reside, statu 

as to character, etc. Applicant* must be betw« 

of age. The members of the Cadet Corpse* genersflv 

best scholars in the University. 

g^ 6 - " J 



.irs 



3T *g 

42 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



THE PREPARATORY. 

Comparatively few of our young men in West Virginia have home advantages 
for properly and fully preparing themselves to enter upon regular College studies. 
This department has proved a fruitful source of supply for the higher classes, 
and also the means of maintaining an elevated grade of preliminary scholarship 
for admission to them. As the High^_ Schools, Academies and Graded Schools 
of the State increase in number and efficiency, in the same proportion will the 
necessity of this Department diminish. Meanwhile, and until their increase 
and fuller development, it cannot be dispensed with without lowering the stand- 
ard of Collegiate Study proper, or shutting out from the advantages of the 
Institution many of the best and most promising young men of the State. 

Nowhere else can young men be better prepared for advanced studies, or, if 
this is not contemplated, accomplish more thoroughly and advantageously such 
studies as are here provided. 

Those who do not contemplate a full course, can also here be furnished with 
instruction in such preparatory studies as they may desire to pursue. 

An Optional Course is allowed those students whose special tastes or necessi- 
ties prevent them from graduating in any of the regular Departments. Parents 
and guardians of students who expect to attend the University are, however, 
earnestly advised to direct their studies with a view to entering one of the regu- 
lar Departments. The attention of those who teach in our intermediate schools 
is also respectfully invited to this suggestion. 

During the Spring term of each year (beginning on the second Wednesday 
of March), unusual facilities are provided for all who may desire, either to take 
a short and limited course, or to fit themselves for the higher grades of teach- 
ing, clerking, or other specialties. All needed assistance in this work being 
rendered by the several Professors of the University, superior advantages are 
thus afforded to all comers. 

NORMAL INSTRUCTION. 

When desired, classes are formed in the Theory and Practice of Teaching, 
under the charge of an able and experienced instructor. Lectures are from 
time to time delivered before the class by the several members of the Faculty. 
The daily contact of the students in the class-room with their teachers, observing 
their methods and studying their plans, affords fine opportunities in this depart- 
ment of instruction. Nowhere in the State are afforded better facilities for 
practical Normal drill. The graduates of the University have been remarkably 
successful in securing desirable positions as teachers, and have in almost 
every instance full}' satisfied their employers, retaining their positions as 
long as they desired them. The Faculty of the University cheerfully ren- 
der their assistance to capable students and graduates desiring positions as 
teachers 

REQUISITES FOR ADMISSION. 

I. All candidates for admission to any department of the University must 
present satisfactory evidence of good moral character. 

& £ 



8 '.? 



Y. 



II. Students coming from oi 
honorable dismission from the sam< 
Senior Class after the beginnii 

III. Those eutering as Students f r n '. • 
University, must sustain an examination ii 
paratorj School of the University, • ■!■ th< ii 

I V. < Sandidates for advanced Btandii 
previous Btudies ot tin- department which 

V. The regular examination for admisi 
pursued the preliminary studies in the P 
vcrsitv. will take place <>n Frid 
first day of the tirst term. 

VI. Candidates Bhould procure 

versity, also the Treasurer's receipt fortuitioi 
for enrollment 

\'II. Applicants for admission to the P 
an approved examination in spelling, reading, wril 
elements of English grammar, arithmetic thr 

VIII. Students are required to pronounce I i 
the Bo-called Continental method. 

i:\.\mi\ 

I. Each Btudent, at the close ol the Term, shall itand • publl 
examination upon all the studies v. hich 1m- has punned during 
student shall be excused for aon-attend 
upon presentation of a reason which may be consid. 

-mdent wh,. may be absent, and no! thai 
continue in connection with the University. 
student shall have failed to attain a standing 
to B failure in examination, he -hall be informed of the fi 
be allowed to stand a special examination under the - 1 
tinu- before thr beginning ol the nexl Col 

11 TheexaminationofeaehclassshaUbeconducUMibyacommitt* 
dof three members of the Faculty, who shall, within three 
preceding the examination, select a series of quest* 
more than fifteen, in number, and submit the same in writing I 
at the time of examination. 

11! Lfter examination the committee shall examine I 
fcermine the standing made bj each student in examin "tell t> 

8idere d the equivalent of one month's standing in i 

IV Before a student shall be entitled to enter a hi 
a scale of ten, have attained a mimimum standi. 
Longing to his class, which shall be determined by thi 
tions and examinations. 

V. student. »ho l.,.v.. not t»l - theUnii 

„riv»l,re tth.«»W-totheP™«d«.t.»dbyhta. 

3* 



44 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



department and studies as they may desire and be prepared to enter/ When 
a regular course of study is once adopted, the student is not allowed to vary 
from it, or change to another, without permission. 

TUITION. 

Tuition in the Preparatory Department. - - - $5 00 per term. 

" in other departments 8 00 " 

Contingent Fee in Preparatory Dep't 2 00 " 

" " " other departments - - - - 2 00 " 

BOARDING AND EXPENSES. 

The University has no Dormitories. This is a matter both of neces- 
sity and policy ; of necessity, because the State has not been able to furnish 
money to build dormitories ; of policy, because it is thought'better for the 
students to be distributed among the people of the University town, amen- 
able to the common laws and sentiments of society. The public bounty stops 
at furnishing free instruction, leaving to private hands the providing of 
maintenance. 

Three methods of boarding are practiced : (1) Self boarding, by individ- 
uals, or, more commonly, by small groups or colonies composed of members 
of the same family, or of neighboring families. Rooms are hired, and furni- 
ture, provisions and fuel are brought from home. When well managed, 
this is an excellent and very economical mode of living. From $1.00 to 
$1.50 a week per pupil may be set down as the cost. (2) Club boarding. 
This has been practiced for some time and is an excellent system. A com- 
pany of young men rent a number of rooms or an entire house and then 
organize and operate a boarding club. The price of boarding in clubs va- 
ries from $1.50 to $2.25 per week, including rent of room. (3) Boarding 
in families. The difficulties formerly encountered in procuring suitable 
places for students desiring to board in families, have disappeared. Good 
boarding can be found at reasonable prices ranging from $2.50 to $3.00. 

Incidental expenses depend on the habits of the student. The law pro- 
hibits students incurring debts at stores, groceries, &c, except on written 
order of parents, guardian or teacher. Unnecessary and lavish expendi- 
tures induce not only waste of time and means, but neglect of study and 
formation of bad habits. 

The necessary expenses for the college year of forty-one weeks are less here 
than in any other place known to us, where the same quality of instructions 
and other equal advantages are furnished. A young man of moderately 
economical habits need not spend more than $175.00 per year including board, 
room-rent, tuition, etc., and hare every advantage afforded by the University. 

PRIZES. 

The Regents' Prizes. — To the student who shall write the best essay 
I upon a given subject, $25. To the student who shall be adjudged the best 

ft £ 



3* « 



VIRTtlNMA 1 • 



declaimer. $15. These priiei to be swarded aft. r pob] 
committee of citizens appointed by the Faculty. 

These wen- awarded at the last conn ■( 

Essay — Frank Coi 

Declamation -K. ( i. Yat. - 

The President's Prizes In tin- annual i the Columbian 

Parthenon Literary Societies, the President of the Unix* i 
ing prizes : To the successful Debater, $40; to th< 
to the successful Essayist, $26 ; to tl ,1 Declaim 

to be awarded by a committee chosen in such manner SI tin Literal 3 
tie9 may prescribe. 

D» EF1 !' 

The rules of the University require thai every itudenl >-hall ho in his place 
at all stated exercises from the opening to the close of *ith 

the University. A record is kept in which sre entered the gl 
ship of each student, his absence from the m the institution, 

tardiness,*or failure in recitation, unless satisfactorily \n 

abstract of this record, is sent at the close of each term, to pa 
dians, so that they may see what and how their soni and war' 
and how th»y stand in scholarship and dep trtment In case oi D( 
irregularity, or other misconduct, the students will be privately sdmooii 
and the parent or guardian will be informed of the fsct M- 
to study will, if persisted in, insure dismissal from the Unin I 
student is allowed to leave the precincts of the University da 
without special permission. 

The attention of parents and guardians is especially called to the fact thai 
all exercises begin promptly on the day stated in the calendar, and thai 
essential to the best interest of the student and of his I 
punctual in his place from the first davof the term till the Is 
will be accepted for absence unless such absence ifl unavoidable. It 
be distinctly understood that students are allowed to enter only on 
that they comply with the rules of the University, and apply themi 
punctually and without interruption to their prescrih 
duties once assumed require a Btudenffl full time, an. I no i ctrs i 
upbv himself or imposed by others, and no r the men 

of the student or his friends can be allowed to interfere with tfa 

The government of the students proceeds upon an sntin 
Kindness gentleness and trustfuln.- are relied upon rather than ■• 
impatience and suspicion. In such an atmosphere, all nob* and manly 
ties ripen, and students learn to demean then 
Students are encouraged and incited to form habits oJ soonom; 
reliance, truthfulness and purity, and thus to 1 ome ■ law unto themselves. 

RELIGIOUS QJ8TR1 I no»fl aND worship. 

The exercises of each day are opened with reading th- B 
and prayer, at which all the students are reqnn 

&>_ -» 



5* $ 

46 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



also required, unless] for sufficient reason excused, to attend regularly some 
place of religious worship on the Sabbath, and on all occasions to treat the in- 
stitutions of religion with respect. The President of the University frequently 
preaches on Sunday afternoon in the chapel hall. The institution is entirely 
free from sectarian control or domination. 

In the internal management and practical working of the institution, there 
is not now, and never has been, the slightest denominational friction. 

LIBRARY. 

A respectable beginning towards a University Library has been made. 
About five thousand volumes have been carefully selected and placed on its 
shelves, including, not only many choice and valuable books of reference, but 
also standard works in the various departments of History, Biography, Theol- 
ogy, Agriculture, Arts, Science and General Literature. During the past year, 
about one hundred and fifty volumes have been added by purchase to the 
Library, including a number of very valuable works on Literature and Science. 

We respectfully request the friends of education to make contributions to 
its shelves. In addition to those hitherto granted, the following donations 
have been received during the year : 

Rev. S. Hitchens — Twenty -three (miscellaneous) volumes. 

Commonwealth of West Virginia — State Publications. 

Department of the Interior — Ten vols. Public Documents. 

Hon. Frank Hereford - Public Documents. 

Hon. H. G. Davis — Public Documents. 

Hon. B. F. Martin —Public Documents. 

Daniel B. Lucas — The Maid of Northumberland. 

Bureau of Navigation — American Ephemeris and Nautical Almanac for 
1882, &c. 

Nearly all the Weekly journals of the State, the Daily Wheeling Register, 
the Wheeling Intelligencer, and valuable religious papers of all leading religious 
denominations are gratuitously sent to the reading room of the University. 

MUSEUM, APPARATUS, &c. 

The University is in possession of apparatus requisite for thorough illus- 
tration of Chemistry and Physics. 

Several valuable articles of apparatus have been obtained for the depart- 
ment of Astronomy and Physics, including a Smithsonian Barometer, by 
Greene, of New York ; a Sextant, by Crichton, of London, and a Clock with 
Zinc Compensation, by E. Howard & Co., Boston. A seven-foot Telescope 
has been constnicted by John Byrne, of New York. It is equatorially 
mounted with right ascension and declination circles, and is a first-class instru- 
ment in every respect. 

The department of History has been furnished with a large map of the 
United States, and a fine set of Bretschneider and Spruner's Historical Wall 
Maps, ten in number, from the German publishing house of Jutus Perthes, of 
Gotha. Three of White's new Maps of West Virginia have also been provided 
for use in different departments of the University. 

£> & 



5* 






The Museum contains - 
cabinets, together with many irm | 

History. We n qu< -t all ■■ I 
tens for the nraseui 
and alcoholic Bpecimena of as 
and carefully labelled with the name of thi 
2,000 specimens of miner 

The vicinity of the Tim 
practical ( teologg Esp< J attentioi 

The laboratory of Practical Ch< mist 
the present La devoted chiefly to analysis, with il 

i 1 EONS I" THE MUSE! M 

William M. Hyiand Arrow-headf 

Island. 

I I ». Brooki Fossa! tooth from M ■ • I 
aoer 8. Wade Fossil Colamite fron 

IMI ED ST \ l l > 8IGNA1 • 

By direction of General Meyer, Chiel B 
station has been established .it tin University for the 1 
Agriculture and Science. It is. at present, in 
s. r B \nny. Students are by this means furnish* 
for the study of Meteorology and related ral 
f idly record.,1 observations taken by means of the n 
will furnish accurate and reliable data for 
in West Virginia, By this means also, the a< 
river men generally, at Pittsburgh, Wheeli 
can be reliably advised of special mov< ments in tie- i 
gation. Corporal Merrill also • 

i. Hi k\i:y SO hi ii S. 

There arc two of th.-sr. the Parthenoi 
with the University, supplied with suitable hal 
exercises in Composition, R 

respects, of great advantage to th< student Tic.. 
thestndy of, and acquaintance with, ' - 
of business habite. The anthoritiesof the Unhreimtj wiB 
for inOTeasing the accommodation and uaefuln< 

Morgmtown, the seat of the Dniv< 
bank of the Monongahela r 
aoenery around is exceedingly attract 
been famous for ite social, intellectual and moral cult 
folnesa Coaches Leave every morning b 

a 



48 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



more and Ohio Railroad. There is also a daily conveyance between Morgan- 
town and Uniontown, Pa. Steamboats from Pittsburgh arrive every day 
at Geneva, twelve miles below Morgantown, and Congress has made liberal 
appropriations for the continuance of slackwater navigation in the Monon- 
gahela as far as Morgantown. A place more eligible for the quiet and suc- 
cessful pursuit of Science and Literature is nowhere to be found. 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS. 

The buildings are eligibly situated, and are admirably adapted to the purposes 
of the University. They are immediately outside, and within a few minutes' 
walk of Morgantown. The campus is ample, and is a fine natural park. The 
grounds command a wide and noble prospect ; the town, the river, the bridge, 
the mountains, all feast the eye and soul. The buildings are models of archi- 
tectural beauty and convenience, and are healthfully constructed and heated. In 
addition to Preparatory Hall, the Armory has been furnished, and is now oc- 
cupied. The splendid University Building has also been finished and furnish- 
ed. The Commencement exercises of 1878-0 were held in its spacious and 
elegant Hall. Year by year, all the appointments of the University grow more 
desirable and attractive. It is surely winning its way to the lasting affection 
and deserved support of the people of West Virginia. 




®*NN 



& *5 



w>i,. II. 



\< » 



THE 



ILMYI'INTV BULLETIN 



Wi&l JBnjinia. terrain. 



February, 1875. 







<^? 



MOW ; A Mow N. \V. va.. 

JACOBS A FLEMING. Publisher.. 
1875. 



life f tttMfttif jytcitn, - - $eb*«t*t 187a. 



CONTENTS. 



A Commercial Crisis, ... 2T 

A Shout for Freedom, 2S 

Eloquence, 30 

Senior Performance, 3t 

writ, _ , 32 

Editor's Table ' 

Political.. ..Moi lleme.... Examination 
Contest...- Washington's Birth-tkf.' . I ••-•. 
Reading Room... .Thin.... Wise and 
Otherwise. ... Exchanges*, eld 



tym& «l IMsKiWiM 



TERMS; — Subscription Price?"! 09>ycnir, 75 cents for six months. Single 
Copy 15 cents. . 

r ' ■ • •• 

•'"" *'" ■•■■■■■ . . ! ! 

Advertisements inserted at 50,*oeptig-pei> square for fir.-t insertion, and 25 cent* 

.• each subsequent insertion. Speciarterins for larg -•; > a :e. j 

•j 

, We are not responsible for ai.y article not editorial, and all articles having no 

signature are editorial. 

\ ... A(icl rcS g T 

w. l. Jacobs, \ • ' JACOBS & FI/EMIXG, JBOitorr, 

j.e.fleming, j Box xfa, Morgantown, West Va.f. 



TOE 



UNIVERSITY BULLETIN. 



VNIVKKNITATIS VIBGIXLECM < IDKNTAUh. 



For the Bulletin. 

A COMMERCIAL CRISIS. 



VOL. II. MORGANTOWN, W. VA., FEBRUARY, x8 75 . NO i. 

there is; that the exjiansi 

I and not a can-r "t" the <n- 
The latter theory is evidently 

A Crisis is the point of time when just one. 
any affair or course of action must Let us take a view of I 

terminate or take a new turn; a turn- from quiescence through it- different 
ing point. A Commercial crisis is phases buck attain to quiescence, — 
that point in the course of trade where FJwtqmesca n ce imp rovement 
speculators attempt to realize money fidenee-pros{>crity-vxcit» n\> -n? 
after a season of excessive specula- trading— rush to market in 1. 
tion. The result of this attempt is reelise-prossure--stagnation---di 
a general inability to meet obliga- — qui e sce n ce again. Bupp I 
tions, bankruptcy and prostration of eunistance< indicate rw- i: 
business. The causes of a crisis will of sonic commodity, flealeil I ohuge 
l>c briefly considered. jtheir purchasei mhopeofprofit; th«-ir 

There are two prevalent theories purchase! produce still higher] 
as to a commercial crisis. One is Other speculators arc attr a cted into 
that it originates by mismanagement the business, and their open 
of the banks and an undue expan- cause a still further sdvai 
sion of circulation. The other re- price thut obtains an unnatural . 1. - 
gards banks as passive, and finds the vation, and those who have accumu- 
characteristic phenomenon of the 00- lated a large Stock of the comm o d i ty 
currence in an unlimited extension become anxious to sell Bare is the 
of private credit. One maintains Crisis; the turning of the tide. b> 
thal an expansion of currency al- Btead of advancing, prioai begin to 
ways precedes a crash; the other that decline. HoMen rush Into the mar- 
it is the rise of prices, which always ket to avoid further I their 
precedes a panic, which produces Jeagernfit to Bell now causes 
the -very inconsiderable expansion" and unnatural decline ofprices. M- n 

l« ■ 



?£ 



riff: uNirmstrr bvlletix. 



are unable to meet their demands on sometime cease, if to it we attribute 
account of pressure; stagnation of bus-i the expansion, and a failure in busl- 
ine ensues, and soon distress comes j ness would be a practicable impossi- 
upon the unfortunate traders. Now bility. Take away credit and there 
: lot jeem natural that banks is no danger of a crash. Keepupcred- 
could produce, or aid in producing, it, and extend it, and you are sure 
such phenomena, when we consider! of a panic when eyer the last purchas- 
that very little actual money changes er rushes to market. It is the ina- 
hands even in our most populous j bility of the last buyer to meet in> 
marts. Merchants do not require f mediate demands upon which a long 
much money to effect their trade. — f Tedi tois are depending, which 

Indeed they would rather sell fifty causes a general inability to meet ob- 
thousand dollars worth of commodi- ligations. 

ty on six months time, than lend The foregoing observations hold 
live thousand dollars for the same : as to any and all commodities. Hence 
time. And such is their mode of 'as a commodity is more universally 
doing business. A person may give prevalent, so in proportion will be 
his own promise to pay, or the bank's the generality of the panic, 
promise to pay; to his own there is j But as stocks are more universally 
no limit; those of the bank cannot be a motter of barter and sale than pro- 
issued in excess. A convertible pa- duce, a crash in that market must 
per currency cannot be issued beyond I be more general than in any other, 
a fixed limit; the whole amount of The last panic was the effect of such 
money needed being an invariable trade, hence its general prevalence; 
quantity. Hence the power of mak- caused by the inability, at an unex- 
ing extravagant purchases depends pected change in the stock market, 
not on the amount of circulation, but of a few debtors to meet their credi- 
on the extension of credit. Grant- tors' demands. Hence, pressure — 
ing a double amount of currency in ^urnation-distress-and now, quiet. 

1 .. ( • m-,% x Foolish then the claims of the in- 

circuiation (an impossibility ) even a . . . £ -, , 

v J • v nationists, since confidence restored, 

that could not effect trade, since the by means G f expansion, could but 
surplus must go to the floating cap- accelerate another crash, for although 
ital seeking borrowers. A mountain inflation should for a time relieve 

of indebtedness may be created with- 1 the F«™!«» the confidence 

', j. « , n A anomolbusly restored woule beget a 

out the transfer of a dollar. As the ^^ , xpansion of creditj aild ^ ur . 

amount of convertible currency 13 Ly a crfeis grevter in proportion to 
fixed, the expansion of prices must the amount of depreciable -currency. 



THE UX1YRR 



(Continued.) 
A SHOUT FOR FREEDOM. 1 1 



by p. property. In 

Let us next notice some erf I : ■ 
evil effects of Tobacco on tl • n b 
Owing to the close conn ,„,t wA 

body and mind, no injury can result ifh don n..t kill in | don 

to the former without injury to the in anotl or, I. ft i ... 
latter. The memory, the imagina- tendency. ••Tinu- 
tion, consciousness, reason, in fact Franklin, and 
the entire intellect becomes almost thai two thmgi cannot 
useless. i> rendered lea aUe to per- at once ind both be doM wall, Y. 
form its Functions, and that most better illustration of thii trut 
terrible disease, congestion of the be had than the -i.l 
brain, is very often the result Do You cannot mmta 
you want stronger confirmation of perform other di 
what I say than the thrilling nana- will bi 

tives of Chief Justice Parker, and and i<i bald 

Senator Stafford, of New York? sway. 
Both of these men were disqi 

for the duties of then pi by Devil's workshop," and an idle mm 

the use of Tobacco, and it was not actually tempi Um DeviL If idle 
till they totally abstained'thal they habiti 
could resume work. Lawyer-, phy- eradicate, and tl ■• useful 
sicians, clergymen and business men individual S elythk 

all over the land incapacitated for ■ [rxetU moral i vil. 
duty, broken down, nervous imbe- The 
ciles — the victims of Tobaccol Still |Thi^ cannot be i 
Is a "little matter!" The United Stall 

Next, the moral bearing of the dollars for ?!■• firthj * 
Ribjeet. We hold that Tobacco us- never I my 

big k a great moral evil. Oneofth* good. TmssuB 
first requirements of the moral Ian toHberallj rapport all tl 
is to ,, abstain from the very appear- tiom of learning in the o 
anee of evil." (Jaelmi kw of prop- aisfa all the p a y with 



3 o TEE UNIVERSITY BULLETIN. 

and raiment, with a surplus .of mil- The money spent for Tobacco, by 
lions more than is given for benefi-: an individual, during a life-time, if 
cent purposes by all the Christian saved, would make him and his 
organizations in the land. If the family wealthy", whereas he spends 
Gospel had received the support To- all this money uselessly, little at a 
bacconists have, long ago the world time, perhaps but cents, 
would have been civilized and Chris- (to be Continued.) 

tianized. 

ELOQUENCE. 

j[The following piece was written for the caution and instruc 
tion of lawyers more especially; but we copy it us containing 
matter of importance to all public writers and speakers. _^Hope 
some of our correspondents will profit by it.— Eds.] 

Be brief, be pointed; let your matter stand 

Lucid in order, solid, and at hand; 

Spend not your words on trifles, but condense 

Strike with the mass of thought, not drops of sense: 

Press to the close with vigor once begun, 

And leave (how hard the task Q 'cave off when done; 

"Who draws a labored reasoning out. 

Puts straws ir lines for wind? to whirl about: 

Who draws a tedious tale of learning o'er, 

Counts but the sands on ocean's boundless shore; 

Victory in law is gain''] as battles foughl, 

Not by the number- forces brougln, 

What boots success in skirmishes or in fray, 

If rout and rain following close the day? 

What worth a hundred posts maintained with skill, 

If these all held, the foe is victor still? 

He who would win his c-ause, must frame 

Points of support, and look with steady aim: ■ 

Attack the weak, defend the strong with art. 

Strikeout few blows, but strike them to the heart, 

All scattered fires but end in smo^e and noise, 

The scorn ot men, the idle play of boys. 

Keep, then, this first great precept ever near, 

Short be your speech, your matter strong and clea*. 

Earnest your manner, warm and rich your style, 

Severe in taste, yet full of grace the while; 

So may you reach the loftiest heights of fame, 

And leave, when life is past, a deathless name. 



THE rxivi 

SENIOR PERFORMANCE. 






monpla . 

handled. 

It was our pleasure t<» attend the The foiii 
last Senior performance, i arionbyj P. U 

ducti i - were av< n _•-. w< 11 <\< liv- ject i 



ered and appreciated by the audi i r I it lik< 






. 

.1.1 I' 



first was a paper by Mr. •' 
^dams —not John Quincy norCha 
cis, l>ut Samuel Sh 

call Sugar. Hi- sub 
Til* 1 Morm »n I ' : 

tndled mde< d. The truth was >f "fej •' 

well spoken when Mr. \ lid from tl 

Mornionism * hi- ! > I :»•! bu : i 

- with his tusks festering in < ur ire should • 

)h. Tin only regret i> tb I 



V. did not tell us bow 
- monster. 



to rid 

tlui- -;1< iitlv ... 



Mr. R. II. Dolliver next enti 

with :mi oration By and ; 

Qgth, man's & n 

'• 
J I by sayu . 



that he U very prone I 

own Bp ci s. \ ;• flection, fora mo- 



built ca 

L] ; natureofthi human '»'-' bimaelfwith 

Idhave taught himtheab- nappy h < 111,1 ' 

ty of this opinion. IfCi ' was well pn 

eprecatedsuchapi 

musthavebeen for want { ***** 

saithnot Rn 

i i merely subjective. The produc- 
tion was a L r " »«1 literary perfbi 

Mr. Martin then i 
the "Old Year." Subject w • 



3* 



THE UNIVERSITY BULLETIN. 



Published by request. 

WILL. 



BI A. O. DAYTON. 



by his own daring and couage he in- 
fused a new life into his terrified troops; 
so mnch so, indeed, that they were im- 
patient to attack the very forces that an 
hour before the}- had so greatly feared. 

Again, how litle did Solon, the an- 
Truly has Tennyson .poken in these cient phiIosop - liei . when speaking tothe 
lines. Time past and time present pre-j rXchest king rf ^ ^ ^^ wheQ 
sents us many examples to prove this. | he exc ] a i me< j. 
He whose will is strong may, and is the | up&M ^ anihropos ^^JW' 



M ■well for him whose will is strong ! 
He suffers, but he will not suffer long; 
He suffers, but he cannot suffer wrong." 



onl\ one who can, ''rise on stepping- 
stones 01 his dead self to higher things." 
Life's bettle is a fierce one, and only 
the strong-willed one can, by facing its 
turmoil and strife, come off conquerer 
n the contest. In all our designs we 
must expect opposition, and that oppo- 
sition must be surmounted. It would 
be needless to cite them for we know 
them too well. 

The daring accomplishments of Napo- 
leon were the achievements of Lis indom 
itable will. Yon who know the history 
of the life of the mighty Ossar, will not 
doubt his firmness and resolution when 
you remember how, almost at the very 
moment of his attack upon the forces of 

Ariovistus his men were so much freight- ( T 

| Look over the lives ot English writers. 

ened bv the reports concerning the foe, L c , T , . .,. 

See Samuel Johnson toiling on and on 

that, thev were on the point of rebellion. , , ,, ., , , 

; through all those long and weary years; 

With everything against him. surround-. ,. , .,* , 

i see his ".truggles with poverty and see 

ed wi h di fie ilti that woul 1 h ive over- 1 , A , , , . 

| how often he was nearly overcome by it, 

whelmed most men, he, with a calm and then gee him con q Ue rer at last, but'as- 
compesed spirit, and a resolution as c , ibe it a]1 to his unconquerable will, 
unshaken as the firmest rock, undaunt-. Take the example of Walter Scott, 
ed by the difficulties that lay before him: | ftn d not a nobler one can be found on 



that the king he was addressing would 
have an occasion to remember his words 
by having them called to mind by the 
accomplishment of his own downfall, 
and the ruin of his hopes Yet Cyius, 
rising from the many difficulties that 
surrounded his birtn, with a soul ready 
to risk and dare anything, not only re- 
duced the rich and powertul Croesus to 
a state of perfect subjection, but still 
continuein^. his daring course he suc- 
ceeded in the accomplishment of the won 
derful feat of reducing the mighty Bab- 
ylon. 

But we need not turn so far back 
over the pages of history to find nobler 
and sublitner examples than these. — 



THE I Sl\ BRBiTY I. 



history's page. Oootemphfl with bin and yet « t 

the immense debt of ore* ■ half ■ mil- who R] 

lion of doUan ratting apon bit ehoulders win. Uu*i-h 
tnrough the failure of Italians m % and Whi I 

consider if you would allow >., foil a ., i i by 
a sense of honor influence ymi ai it did 
him; if you would, by wearing your verj 



D BDtO U ■ 

life away, endeavor to pay off race ■ inmll ai 
debt, or, by embracing the shift bf the pm,,,! 
law, escape from such | burthen. Pi tllla aill , Win , 



would, like him, hare attempted t 

brave such waves of adversity. I ut would 



bhows no sun. an fighter llm 

awful dark n. .-« end gloom || 



have given up in dispair and rank be- bin when tl 

ncth the financial crisis. But be, his round him endheil drWeu 

strong will undaunted, forsaking all ail itrong ai*d to el 

former hopes and aticipations, giving roaring 

up all his wealth and amusements, retir- with a heart BamoVed Dp I. 

ed to a room in Edinburgh, weU io work luge, guided by the lamp 



and raidly paid off the debt; end although 
the overworked bodily frame gave ana 



perien' 

he fiiidi bim.-e.l a 



he died conscious of the fact that by Ms M 



unconquerable resolution behadeoconi 
plihed an almost superhuman teak, I D I 
had saved the mansion at Abbetatnjrd 
for his children. 

We all admire the bravery of Wie- 



the magic touch u( hit all trdvrtei 

faith, the WW ids opinion 1- 

regaeded by him 

and gloom but a< u veil and »©<•:. 
-•ou.-i dawji. thr « 



James as related in the -Lady of tl, ,. ( , lS( , s t!l( . W11V ,,, p tln . I.-.^in^ • 
Lake," written bv the above mentioned 



author, when he found himself surroun- 



bett?r prepared to endure futur* 

enlightened I Bt 

ed by all "Clan-Alt ine's warriors true," . , , 

J ■ ebondoni the past and on the it< , 

id paM he r»s"i h« \ 

higher und nobler eaietenee m tl • 
world. Truh, 

•"Tls well for him +l r 



and discovered that he was free to fat, 
with Rhoderick Dhu himsel'. ahum b< 
had a few minutes before dotted, wben 
traced against a hug» clift of eftona, he 
exclaimed; 

•*Com»» on", com* all. tlii* rr>i k »lix!l f» , 
irmiu iu firm banc •« «oon »• I." 



54 



THE UNIVERSITY BULLETIN. 



The Harvard Advocate contains ani 

account of the arrest of two students by [ 

the Police of Cambridge. The offence 1 

i 
was singing - on .the College grounds, and 

the fine was $45.30. We believe this 
spirit of hatred among the lower classes, 
toward the students, exists at the seat of 
nearly every college. Here, if a stone is 
hurled through a street-lamp, we hear it 
remarked "the students did it," "the 
town will be burned by them yet," "life 
is not safe where they are," etc. By this 
class of persons students are regarded 
.with about the same feeling that a host 
of escaped convicts would be. We are 
glad to say that the more intelligent por- 
tion of the citizens regard them with 
feelings of quite a different character, 
and are glad to have them in the town. 

A Letter was recently received by a 
Student which has an interesting histo- 
ry. It was addressed ' 'Mr. , West 

Va. Institute. " The Post Master at the 
officS where it was mailed sent it to the 
Deaf and Dumb Institute , at Romney . 
but it did not find its owner, and was for- 
war. led to the Insane Asylum, at Weston, 
but with no better success. The Direc- 
tor wrote n'poTx it; "The man is not a lu- 
natic, send it to Mound? ville," where it 
shortly arrived, but the Superintendent 
Of the Ponitentiarv finding it did- not 



belong to any of his boarders, wrote up- 
on it; "The man is neither deaf or dumb, 
nor crazy, nor is he yet a felon ; he must 
be a man of learning, try Morgantown ." 
The letter came here and found its 
owner. 

Pouticai,. — We do net propose to con- 
vert our paper into a political journal, 
but we can see no harm in quietly giv- 
ing the current political movements of 
the day, so here is our fling. 

At present politics are somewhat mud- 
dled. "Louisana Troubles" fill every 
paper— after "The Great Scandal" has 
been dealt with. Tennessee unblushing- 
ly sends Andy Johnson to the U. S. Sen- 
ate, while Massachusetts, with a taste of 
entirely different character, sends Hon. 
Henry L. Dawes, a man of honor and 
integrity, as the successor of Chas. Sum- 
' ner. In our own State we have an in- 
teresting collection of human nature 
which expresses its desire to be caPed a 
Legislature. What this body will or 
will not do, remains to be seen. It 
| has elected Allen T. Caperton 10 the U. 
S. Senate. Mr. Caper* on is a graduate 
of Yale College, of the class of 1832. Be- 
■ side this, and removing the Capital, this 
collection of Solons has succe'eded in 
passing two bills. By the way, some 
one has caught the Public Printer in a 
i 



ThM UM\ r ):' : . 



little "neighbourly" • 
Bay, and the Trr... 
but then gr 
abont the bouse., 
dome subtle infl 
officers upon the nek 
StateTreasury. T\ aelitt] 
an oonnectionwith alitt] 
like nature, that oocui 
yean ago, remind uafforcil 






loud promise s of "r 



"MOI-MEME." 
tTn'aiie, qui demeute tt u Smoky-Hol 
ler," troma pur hasai I I 



■ • 



teurd'un petit M Held« demo- r 

antique, qui est & Fairm « 



revefat Ainsi deguiseeil 
viUesetu la campagne s'eflbi 
repandre partont la terreur. !.....• i 
tion ct Lea malices. Toon 1 - l>r.i\.- 
hoauues libenux du pnr'i demo 
?t repunlieain fayaientdefaiil Lui 
fm il renconfa tree, qu' A roulut 

epoavanter auaai; mail bomm< t 

aperoevanta quelqi 

deux cotes de b fcete d • 1 nnimal lui di- 
rect: 
M lfaitre lauaet, qnoique rotu aoyei 



.tndusvnt el mostrent, qv. 

Teellerncnt qu' un fin--. 






■ 

■ 

\\ . 

; 

; 

goal) c< 



Lessor out toujour* un I 
lea deoouTW at Lei t i 
L 'esprit de vengeance eat nil juste an, \ 



de mepria. 






mm,* 

The Examination of a i 
tho Cadetship at Wesl P 

on Wednesday and Thursday, IV. n ■■■, . , ; p ,. 
17th and 1st:., L875. The 
candidates; M- n ft >, of Fruntj 

tovn, Tu3'lor Cojnty, Scott, of the 1 air- , 



as 



THE VNIV'KkStTT BVLLET1X. 



of p ; es. not have a Reading Room whkh r would 
be benefit the students; one that would not 
enough to assist the Socitres in be beyond the reach cf all. 



this way, ms the prizes would gt, tothem 
and not to ihe performers, but it 



-poms 



thai no one in; the State is affected with], 
such a stroke of liberality. 



Tmx. — When a Prof watches us while 

; .-e are puitin. i ver-shoes, in the 

basement hall, thinking he will catch us 

in mischief, he should trump up u bet- 

Washixgtox's Birth-Day v.as eelc- ter excuse tha-n 'looking for the Janitor" 

prated by the Students in an appropri- i for we will certainly send the Janitor to 

nte pai her. A.t nine o'clock all the him, as soon as the Janitor can be 

led in the CTmver- found, as we did the other day. 
sityCJ ipeh There was also a/a/r rep- ^ o ^ 

resenfcation-- from the Semimry and town, i 

r and prayer WISS AND OTHERWISE. 
1 v Prof. Lyon, the audience was enter- ; 

On :' ■:■' ?Mt. Ghas. _ 
h n ling, :r:l then with a.',s;j s i 
'. ' ■ on the character 



Recir- tion in Chemistry. — Prof. "Mr. 

, {"on what source are vegetable 

incd?" 

Well, vegetable oils are 
■ all obtained from anirnaf bodies except 
sperm o'-'., which comes from peanuts, 



the Sophomor ■ , • 

cises, at eleven o'clock, a salute of twen- 
ty live guns was fired by the Cadet C . Student of Marietta College went to 

We have before us two pamp^lets^ sp oo1 * nd speIk " d feminin <? 

one "Notes on the Coal ' \ Vhegmanigne. 



West Virginia and Penn 
otr 



ia, the; Four students en their wav to the bay 
V " ■ on rh " ' ""■ the first time, became bonbtful as to 

Beaver County, Pa." They are from the next turn, and hailed a laborer at 
the pen of ;. C, Whit*, of the Class m^ofk lu a field. 

'72,. Tfcey.nreofranc] inl i sitothose Stttd .-.■>— "Hey! mister! whiehway 
engaged in the Coal Tratfe-especiaily do you take to go to the bay?" 
so to the trade ofthe-Monjongahela Yal- , poorer.— (after gazing at the party 
*'■'■ '■ doubtful of their sincerity.) "Any 

These pamphh ts are reprinted from ' way JOU ji st please." 
the Annals of the Lyceum of Natural: Students- "Now see her*; my gentle 
llistory, JNew i >rk. friend, non combatibus pro bono publi- 

The Reading Room seems to he aP 1 e alicodisgustit polly wogbull frog 



failure this terrr. There 



L ]f tihtinabulura. Dico te +, • 



a dozen managers, and two subscribers. tfJC '° ^ oraos T h'xif lup^ 

They are continually aceufii] tllo "respondit ergo dicite mihi, 6r 



other ofstealin ' T ut we 



■ manfully in the attempt." 



be "opinion respectfully,) "Jlrtf road 

jionally. e "Why could we to the left."— [Ex.] 



TBE UNIV1 - 






• 



"flnol 

It's call • . 

Ther 
sity. and they all 

• ♦ i 

EXCHANGES K 

<ir 

- 



Thank? to th< :..r • 

ncourazins remarks. it our i I 

■ . 
were- n 

. . . \ 

because we had not n 

selves. v\ e I ar it will 1 a lone tmio , 

before v.e a . 

it. un- 
interesting as this rnlcrtainine Mi*. ■ 

arr, 

The Virginia Unfa 
is generally sober en 
its las! 

! 
.,,... v. 
ted 8t oes will be composed of 
majority in 

Glory be t > G ■' 
ray somi thine \ 

spirit. 

it 

wero 

we Will CO 

what it ' 

■ 
articU is '-cry \ • 



WE UNIVERSITY RVLLKTIN. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 







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3000 Engravings, 1840 Pages, Quarto, 
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"Whenever I wish to ob'ain exact defi- 
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T7 very scholar knows its value. 
*^ [W. H. Preseott, the Historian. 

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-* John L. Motley, the Historian. 

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